FIRE RESTRICTIONS MAP

AN INTERACTIVE MAP SHOWING CURRENT PUBLIC USE RESTRICTIONS AS WELL AS INDUSTRIAL FIRE PRECAUTION LEVELS CAN BE FOUND AT: www.oregon.gov/odf/pages/fire/precautionlevelmap.aspx




Monday, July 6, 2015

Central Oregon fire update - July 6 afternoon

FIRE NEWS--Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center

PRINEVILLE, Ore. – Parts of Central Oregon received much needed rain this afternoon in a storm that also brought 22 lightning strikes (as of 4:35 pm. PST) to the Sisters and Cascade Lakes area. Firefighters are currently responding to two smoke reports, one is the Black Fly Fire (Incident #330) five miles with of Squaw Creek. This is an Oregon Department of Forestry fire and is currently 1/10 of an acre. The second smoke report (Incident #331) is by Anns Butte, two miles southwest of Sunriver. The rain is expected to play a positive role in both incidents in helping firefighters keep fires small and mop up any hot spots.

There are no current updates on the Corner Creek Fire, 11 miles south of Dayville.

As a reminder, several closures are still in place for the Corner Creek Fire including an Ochoco National Forest area closure and the South Fork Road/Co. Rd. 42 which is closed to the general public from near Dayville to south of the US Forest Service 58 Road junction due to fire activity. To read the entire closure order and view a map of the area closure, please visit the Ochoco National Forest website at http://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/ochoco/alerts-notices 

Information about the Sugarloaf and Corner Creek Fires, managed by the Oregon Department of Forestry Team 1, can be found at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/

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Oregon Dept. of Forestry fire update - July 6

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
Niagara Fire - The 70-acre Niagara Fire was 35 percent contained as of 2 p.m. today. It is burning mostly on state forest lands in the Santiam Unit of the North Cascade District along Highway 22 adjacent to the Big Cliff Dam. ODF will continue to work today to secure containment lines. Fire conditions continue to challenge firefighters, with any spot fires beyond the fire lines spreading rapidly. Slightly cooler temperatures forecast for today are expected to aid the firefighting effort. ODF has been receiving valuable assistance from the Willamette National Forest and several local fire departments. More info: http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS
Corner Creek Fire - The lightning-caused Corner Creek Fire is 26,414 acres and 15 percent contained. The fire continues to burn actively on the west side of the South Fork John Day River. Private lands in the fire area are protected by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) through an offset agreement with ODF, which has jurisdictional responsibility. ODF's Team 1 is managing the firefighting operation.

Bunker Hill Complex - The lightning-caused Bunker Hill Complex 30 miles SE of Oakridge is 388 acres and 90 percent contained. It is burning on National Forest lands.

Dennis Creek Fire - The lightning-caused Dennis Creek Fire 15 miles east of Union is 192 acres and uncontained. The fire is burning on National Forest lands.

Jones Canyon Fire - The lightning-caused Jones Canyon Fire 12.5 miles NE of Monument is 840 acres and 75 percent contained. The fire is burning on BLM lands.

Radar Fire - The human-caused Radar Fire four miles west of Burns is 400 acres and uncontained. The fire is burning on BLM lands.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Rod Nichols, 503-945-7425 office, 503-508-0574 mobile, any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon's forests.

Niagara Fire update - July 6 morning

July 6, 2015    

Niagara Fire Update                                                     
Oregon Department of Forestry                                                                                                     
North Cascades District, Santiam Unit
Russ Lane, Incident Commander                                                                                            
Fire Information: (503) 801-8468. http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/

Fire at a glance:
Size: 70 acres, 15% contained
Location: Adjacent to Big Cliff Dam on Highway 22
Personnel: 120
Aircraft: 3 helicopters
Weather: warm and dry today, compared to hot and dry yesterday
 
Fire control efforts continue on the Niagara Fire located adjacent to the Big Cliff Dam along Highway 22. Fire size has not changed from its size of 70 acres and is now is 15 percent contained.  The fire was first reported on July 4, 2015.
Today, July 6, 2015, the goal will be to “continue to build a fire containment line to secure the fire,” said Blake Ellis Operations Chief adding that “night [firefighting forces] set us up for success today.” Staffing has increased to 120 personnel and has been divided into two shifts providing 24-hour coverage on the fire.

Primary threat to reaching containment is the explosive growth whenever any fire is able to get across the fire line. These “slopovers” have shown that they can grow rapidly, but water-dropping helicopters have been used effectively to stop their spread.

There are no road or recreational closures associated with the fire at this time. Visitors to the Detroit Lake Recreation Area should be aware that boating on the west end of the lake and recreational activities on Detroit dam may be limited due to fire activity. For those traveling Highway 22, visit the Oregon Department of Transportation Trip Check site http://tripcheck.com for the most current information. Fire traffic is heavy in the vicinity of the Big Cliff Dam, and the public is advised to use caution when traveling in this area.
The cause of the fire is under investigation. Fire restrictions are in effect on the Willamette National Forest and state and private forests, http://www.oregon.gov/odf/pages/fire/precautionlevelmap.aspx.

Cooperators include: Willamette National Forest, Marion County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon Department of Transportation, Bonneville Power Administration, Detroit-Idahna Fire District, Gates Fire Department, and Lyons Fire Department


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Sunday, July 5, 2015

Corner Creek Fire update - July 5, 2015 afternoon


Oregon Department of Forestry                                                                                                                                                   

Incident Management Team 1                                                                                                                                                    

John Buckman, Incident Commander                                                                                                                                      
                                                                                                                                                                                                          
Fire Information: (541) 987-2348                                                                                                                                              
                                                                                                                                                                                                      
A minor change in the weather has made a significant difference for firefighters working to contain the 26,000-acre Corner Creek Fire, located 11 miles south of Dayville on the Ochoco National Forest. It has also helped to have assembled a sizeable fire suppression workforce supported by plenty of hardware.

Today, seven helicopters are poised to haul water buckets or sling equipment to firefighters in even the most remote portions of the fire. Air tankers are also available, if needed. Eight bulldozers and 28 20-person crews, including eight hotshot crews, are distributed along the south and west flanks of the Corner Creek Fire to construct containment line and respond to spot fires, should they occur. Thirty-five wildland fire engines patrol the South Fork John Day River road and other roads inside and outside of the burned area to extinguish hot spots near the fire’s edge.

And due to the slightly cooler, moister air, firefighters have spent more time lately on strengthening containment lines instead of chasing spot fires.

The average daytime temperature has dropped from 100-plus degrees to the mid-90s, and the humidity has climbed from single-digits into the teens. Overnight the humidity rises to nearly 50 percent. While this may seem insignificant for most people, this has been a dramatic change for firefighters toiling night and day to keep the fire from crossing containment lines. Lower temperatures and higher humidity means fire behavior is less intense.

This is a major change from last week. For several days in a row, the Corner Creek Fire slipped out of control and surged south across forests and rangeland, sometimes burning thousands of acres in a few hours.

Now, fire crews are making a bare-earth fireline around the southern-most three-fourths of the Corner Creek Fire, protecting valuable forestland, rangeland and sage grouse habitat from wildfire. The northern quarter of the fire, in the Black Canyon Wilderness, is being treated more tenderly by hotshot crews trained to slow the fire’s advance with light-on-the-land suppression tactics.

While the fire is only 10 percent contained, its chances for escape, particularly toward private lands and areas of sage grouse habitat, reduce hour-by-hour as containment lines grow ever longer. Final containment of this incident will take a significant amount of time and additional work.

Suppression operations are being supervised by the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Incident Management Team 1, led by Incident Commander John Buckman.

Information about the Corner Creek Fire is posted online at www.centralorfireinfo.blogspot.com.

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Brian Ballou
Fire Prevention Specialist
ODF Southwest Oregon District
Office: (541) 665-0662
Cell: (541) 621-4156

 

Niagara Fire 15 percent contained

The 70-acre Niagara Fire burning in the North Cascade District's Santiam Unit is 15 percent contained as of Sunday afternoon. Continued hot, dry conditions have intensified fire behavior today, and firefighters are hitting the blaze hard with aerial and ground resources. Burning beside Highway 22 near Big Cliff Dam, the fire was reported around noon on July 4. The Oregon Dept. of Forestry is leading the suppression effort, and the U.S. Forest Service and local fire departments are assisting. Cause remains under investigation. 

Niagara Fire update July 5, 2015 morning


[Note: This is a more complete update on the Niagara Fire than the one posted earlier.]      
Oregon Department of Forestry                                                                                                     
North Cascades District, Santiam Unit
Russ Lane, Incident Commander                                                                                            
Fire Information: (503) 801-8468. http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/
Fire at a glance
Size: 70 acres
Location: Adjacent to Big Cliff Dam on Highway 22
Personnel: 100
Aircraft: 5 helicopters, 3 Type 1, 2 Type 2
Weather: hot dry conditions expected to continue

The Niagara Fire was reported on July 4, 2015 burning above Big Cliff Dam along Highway 22.  The fire grew rapidly with some spotting burning through heavy timber to a size now estimated at 70 acres.  Helicopters and air tankers were used to slow its growth, and little additional growth was observed overnight.
Today, July 5, 2015, the goal explained by Russ Lane, Incident Commander “is to knock the fire down by air and get a containment line around it on the ground.”  Weather in the fire area continues to be hot and dry, with historically dry fuels.  About 100 personnel are assigned to the fire.  Five helicopters, three heavy lift and two medium lift, are available to provide support for fire line construction. 
There are no road or recreational closures associated with the fire at this time. Visitors to the Detroit Lake Recreation Area should be aware that boating on the west end of the lake and recreational activities on Detroit dam may be limited due to fire activity. For those traveling Highway 22, visit the Oregon Department of Transportation Trip Check site http://tripcheck.com  for the most current information.  Fire traffic is heavy in the vicinity of the Big Cliff Dam and the public is advised to use caution when traveling in this area.
The cause of the fire is under investigation. Fire restrictions are in effect on the Willamette National Forest and state and private forests, http://www.oregon.gov/odf/pages/fire/precautionlevelmap.aspx.
Cooperators include: Willamette National Forest, Marion County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon Department of Transportation, Bonneville Power Administration, Detroit-Idahna Fire District, Gates Fire Department, and Lyons Fire Department
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Niagara Fire update - July 5 morning

Firefighters continue to battle the 70-acre Niagara Fire in the Santiam Unit of Oregon Department of Forestry’s North Cascade District. Reported July 4 about noon, the fire is burning near Highway 22 in the vicinity of the Big Cliff Dam. ODF is being assisted by the U.S. Forest Service as well as local rural fire departments.

Approx. 100 personnel are fighting the fire today. ODF has increased the air attack and will have five helicopters dropping water today, along with large and small air tankers delivering fire retardant. Several private contract hand crews are on scene, for a total of 100 personnel fighting the fire.

The Niagara Fire is uncontained at present. The fire is burning on steep terrain in heavy timber. Hot, dry conditions persist in the area, which will challenge firefighters as they work to contain the blaze. Cause is under investigation.

Highway 22 remains open. Traffic is expected to be heavy today, with travelers returning from the Fourth of July holiday weekend, and firefighting equipment also moving along the major travel route.

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Comments and questions

The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

The weather conditions setting up for this summer are ominous: continuing drought, meager winter snowpack, and above-average temperatures forecast through August.

What we do

Protection jurisdiction
The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state- and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. There are about 30.4 million total acres of forest in Oregon.

Fire suppression policy
The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. Suppression of large fires can run into millions of dollars.

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Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.