FIRE RESTRICTIONS MAP

AN INTERACTIVE MAP SHOWING CURRENT PUBLIC USE RESTRICTIONS AS WELL AS INDUSTRIAL FIRE PRECAUTION LEVELS CAN BE FOUND AT: www.oregon.gov/odf/pages/fire/precautionlevelmap.aspx




Monday, August 31, 2015

Oregon Dept. of Forestry fire update - 08-31-15

This is an Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) fire update for Monday, Aug. 31, 2015.

Light to heavy precipitation occurred on the west side of the Cascades over the weekend, with scattered light precipitation on the east side. The cooler temperatures and higher humidity moderated fire behavior in some areas, but fire danger persists. The public is asked to continue to exercise extreme caution in the forest with any activity that could potentially start a wildfire. Firefighting resources are scarce due to the large fires burning in Oregon and Washington, and any new fires would strain the fire protection system.

FIRE FACTS

The 12,504-acre Eagle Complex 20 miles NW of Richland, Oregon, is 60 percent contained. The fires are currently staffed with 327 total personnel. Resources include: nine hand crews, 12 fire engines and five helicopters.

The 105,048-acre Canyon Creek Complex south of John Day is 49 percent contained. The fires are currently staffed with 1,026 total personnel. Resources include: 23 hand crews, 69 fire engines and five helicopters.

The 20,635-acre Eldorado Fire five miles SE of Unity is 99 percent contained. The fire is currently staffed with 32 total personnel. Resources include: one hand crew and four fire engines.

The 102,089-acre Cornet-Windy Ridge Complex 16 miles south of Baker City is 85 percent contained. The fire is currently staffed with 32 total personnel. Resources include: one hand crew and four fire engines.

The 74,471-acre Grizzly Bear Complex 20 miles SE of Dayton, Wash., and near Troy, Ore., in the Northeast Oregon District is 17 percent contained. The fires are currently staffed with 915 total personnel. Resources include: 17 hand crews, 34 fire engines and five helicopters.

The 26,452-acre Stouts Creek Fire 16 miles east of Canyonville is 90 percent contained. The fire is currently staffed with 343 total personnel. Resources include: five hand crews, 11 fire engines, and one helicopter.

The 353-acre Falls Creek Fire five miles south of Joseph is 50 percent contained. The fire is currently staffed with 116 total personnel. Resources include: three hand crews, four fire engines and one helicopter.

The 280-acre Cove Fire in the Central Oregon District three miles NW of Culver, Ore., is expected to be fully contained later today.

Sunday, August 30, 2015

Eagle Complex update - 08-30-15


On Saturday, gusty winds tested the containment lines that firefighters have been constructing from the eastern flank of the fire to the natural barriers near the boundary of the Eagle Cap Wilderness. Despite wind gusts of 40 mph, firefighters, working with the assistance of helicopters, kept the fire within the containment lines. Aerial resources also supported structure protection efforts in the Footbridge area as the western flank of the fire continued to back down the Two Colors and Boulder Creek drainages. In the afternoon, the fire area was blanketed with light rain and the humidity helped suppress fire activity.

On Sunday, weather conditions are forecasted to be cooler with high relative humidity and a 50 percent chance of showers. Firefighters are looking to take advantage of the break in the weather to secure containment lines along the fire perimeter, continue mopping up around structures in East Eagle Creek and manage fire activity in the Boulder Creek drainage.

The Eagle Complex is currently 12,504 acres and 25 percent contained. Although the containment has not increased in the past few days, natural barriers around much of the fire perimeter on the north are anticipated to limit future fire growth. Rocky areas and open meadows to the north and northeast of the fire perimeter are unlikely to support further fire activity in these directions.

Evacuations: The Baker County Sheriff's Office maintains a LEVEL 3 evacuation notice to include where the intersection of the 7700 road turns to the Northeast at the intersection of the 7700 and 7015 roads up the Long Creek drainage to the wilderness.

The evacuation levels for the area south of the 7735 road, South of the junction of the 7735 and 7700 road to McBride Campground and over to Carson down to the forest boundary remain at LEVEL 2 (Get Set). Evacuation levels for the Eagle Complex are available on the interactive incident map (
http://arcg.is/1I5DaJw).

Area Fire Closures: There is an area closure in effect for the Eagle Complex near Main Eagle, East Eagle, Tamarack Campground and Two Color Campground. Please see the link to the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest Website (
http://www.fs.usda.gov/main/wallowa-whitman/home).
     
FIRE FACTS
Start Date:                  August 11, 2015
Cause:                        Lightning
Location:                    20 Miles NW of Richland, Oregon
Size:                            12,504 acres
Containment:              25%
Resources:                 315 Personnel
                                    9 crews, 12 fire engines, 4 water tenders, 5 bulldozers
                                     4 Type 1 helicopters,1 Type 3 helicopters



Stouts Creek Fire update - 08-30-15

Stouts Creek Fire

Yesterday the weather brought up to 1/10 of an inch of rain to areas within the fire. Crews continue to work to contain the Stouts Creek Fire strengthening control lines and conducting repair work.  Winds will be out of the SW at 5- 15 mph today, so firefighters will remain alert for any changes in the fire behavior. Fire size remains at 26,452 acres and is 90 percent contained. 

The Douglas Forest Protection Association staff along with the Information Officer from the Stouts Creek Fire worked a community outreach event Friday and Saturday in Canyonville.  They set up an information booth  and sign boards that included information on the fire along with fire prevention materials. The event brought more than 1,000 attendees over the two days.

“We were able to talk to many people whose lives were impacted by this fire,” said Judith Tear, Information Officer with the Florida Forest Service Type 3 Team. “Their gratitude toward everyone who has helped with the fire was humbling and their resiliency impressive.”

The Level 1 evacuation notice has been lifted for Stouts Creek fire. Oregon Department of Forestry released a new statement for “Regulated Closure Proclamation” Number 10. This proclamation was effective on August 29, 2015. Please visit the Douglas Forest Protection Association web site for more information
http://www.dfpa.net/.

There are 365 personnel assigned to the fire with six crews, 11 engines, five water tenders, one bulldozer and two helicopters. To date, the Stout Creek Fire has cost $36.7 million.
The Incident Management Team is protecting lands that are about 46 percent on state protected lands, which include Bureau of Land Management and private lands and 54 percent on the Umpqua National
Forest.


FIRE FACTS
● 26,452 acres
● 90% contained
● Personnel:365
● Helos: 2
● Handcrews: 6
● Engines: 11
● Dozers: 1
● Water Tenders: 5
● Evacuations:None at this time

ODF fire update - 08-30-15

This is an Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) fire update for Sunday, Aug. 30, 2015.

FIRE FACTS

The 12,504-acre Eagle Complex 20 miles NW of Richland, Oregon, is 25 percent contained. The fires are currently staffed with 315 total personnel. Resources include: nine hand crews, 12 fire engines and five helicopters.

The 101,465-acre Canyon Creek Complex south of John Day is 49 percent contained. The fires are currently staffed with759 total personnel. Resources include: 10 hand crews, 67 fire engines and nine helicopters.

The 20,635-acre Eldorado Fire five miles SE of Unity is 90 percent contained. The fire is currently staffed with 32 total personnel. Resources include: one hand crew and four fire engines.

The 102,089-acre Cornet-Windy Ridge Complex 16 miles south of Baker City is 85 percent contained. The fire is currently staffed with 33 total personnel. Resources include: one hand crew and four fire engines.

The 73,658-acre Grizzly Bear Complex 20 miles SE of Dayton, Wash., and near Troy, Ore., in the Northeast Oregon District is 10 percent contained. The fires are currently staffed with 749 total personnel. Resources include: 12 hand crews, 34 fire engines and five helicopters.

The 26,452-acre Stouts Creek Fire 16 miles east of Canyonville is 90 percent contained. The fire is currently staffed with 365 total personnel. Resources include: six hand crews, 11 fire engines, and two helicopters.

The 396-acre Falls Creek Fire five miles south of Joseph is 35 percent contained. The fire is currently staffed with 186 total personnel. Resources include: seven hand crews and nine fire engines.

The 200-acre Cove Fire in the Central Oregon District three miles NW of Culver, Ore., is 30 percent contained. Firefighters are performing mop-up today and securing fire lines. The fire was human-caused. ODF, Jefferson County RFD, Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service are partnering in the suppression effort. Two vacant residences and several outbuildings were destroyed. The fire was reported Aug. 29.

Thursday, August 27, 2015

Stouts Creek Fire update - 08-27-15

Crews continue to work to contain the Stouts Creek Fire. Day and night operations remain as firefighters continue suppression, strengthening control lines and conducting repair work. No perimeter growth is expected. Yesterday a Type 1 helicopter made 22 drops of approximately 700 gallons per drop. A total of 15,400 gallons were dropped on a flare up on the south end of the fire east of Cow Creek. Fire size remains at 26,452 acres (due to more accurate mapping) and is 86 percent contained.  

“We are committed to this fire and the state of Oregon.” said Butch Galbraith, Operations Chief for the Florida Forest Service Incident Management Team, “It is important to us to leave this community and our fire partners with a manageable and operable situation during this dry fire season.” Mr. Galbraith went on to say, “The team, along with all other fire resources, will work together to resolve the situation as quickly and safely as possible.”

Level 1 evacuation notice is still in effect along Hwy 227 from mile post 26-20 and 28-34. Also Upper Cow Creek Road remains at Level 1 from the east end of the road. The fire area remains closed to the public. Local residents should be aware of the danger that still exists in their area, monitor emergency services, websites and local media outlets for information.

There are 418 personnel assigned to the fire with 8 crews, 11 engines, 5 water tenders, 2 bulldozers and 2 helicopters. To date, the Stout Creek Fire has cost $36 million. The Incident Management Team is protecting lands that are about 46 percent on state protected lands, which include Bureau of Land Management and private lands and 54 percent on the Umpqua National Forest.


FIRE FACTS
● 26,452 acres
● 86% contained
● 158 residences threatened
● Personnel:418
● Helicopters: 2
● Hand crews: 8
● Fire engines: 12
● Bulldozers: 2
● Water Tenders: 5
● Evacuations:. All areas remain at Evacuation Level 1 (Get Ready).
 
FIRE INFORMATION
Phone:  541-825-3724
Cell: 206-402-7175
stoutsfire@gmail.com
www.facebook.com/stoutsfire
https://www.flickr.com/photos/stoutsfirephotos/
@stoutsfire #stoutsfire
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/

Eagle Complex update - 08-27-15

Incident Summary
Start Date:                  August 11, 2015
Cause:                        Lightning
Location:                    20 Miles NW of Richland, Oregon
Size:                           11,908 acres
Containment:              7%
Resources:                 328 Personnel
                                     9 Crews, 14 Engines, 4 Water Tenders, 7 Dozers
                                     4 Type 1 Helicopters,1 Type 3 Helicopters


 
On Wednesday, air support from fixed wing aircraft - including one 11,600-gal. retardant drop from a DC-10 VLAT (Very Large Air Tanker) - totaled 30,000 gal. on the Eagle Complex ,with an additional 2,000 gal. dropped using heavy helicopters. The aerial resources assisted firefighters in securing containment lines and cooling hot spots across the fire, primarily focusing on the East Eagle area where crews continued preparing lines in preparation for a burnout running from the eastern most section of the fire to the Little Eagle Creek. Crews were able to bring fire from the southern edge of the fire to the east of Forest Service Road 7745, down the hill to the road. Finally, structure protection measures remain in place around the fire perimeter including near Footbridge, just north of where the fire is continuing to back down the Boulder Creek and Two Colors drainages toward Forest Service Road 7755.

On Thursday, winds are expected to remain out of the south-southwest with gusts up to 20 m.p.h. Indirect containment lines running east to west from the eastern-most section of the fire to the Eagle Cap Wilderness are expected to be completed today, and firefighters plan to burn out from the containment lines to secure the fire’s eastern edge as conditions allow. Aerial resources will continue supporting firefighters on the ground during the burnout operation. Crews remain engaged in mop-up efforts on Forest Service Road 77 to the junction of the 7745 road to secure the southern edge of the fire, as well as continuing mop-up around structures in the East Eagle Creek area.



Evacuations: The Baker County Sheriff's Office maintains a LEVEL 3 evacuation notice to include where the intersection of the 7700 road turns to the Northeast at the intersection of the 7700 and 7015 roads up the Long Creek drainage to the wilderness.

The evacuation levels for the area south of the 7735 road, South of the junction of the 7735 and 7700 road to McBride Campground and over to Carson down to the forest boundary remain at LEVEL 2 (Get Set). Evacuation levels for the Eagle Complex are available on the interactive incident map (
http://arcg.is/1I5DaJw).

Area Fire Closures: There is an area closure in effect for the Eagle Complex near Main Eagle, East Eagle, Tamarack Campground and Two Color Campground. Please see the link to the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest Website (
http://www.fs.usda.gov/main/wallowa-whitman/home).
   

Canyon Creek Complex update - 08-27-15

Hot, dry weather and winds increase fire activity Wednesday, similar conditions today

Afternoon winds coupled with hot and dry conditions fanned the eastern portion down from Norton Fork to Pine Creek, triggering evacuations. Five heavy air tankers responded quickly and dropped seven to ten loads of retardant near residential areas. The initial large column of smoke, which was visible from John Day and Prairie City, was generated by heavy fire activity and long range spotting north of Indian Creek Butte and then moving down into Pine Creek.  Later southwest winds in the valley pushed the fire around the slope to the east and towards Indian Creek. Weather conditions kept the fire very active into the night and early morning, when it finally moderated.

Upper Pine Creek, Gardner Ranch Lane and Upper Dog Creek south of Little Dog Creek were raised to a Level 3 evacuation. Lower Pine Creek and Dog Creek are in Level 2 evacuation.

In anticipation of the unstable conditions, firefighters were pre-positioned in strategic locations along the northern section of the fire and in the residential areas of Upper Pine Creek and Upper Dog Creek. They spent the day improving and connecting contingency lines and monitoring the area closely. In the early evening and when work conditions were safe, they provided critical structure protection needs.

No burnout operations were conducted yesterday.

Southwest winds along the western and southern fire perimeter the last several days enabled firefighters to locate and extinguish hot spots. That hard work has resulted in 44 percent containment of the Canyon Creek Complex and created more control lines along the southern and western sides of the fire.     

Night operations worked to secure fire lines and structures on the northeast flank of the fire.

Planned Actions Include:

Canyon Creek
•   The fire line will be tested again today due to a local Red Flag Warning for hot and dry conditions and southwest winds up to 20 m.p.h. and unstable air mass. Anticipate smoke columns and active fire movement.

•   Fire managers intend to be flexible and strategic, using the right resources, at the right time and in the right locations.

•   Crews will continue to improve and hold dozer and hand lines along the forest’s northern border and provide protection to residences.

•   Air tankers will be used as soon as possible to pre-treat structures in the Indian Creek area. Air tankers will also drop retardant along dozer lines for reinforcement in the Dog Creek area. 

•   Crews will do fire suppression repair on the western side of the fire, rehabilitating dozer lines, fixing fences and putting in water bars to reduce erosion.

•   Oregon Trails Electric Coop continues to restore power to residences along Hwy 395.

Oregon Dept. of Transportation (ODOT): Highway 395 is open for two-way travel. Due to firefighters, equipment and the power company on the road, a pilot car will lead traffic in specific areas between 6 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Anticipate delays. 

Grant County Sheriff: The Grant County Sheriff’s Office reminds people to be respectful of private property and to remain on the road unless invited.  Trespassing is punishable by law and violators will be prosecuted.

Oregon National Guard: Six twenty-person National Guard squads are contributing to the Canyon Creek Complex fire suppression efforts. Stationed at the Lake Creek Organizational Camp, they are working the western and southern perimeters of the fire, patrolling and securing the control lines and ensuring that hot spots 150 feet in from the line are out.

Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER): A BAER team has been ordered and will begin to conduct a water shed assessment of the area in order to plan rehabilitation of fire lines and mitigate soil erosion.

Weather: A local Red Flag Warning for hot and dry conditions and 15 to 20 mph southwest winds is in effect today.

Air Quality Index: Anticipate varying levels of smoke. For more specific information visit Oregon Smoke Information at http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com.

 
FIRE FACTS
 
Cause:                                       Lightning

Date of Origin:                        August 12, 2015

Location:                                 One mile south of the towns of John Day and Canyon City, Oregon.

Types of Fuel:                         Timber with brush/grass understory; areas of medium density logging slash.

Structures Threatened:            75

Structures Damaged:               50

Residences Destroyed:            39

Current Size:                           85,960 acres

Percent Containment:              44%

Number of Personnel:             715   

Types of resources:                 2 Type 1 crews, 8 Type 2 crews, 7 helicopters, 67 engines, 14 dozers, 21 water tenders, 11 skidgines

Comments and questions

The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

The weather conditions setting up for this summer are ominous: continuing drought, meager winter snowpack, and above-average temperatures forecast through August.

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Protection jurisdiction
The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state- and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. There are about 30.4 million total acres of forest in Oregon.

Fire suppression policy
The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. Suppression of large fires can run into millions of dollars.

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Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.