2015 another severe fire season

In 2015, more than 631,000 acres burned on all forestland jurisdictions in Oregon. Firefighting costs totaled $240.5 million.

Thursday, June 23, 2016

War Canyon Fire Burns 20 Acres East of Long Creek

The War Canyon Fire was reported around 12:30 PM Wednesday burning in grass and brush on ODF-protected lands two miles east of Long Creek, Ore. Oregon Department of Forestry fire-fighting resources from the Central Oregon District’s John Day Unit were assisted by firefighters from the Long Creek Rural Fire Department. Firefighters stopped the fire spread at approximately 20 acres.

ODF resources on scene included four engines, a four-person hand crew, and the incident commander. Firefighting personnel will continue the mop-up process today to extinguish heat within the fire perimeter.

The cause of the War Canyon Fire is under investigation.

No other fires 10 acres in size or larger were reported yesterday on ODF-protected lands.

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Fire Update - June 21, 2016


Update: Early season wildfire burns nearly 100 acres

A wildfire ignited Monday afternoon burning approximately 100 acres, five miles west of The Dalles in the Central Oregon District.
Courtesy: ODF Central Oregon District
It was originally reported by crews that the fire was roughly 45 acres; however, remapping has shown the wildfire is larger. This is not due to fire growth, but better measurement.
 
The Chenoweth Fire began around 5:20 p.m. on state-protected land and burned through the night before crews could extinguish all visible flames.
Alongside the crews from the Oregon Department of Forestry, a private contractor, Steelhead Enterprises, pitched in fighting this fire.
Firefighters will continue to strengthen the trails creating a containment buffer. The fire is contained. Fire crews will work on hot spots the rest of the day.
The cause of the fire is currently under investigation.
 
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As we head into this week, the Fire Danger Level is Low to Moderate throughout the state.
The Fire Forecast shows windy, dry weather will last for one more day throughout several regions. But temperatures look to remain around average as more showers are anticipated in the middle of the week. Summer weather is expected to return this weekend. It’s a reminder to know the changing conditions before enjoying the outdoors!

Monday, June 20, 2016

Break from wildfire activity may be coming to an end

The mild weather over the past several days has given firefighters a break. But summer officially arrived June 19, and a seasonal warming and drying trend now underway is expected to increase the potential for new fire starts. It's a great time of year to enjoy Oregon's forests, but please practice fire safety as you recreate.

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Akawana Fire - final update, June 15, 2016

Christie Shaw
Public Information Officer
541-263-0661
Christie.shaw@oregon.gov

Mop-up operations for the 2,094 acre Akawana Fire are nearly complete. The fire is now 95 percent contained, with a 500-foot cold black line around most of the perimeter. Smoke may continue to be visible from material burning in the interior of the fire for several weeks. Cool, moist weather throughout central Oregon has aided firefighters during the mop-up activities, and reduced interior fire activity. Firefighters experienced scattered showers over some parts of the fire today, and the weather forecast calls for additional precipitation over the next few days.

The Type 3 Team, led by Incident Commander Rob Pentzer, will transfer command of the fire back to ODF’s Central Oregon District Thursday morning. A 10-person hand crew from the district will continue to patrol the fire, extinguishing any smoke or flames within the 500-foot perimeter on Thursday. District personnel will continue to monitor the fire and provide regular patrols throughout fire season.

The Emergency Area Closure implemented for public safety near the fire for the Deschutes and Ochoco National Forests and Crooked River Grassland was lifted June 14, 2016, at 6 a.m. The public is asked to keep clear of firefighting activities, including mop-up operations and patrols within the Akawana Fire perimeter. 

While the weather may be in a cooling trend with scattered moisture, it is still fire season in the Central Oregon District. Burning is allowed by permit only. Please contact your local ODF office for further information. Exploding targets and tracer ammunition are prohibited during fire season, as well as sky lanterns.
This will be the final news release for the Akawana Fire. Please direct questions or requests for information to Christie Shaw (541-263-0661), Information Officer for the Central Oregon District.  For more information on ODF’s Central Oregon District visit www.ODFcentraloregon.com.

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Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Fire update - June 15, 2016

No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported in the past 24 hours on Oregon Dept. of Forestry-protected lands. While weather conditions have muted wildfire activity, the transition to summer is underway and with it a rise in fire danger. Enjoy Oregon's forests but please be "fire aware" as you recreate.
 
FIRE FACTS 
Akawana Fire -  On Tuesday firefighters continued mop-up activities within the fire perimeter, working to extinguish flames and smoke within 500 feet of the fire line. Most of the work is complete, But smoke may be visible from smoldering stumps or burning material well within the fire perimeter. Crews also worked hard to remove the remaining fire hose from the fire line. 
 
Mop-up will continue today. The fire is now 90 percent contained at 2,094 acres burned. The lightning-caused Akawana Fire was reported June 7 burning north of Sisters in ODF's Central Oregon District.. Recent conditions have muted fire activity. But the seasonal transition is underway and with it warm, dry weather that will increase wildfire activity. Please be "fire aware" as you recreate in the forest.

The Northwest Preparedness Level has been lowered to 1, effective June 15, 2016. Among other things PL-1 means that the potential for emerging significant wildland fires is expected to remain minimal.

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Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Fire update - June 14, 2016

No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported in the past 24 hours on Oregon Dept. of Forestry-protected lands. Cooler weather with rain in some parts of the state have moderated wildfire conditions. But fire danger will rise with the return of warm, dry weather. Please be fire safety-conscious in the forest.

Monday, June 13, 2016

Akawana Fire final update - June 13, 2016

Oregon Department of Forestry
Incident Management Team 3
Link Smith, Incident Commander

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4772
 
Note: This will be the final update from this team.

Sisters, OR –  The Oregon Department of Forestry’s Type 1 Incident Management Team, led by Incident Commander Link Smith, will hand the fire over to a smaller Type 3 organization tomorrow. The Team would like to thank the Sisters, Three Rivers and Grandview communities for their kind hospitality and support during its stay.
The size of the fire remains 2,094 acres, and it is now 80 percent contained.

While fire crews have reached at least 300 feet into the fire from the perimeter with mop-up operations, residents may see smoke for several days from burning stumps and snags well within containment lines.

The Type 3 Team in place for the next few days is made up of about 140 firefighters and support staff. Equipment assigned to the fire with this team will include three fire engines, four water tenders, two bulldozers, three skidgines and one helicopter. The fire camp will be moved to ODF’s Sisters sub-unit office.

Now that the smoke has cleared over the Akawana Fire, residents should continue to treat fire season with respect. Everyone is encouraged to follow current fire season restrictions to prevent human-caused fires.

In addition, residents of the wildland-urban interface, where communities border forests and grazing lands, should always be prepared before fire threatens communities. Have a plan that includes making arrangements for persons with special needs, livestock and pets. Learn more about the Ready Set Go Program at www.wildlandfirersg.org/

To stay up to date on fire information in central Oregon, please follow Oregon Department of Forestry’s Central Oregon District on Facebook. Other valuable resources include www.inciweb.nwcg.gov, www.oregon.gov/odf, www.keeporegongreen.org and www.airnow.gov.

The incident management team would also like to recognize and thank all cooperating agencies that assisted us in the complete and coordinated fire protection system on this fire. Agencies and partners included the Oregon State Fire Marshal’s Office and responding structural task forces from around the state, Lake Chinook Fire District, the Central Oregon Fire Management Service, Crooked River National Grasslands, PGE/Warms Springs Tribes Land Ownership, U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and Jefferson and Deschutes County Emergency Management.

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Comments and questions

The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

The weather conditions setting up for this summer are ominous: continuing drought, meager winter snowpack, and above-average temperatures forecast through August.

What we do

Protection jurisdiction
The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state- and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. There are about 30.4 million total acres of forest in Oregon.

Fire suppression policy
The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. Suppression of large fires can run into millions of dollars.

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About Me

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Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.