Current situation

Widespread rain and unseasonably cool temperatures in Oregon have dampened existing fires and prevented new ones, easing the strain on firefighting resources. At the same time, wet conditions are making it harder on firefighters trying to remove equipment and repair the impacts from suppression efforts. In steep areas that burned earlier this summer, mudflows, rockslides and fire-weakened trees falling are concerns.






















Tuesday, August 31, 2010

Daily fire update, August 31, 2010

No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported during the past 24 hours on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

Monday, August 30, 2010

Daily Fire Update - Monday, August 30, 2010

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update for Friday, August 30, 2010.


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:
No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported during the past 72 hours on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON:

The View Lake Fire, burning on the Mt. Hood National Forest, is approximately 5,876 acres and 30 percent contained. An accurate containment estimate is in the process of being determined. At 6 a.m. on Thursday, August 26, the interagency Pacific Northwest Incident Management Team 2 assumed command of this fire. More information is available on Inciweb at http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2088/ .

The Scott Mountain Fire is burning approximately two miles northeast of Scott Mountain, 15 miles west of Sisters, and 14 miles northeast of McKenzie Bridge in the Mt. Washington Wilderness Area on the Willamette National Forest. The fire is approximately 3,454 acres and 30 percent contained. The interagency Pacific Northwest Incident Management Team 3is managing this fire and more information on is available on Inciweb at http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2082/ .

The Oak Flat Fire, burning on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest in Josephine County two miles northeast of the junction of the Illinois River and Briggs Creek, about 20 miles southwest of Grants Pass, is currently estimated at 6,350 acres and is 70 percent contained. The interagency Oregon-California (ORCA) Incident Management Team is assigned to this fire and more information is available on Inciweb at http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2066/ .

The White Lightning Fire, burning on Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs lands 15 miles north of the city of Warm Springs, is currently estimated at approximately 33,732 acres and 90 percent contained. The interagency Northwest Oregon Incident Management Team was released from this fire on August 28, and the fire was turned back over to the Warm Springs Fire Management fire team. More information is available on InciWeb at http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2075/ .

***********************************************

Jeri Chase
Oregon Department of Forestry
PH: 503-945-7201
Fire Duty Offier Pager #: 503-370-0403

Friday, August 27, 2010

Fire Crew Continues to Manage Wildfire in Crater Lake National Park and Fremont-Winema National Forest

Following is the latest media relase from the Phoenix Wildland Fire:

**************************************************
August 27, 2010; 1 p.m.
Contact: Greg Funderburk
(541) 594-3062

Crater Lake, Ore – Interagency fire crews and engines continue to manage the Phoenix Wildland Fire burning an estimated 350 acres in Crater Lake National Park, with about 30 to 50 of those acres on the Fremont-Winema National Forests.

The National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife and contract crews have firefighters and equipment on scene. The following resources are presently assigned to this incident: one Type-III helicopter, nine engines, three Type-II crews and numerous other equipment.

The fire was ignited by lightning on the afternoon of August 17. It is currently burning inside Crater Lake National Park’s boundary on the east flank of Timber Crater and in an area on the Fremont-Winema National Forests between Forest Service Road 7015 and 2308. At this time, no structures are threatened and no evacuations have been reported.

The Phoenix Wildland Fire is being managed to allow fire to serve its natural role in the ecosystem and reduce hazardous fuel accumulation in the National Park. A fire suppression strategy is being implemented on the Fremont-Winema National Forests to maximize suppression efforts and firefighter safety.

Due to smoke and increase fire traffic, fire officials ask the public to use caution when driving Oregon State Highway 138 and on National Park and Forest Service roads near the fire. A cold front is expected to move through the area this weekend, bringing cooler temperatures and possible showers that could assist with firefighting efforts.

For more information about the Phoenix Wildland Fire, please contact the National Park Service at (541) 594-3062. For more information, please visit:
http://www.nps.gov/fire/.

-end-
 

Phoenix Wildland Fire, burning in Crater Lake National Park
 
**********************************************
 
Jeri Chase
Oregon Department of Forestry
PH: 503-945-7201

Daily Fire Update - Friday, August 27, 2010

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update for Friday, August 27, 2010.


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:
No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported during the past 24 hours on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON:
Picnic Creek Fire: The John Day Unit, Central Oregon District, of the Oregon Department of Forestry provided mutual aid on the Picnic Creek Fire, 8 miles west of Mt. Vernon (south of Highway 26). The fire, at approximately 20-30 acres on the jurisdiction of the Mt. Vernon Rural Protection District, started Thursday night, August 26, at approximately 5:21 PDT. High winds pushed the fire near the vicinity of 20 structures; one confirmed outbuilding, possibly two outbuildings, were destroyed. Resources on the fire Thursday night included five engines, one tender, two dozers, and one helicopter from the Oregon Department of Forestry, one engine from the U.S. Forest Service, and all of Mt. Vernon Rural Protection District resources. The Grant County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon State Police, State Fire Marshall’s Office, and Oregon Department of Transportation also contributed to the effort. The fire spread has been stopped this morning and the fire is fully lined. The cause is under investigation by the Oregon State Fire Marshal’s office.

Phoenix Wildland Fire, Crater Lake: Interagency fire crews and engines are continuing to manage this Phoenix Wildland Fire burning in timber and timber litter seven miles southeast of Diamond Lake, Oregon inside the Crater Lake National Park boundary on the east flank of Timber Crater. The fire, currently estimated at 200 acres, was ignited by lightning on the afternoon of August 17. No structures are currently threatened and no evacuations have been reported at this time. The Phoenix Wildland Fire is being managed to allow fire to serve its natural role in the ecosystem and reduce hazardous fuel accumulation. It is burning on land immediately adjacent to the Fremont-Winema National Forests. Fire crews are building a control line to prevent the fire from spreading onto National Forest land. Any ignitions that occur outside of the Crater Lake National Park boundary will be immediately suppressed. For more information, please contact the National Park Service at (541) 594-3062.

NOTE: Many of the following fires have significant active closure notices for roads, scenic areas, trails, and campgrounds in place that have been recently updated, added, or revised. For the most current information, visit the fires’ Inciweb sites where the most recent notices and maps of closure areas are posted.

The View Lake Fire, burning on the Mt. Hood National Forest, is approximately 3,037 acres. An accurate containment estimate is in the process of being determined. At 6 a.m. on Thursday, August 26, the interagency Pacific Northwest Incident Management Team 2 assumed command of this fire. More information is available on Inciweb at http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2088/ .

The Scott Mountain Fire is burning approximately two miles northeast of Scott Mountain, 15 miles west of Sisters, and 14 miles northeast of McKenzie Bridge in the Mt. Washington Wilderness Area on the Willamette National Forest. The fire is approximately 2,559 acres and five percent contained. The interagency Pacific Northwest Incident Management Team 3is managing this fire and more information on is available on Inciweb at http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2082/ .

The White Lightning Fire, burning on Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs lands 15 miles north of the city of Warm Springs, is currently estimated at approximately 33,016 acres and 40 percent contained. Effective at 6 a.m. on Friday, August 27, the Deschutes River was re-opened to recreationists. The interagency Northwest Oregon Incident Management Team is assigned to this fire and more information is available on InciWeb at http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2075/ .

The Oak Flat Fire, burning on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest in Josephine County two miles northeast of the junction of the Illinois River and Briggs Creek, about 20 miles southwest of Grants Pass, is currently estimated at 5,708 acres and is 60 percent contained. The interagency Oregon-California (ORCA) Incident Management Team is assigned to this fire and more information is available on Inciweb at http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2066/.

***************************************

Jeri Chase
Oregon Department of Forestry
PH: 503-945-7201
Fire Duty Officer Pager#: 503-370-0403

Thursday, August 26, 2010

Picnic Creek Fire News - ODF and Mt Vernon Rural

Fire News – August 26, 2010 at 8:00 p.m. PDT

Contact: Angie Johnson, Oregon Department of Forestry, (541) 620-4360

Picnic Creek Fire – Final News Release
Date Started: 8/26/2010 at 5:21 p.m. PDT
Cause of Ignition: Human (State Fire Marshall’s office is investigating cause)
Location: 8 miles west of Mt. Vernon, south of Hwy 26
Approximate Size: 20-30 acres
Percent Contained: 0%; containment expected late this evening.

Resources include:  5 engines from Oregon Department of Forestry, 1 engine from US Forest Service, and all of Mt. Vernon Rural Protection District; 1 Tender from Oregon Department of Forestry; 2 Dozers; 1 Helicopter (ODF) secured by Mt. Vernon Rural; Grant County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon State Police, State Fire Marshall’s Office, and Oregon Department of Transportation also contributed to the effort.

Protection Agency Responsible: Mt. Vernon Rural Protection District.

Additional information: Oregon Department of Forestry and US Forest Service assisted Mt. Vernon Rural Protection District with a fire in their district located in the Picnic Creek drainage, 8 miles west of Mt. Vernon. High winds pushed the fire near the vicinity of 20 structures; one confirmed outbuilding, possibly two outbuildings were destroyed. The use of engines, dozers, and a helicopter has prevented any significant fire spread at this time. Winds have died down considerably, giving crews the upper hand. Crews hope to have the fire lined later this evening. The fire is under investigation by Oregon State Fire Marshall’s office.

Weather:  With nightfall, the temperature has dropped nearly 30 degrees on the fire line. Currently it is 66 degrees. Winds have died down and relative humidity has increased.

Closures: At this time, there are no closures in place.

###

***********************************

Jeri Chase
Oregon Department of Forestry
PH: 503-945-7201
Fire Duty Officer Pager #: 503-370-0403

Daily Fire Update - Thursday, August 26, 2010

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update for Thursday, August 26, 2010.


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:
Western Lane District, ODF: The Whittaker Creek Fire, was reported at 3:30 a.m. Wednesday, August 25, burning in steep terrain on ODF-protected lands near Whittaker Creek in Lane County. Currently estimated at 15 acres, the fire has been 100 percent lined, is contained and firefighters are continuing with mop-up. The cause of this fire remains under investigation.

SPECIAL NOTICE:
OHV trails in the Tillamook State Forest RE-OPEN. Effective Thursday, August 26, 2010, the off-highway vehicle trails in the Tillamook State Forest are RE-OPEN. This includes off-highway vehicle trails in the Browns Camp, Jordan Creek, Diamond Mill, and Trask off-highway vehicle areas, and the BLM Upper Nestucca Riding Area. Fire Season Regulated Use Precautions are still in effect.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON:
There are a number of fires burning in the Cascades and several smoke columns have become and will continue to be visible.

The 950-acre Scott Mountain Fire is burning approximately two miles northeast of Scott Mountain, 15 miles west of Sisters, and 14 miles northeast of McKenzie Bridge in the Mt. Washington Wilderness Area. The interagency Pacific Northwest Incident Management Team 3 has assumed command of this fire. Smoke from the Scott Mountain Fire has impacted and will continue to impact central Oregon and was being reported yesterday as far away as the lower Santiam Canyon area just east of Salem. More information on closures and fire status is available on Inciweb at http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2082/ .

The White Lightning Fire, burning on Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs lands 15 miles north of the city of Warm Springs, is currently estimated at 29,073 acres and 30 percent contained. Portions of the Deschutes River have been re-opened to recreationists – stretches of the river from Warm Springs Boat Launch to Trout Creek Campground (River Mile 88) and downstream from Harphan Flat (River Mile 56) are now open. The remaining 32-mile closure remains in effect. The interagency Northwest Oregon Incident Management Team is assigned to this fire and more information, including Deschutes River closures, is available on InciWeb at http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2075/ .

The Oak Flat Fire, burning on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest in Josephine County two miles northeast of the junction of the Illinois River and Briggs Creek, about 20 miles southwest of Grants Pass, is currently estimated at 4,760 acres and is 75 percent contained. The interagency Oregon-California (ORCA) Incident Management Team assigned to this fire was planning to turn it back over to the forest on Saturday morning, although per a special update issued at 7 p.m. last night (August 25), high temperatures and low humidity created conditions for extreme fire behavior Wednesday afternoon, and the fire crossed over the containment line on the north side and was being wind-driven to the north. The estimated containment date has now been pushed back two more days to August 30, and additional resources (crews and helicopters) were ordered. The weather is forecast to cool some beginning today, which should moderate fire behavior, allowing firefighters to re-establish control lines. More information on closures and fire status, is available on Inciweb at http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2066/ .

Mt. Hood National Forest. Due to fire activity from the View Lake Fire, currently estimated at approximately 776 acres, the Olallie Lake Scenic Area, access to Breitenbush Lake, and portions of the Bull of the Woods Wilderness Area are closed. More information is available at http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/mthood/ .
 
*************************************
Jeri Chase
Oregon Department of Forestry
PH: 503-945-7201
Fire Duty Officer Pager #: 503-370-0403

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

Popular Off-Highway-Vehicle Trails in the Tillamook State Forest RE-OPEN

Effective Thursday, August 26, 2010, the off-highway vehicle trails in the Tillamook State Forest are RE-OPEN. This includes off-highway vehicle trails in the Browns Camp, Jordan Creek, Diamond Mill, and Trask off-highway vehicle areas, and the BLM Upper Nestucca Riding Area.  Fire Season Regulated Use Precautions are still in effect.

Thank you for helping keep the Tillamook State forest fire-safe!

*******************************************
 
Jeri Chase
Oregon Department of Forestry
PH: 503-945-7201
Fire Duty Officer Pager #: 503-370-0403

Update on Whittaker Creek Fire in Lane County

At 3:30 p.m. this afternoon (Wednesday, August 25), the Whittaker Creek Fire was approximately 15 acres.  Crews had the fire 100% lined.  One of the two helicopters that were working the fire was released and the other remained on stand-by if needed to attack any spot fires that crossed the line.  Approximately 45 personnel were still working the fire, as well as three tenders and engines - the dozer had also been released.  While weather conditions were still extreme - 90 degrees and 24 percent humidity - there was very little wind in the area and weather is forecasted to be significantly cooler tomorrow - perhaps a high of less than 70 degrees and even some possible precipitation.

********************************************

Jeri Chase
Oregon Department of Forestry
PH: 503-945-7201
Fire Duty Officer Pager #503-370-0403

Smoke reported east of Salem (lower Santiam Canyon area)

There have been several reports of smoke in the air east of Salem from Aumsville on up the Santiam Canyon past Mill City.  This is apparently as a result of the Scott Mountain Fire that is burning in the Mt. Washington Wilderness Area, approximately two miles northeast of Scott Mountain,15 miles west of Sisters, OR, and 14 miles northeast of McKenzie Bridge.  More information on this fire is available on Inciweb at:
http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2082/ .

**************************************

Jeri Chase
Oregon Department of Forestry
PH: 503-945-7201
Fire Duty Officer Pager #: 503-370-0403

ODF Daily Fire Update, Wednesday, August 25, 2010

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update for Wednesday, August 25, 2010.


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:
Western Lane District, ODF: The Whittaker Creek Fire was reported at 3:30 a.m. today, Wednesday, August 25, burning in steep terrain on ODF-protected lands near Whittaker Creek in Lane County. Currently estimated at 18-20 acres, there are 10 engines, 3 crews, 2 tenders, and 2 dozers assigned to the fire which is under investigation.

Forest Grove District, ODF: The Masonville Fire, burning in a straw field at Masonville Road and Highway 18 in Yamhiill County, was reported on ODF-protected lands on Tuesday afternoon, August 24. ODF resources, including four engines, responded, containing the fire by mid-afternoon at approximately 11 acres, and it was turned back over to the landowner for further fire watch.

OHV trails in the Tillamook State Forest are CLOSED. Due to increased fire danger, effective at 12:01 a.m., Tuesday, August 24, 2010, the off-highway vehicle trails in the Tillamook State Forest are CLOSED. Off-highway vehicle activity in the Browns Camp, Jordan Creek, Diamond Mill, and Trask off-highway vehicle areas will be limited to operation on maintained forest roads only.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON:
Southwest Oregon District, ODF, Mutual Aid: The Oregon Department of Forestry assisted Ashland Fire and Rescue late yesterday afternoon and into the evening (August 24) on a fire that burned on City of Ashland jurisdiction that ultimately destroyed 11 homes and damaged 2 others. There have been no reports so far of any injuries. ODF resources on the fire included two helicopters from the Medford Tanker Base, numerous engines, and a dozer. The Rogue Valley Structural Fire Department also assisted on the fire.

The fire started at approximately 4:45 p.m. in a grassy field on the west side of I-5 near a freeway interchange for South Ashland. Winds at that time were gusty and the fire jumped the freeway, crossing over to the east side, where it then burned in scrub and oak up a hill, and into the residential area. As of about 8:30 p.m. last night, ODF resources were released and the fire remains in the primary jurisdiction of Ashland Fire and Rescue. More information on this fire is available on the City of Ashland’s website at http://www.ashland.or.us/index.asp .

Tillamook District, ODF, Mutual Aid: The Cabin Fire, burning on U.S. Forest Service lands near Cape Kiwanda and Sand Lake, was reported at approximately 2 p.m. on Tuesday, August 24. The fire burned 2.1 acres, and originally possibly threatened the near-by Thousand Trails Campground and some structures in the area. ODF resources, including a helicopter, engines, and crews, responded, as well as U.S. Forest Service resources and local Rural Fire Districts. The fire is 100 percent lined and in mop-up. All ODF resources have been released and the fire has been completely turned over to the U.S. Forest Service.

The 600-acre Scott Mountain Fire is burning approximately two miles northeast of Scott Mountain, 15 miles west of Sisters, and 14 miles northeast of McKenzie Bridge. The fire was ignited by lightning during last week's storm, but did not become active until warm winds influenced it on Monday, August 23, when it started running, spotting, crowning, and torching, growing from approximately five to 200 acres in three hours. A closure area is in effect that includes Forest Service roads east of Highway 126, many of which access trailheads into the Mt. Washington wilderness. Additionally, Scott Lake and Alder Springs campgrounds are closed and visitors have been required to leave, and several trails in the area have also been closed. The interagency Pacific Northwest Incident Management Team 3 has assumed command of this fire this morning. More information on t his fire is available on Inciweb at http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2082/ .

The White Lightning Fire, burning on Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs lands, is currently estimated at 29,073 acres and 30 percent contained Monday. The Deschutes River is closed to rafting from Warm Springs to Maupin. The Northwest Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team is assigned to this fire and updates are available through InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2075/ .

The Oak Flat Fire, burning on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest in Josephine County two miles northeast of the junction of the Illinois River and Briggs Creek, about 20 miles southwest of Grants Pass, is currently estimated at 4,760 acres and is 75 percent contained. The interagency Oregon-California (ORCA) incident management team assigned to this fire is planning to turn it back over to the forest on Saturday morning. A road, trail, and campground closure is still in effect. Updates on the fire are available through InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2066/

Mt. Hood National Forest: Due to fire activity, the Olallie Lake Scenic Area, access to Breitenbush Lake, and portions of the Bull of the Woods Wilderness Area are closed. More information is available at http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/mthood/.

************************************

Jeri Chase
Oregon Department of Forestry
PH: 503-945-7201
Fire Duty Officer Pager #503-370-0403

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

ODF assists on urban interface fire near Ashland

Roca Canyon Fire: The Oregon Department of Forestry assisted Ashland Fire and Rescue late this afternoon and into this evening (August 24) on an urban interface fire burning near Ashland that ultimately destroyed 11 homes and damaged 2 others.  There have been no reports so far of any injuries.  ODF resources on the fire included two helicopters from the Medford Tanker Base, numerous engines, and a dozer.  The Rogue Valley Structural Fire Department also assisted on the fire.

The fire started at approximately 4:45 p.m. today in a grassy field on the west side of I-5 near a freeway interchange for South Ashland. Winds at that time were gusty and the fire jumped the freeway, crossing over to the east side, where it then burned in scrub and oak up a hill, and into the residential area.  As of about 8:30 p.m., ODF resources were being released and the fire remains in the primary jurisdiction of Ashland Fire and Rescue.

***************************

Jeri Chase
Oregon Department of Forestry
PH: 503-945-7201
Fire Duty Officer Pager #503-370-0403

Afternoon ODF Update

Tillamook District, ODF:  The Cabin Fire, burning on U.S. Forest Service lands near Cape Kiwanda and Sand Lake, was reported at approximately 2 p.m. on Tuesday, August 24.  The fire, approximately 1-2 acres, possibly threatened the near-by Thousand Trails Campground and some structures in the area. ODF resources, including a helicopter, engines, and crews, responded, as well as U.S. Forest Services resources and local Rural Fire Districts.  At 3:30 p.m., district staff were anticipating no further threat and planning to release the ODF-contracted helopter and beginning mop-up by around 4 p.m.

Forest Grove District, ODF: The Masonville Fire, burning in a straw field at Masonville Road and Highway 18 in Yamhiill County, was reported on ODF-protected lands on Tuesday afternoon, August 24.  ODF resources, including four engines, responded, containing the fire by mid-afternoon at approximately 11 acres, and it was turned over to the landowner for further fire watch.

**************************

Jeri Chase
Oregon Department of Forestry
PH: 503-945-7201
Fire Duty Officer Pager #: 503-370-0403

Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update for Tuesday, August 24, 2010.


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:

Central Oregon District – John Day Unit: The Long Box Fire, reported on August 23, 2010, six miles east of Dayville and north of Highway 26, is 100 percent lined, with containment expected today. Agencies involved included the Mt. Vernon Rural Fire Department, State Fire Marshall’s Office, and the Oregon Department of Transportation. Aircraft and engine crews responded as private land and the Phillip W. Schneider Wildlife Area operated by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife was threatened, including one residence and three other structures. The fire spread was stopped at about 6:30 p.m. on August 23, at 48 acres, with retardant and helicopter bucket drops. An engine patrolled the fire overnight for hot spots, and two engines and a 20-person hand crew are currently conducting mop-up activities, as well as continuing to patrol for hot-spots. Unless the situation changes, this will be the only report on this fire.

OHV trails in the Tillamook State Forest are CLOSED. Due to increased fire danger, effective at 12:01 a.m., Tuesday, August 24, 2010, the off-highway vehicle trails in the Tillamook State Forest are CLOSED. Off-highway vehicle activity in the Browns Camp, Jordan Creek, Diamond Mill, and Trask off-highway vehicle areas will be limited to operation on maintained forest roads only.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON:

The 200-acre Scott Mountain Fire is burning approximately two miles northeast of Scott Mountain, 15 miles west of Sisters, and 14 miles northeast of McKenzie Bridge. The fire was ignited by lightning during last week's storm, but did not become active until warm winds influenced it on Monday, August 23, when it started running, spotting, crowning, and torching, growing from approximately five to 200 acres in three hours. The interagency Pacific Northwest Incident Management Team 3 has been ordered to assume management of this fire.

A closure area is in effect that includes Forest Service roads east of Highway 126, many of which access trailheads into the Mt. Washington wilderness. Additionally, Scott Lake and Alder Springs campgrounds are closed and visitors have been required to leave, and several trails in the area have also been closed. More information on this fire is available on Inciweb at http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2082/ .

The White Lightning Fire, burning on Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs lands, is currently estimated at 24,397 acres and 10 percent contained Monday. The Deschutes River is closed to rafting from Warm Springs to Maupin. The Northwest Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team is assigned to this fire and updates are available through InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2075/ .

The Oak Flat Fire continues to burn in the Rogue River National Forest in Josephine County two miles northeast of the junction of the Illinois River and Briggs Creek, about 20 miles southwest of Grants Pass. The fire is currently estimated at 4,363 acres and is 65 percent contained. The interagency Oregon-California (ORCA) incident management team is assigned to this fire. A road, trail, and campground closure is still in effect. Updates on the fire are available through InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2066/ .

Mt. Hood National Forest: Due to fire activity, the Olallie Lake Scenic Area, access to Breitenbush Lake, and portions of the Bull of the Woods Wilderness Area are closed. More information is available at http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/mthood/.

**********************************

Jeri Chase, Oregon Department of Forestry
PH: 503-945-7201; Fire Duty Officer Pager # 503-370-0403

Long Box fire fully contained; final news release

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY FIRE NEWS
John Day Unit

Fire News – August 23, 2010 at 9:30 p.m. PDT
Contact: Angie Johnson, Oregon Department of Forestry, (541) 620-4360

Long Box Fire – Final News Release

Date Started: 8/23/2010
Cause of Ignition: Human (vehicle fire)
Location: 6 miles east of Dayville, north of Hwy 26
Final Size: 48 acres
Percent Contained: 100% lined with dozer; containment expected by end of shift tomorrow.

Resources include:

4 Oregon Department of Forestry Engines; 2 Tenders - 1 Mt. Vernon Rural Tender and 1 Oregon Department of Forestry Tender; 1 Oregon Department of Forestry Dozer (operated by Oregon Department of Transportation); 2 Single Engine Air Tankers; 2 Helicopters; 1 Heavy Air Tanker

Agencies Involved: Oregon Department of Forestry, Mt. Vernon Rural Fire Department, State Fire Marshall’s Office, and Oregon Department of Transportation

Additional information:

Monday’s activities - Aircraft and engine crews responded to a fire near Dayville, north of Highway 26. Private land and Phillip W. Schneider Wildlife Area (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife) threatened, including 1 residence and 3 other structures. The fire spread was stopped around 6:30 p.m. this evening with retardant and helicopter bucket drops; the fire was lined with a dozer by 8:30 p.m. An engine will patrol the fire overnight for hot spots.

Tuesday’s activities – 2 engines and a 20-person hand crew will be on the fire conducting mop-up activities, as well as continuing patrol for hot spots.

Weather:
Clear skies and higher temperatures are expected through Wednesday.

Closures:
At this time, there are no closures in place.

Monday, August 23, 2010

Update on Longbox Fire

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY FIRE NEWS

John Day Unit

Fire News – August 23, 2010 at 5:30 p.m. PDT
Contact: Angie Johnson, Oregon Department of Forestry, (541) 620-4360

Longbox Fire -

Date Started: 8/23/2010
Cause of Ignition: Human, Under Investigation
Location: 6 miles east of Dayville, north of Hwy 26
Size: approximately 15 acres
Percent Contained: 0%

Resources include:

4 Oregon Department of Forestry Engines, 2 Tenders - 1 Mt. Vernon Rural Tender and 1 Oregon Department of Forestry Tender, 1 Oregon Department of Forestry Dozer (operated by Oregon Department of Transportation), 2 Single Engine Air Tankers, 2 Helicopters, 1 Heavy Air Tanker

Agencies Involved: Oregon Department of Forestry, Mt. Vernon Rural Fire Department, and Oregon Department of Transportation

Additional information:

Aircraft and engine crews have responded to a fire near Long Box Ranch, off of Highway 26. Private land and Phillip W. Schneider Wildlife Area (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife) threatened, including 1 residence and 3 other structures. Crews intend on corralling fire burning in grass, brush, and Juniper late this evening. Crews will work through the night in order to stop fire spread. Primary safety concerns include steep, rocky terrain and poor access.

Weather:
Current weather will be favorable. Temperature on fire is 78 degrees with 20% relative humidity. Winds are 0-5 mph out of the west.

Closures:
At this time, there are no closures in place.

FOR UPDATED FIRE SEASON CLOSURE INFORMATION ON PRIVATE LAND, PEASE VISIT:
http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/FIELD/JD/aboutus.shtml

TO REPORT A WILDFIRE:
Call John Day Interagency Dispatch Center at (541) 575-1321.

White Lightning Complex update

Source: Northwest Oregon Area Interagency Incident Management Team

The stated size of theWhite Lightning Complex fire was increased to 24,397 acres Monday, reflecting Saturday's rapid fire spread and more timely processing of mapping data.

Portions of the Deschutes River have been reopened to recreationists. Stretches of the river from Warm Springs Boat Launch to Trout Creek Campground (river mile 88) and downstream from Harphan Flat (river mile 56) are now open

The remaining 32-mile closure is in effect between Trout Creek Recreation Area (river mile 88) and Harphan Flat Recreation Area (river mile 56).

It has been verified that a cabin and outbuilding at Johnson Flat were destroyed by the fire on Saturday. Also, the BLM compost toilet facility at river mile 63 was burned. All other structures in the Dant area remain intact.

Mop up and patrol of fires on the west side of Highway 3 continues.

Fire at a Glance (8/23/10)

Size: 24,397 acres
Location: 15 miles north of Warm Springs, Oregon
Containment: 10%
Cause: Lightning on August 17th
Number of Personnel Assigned: 903

Evacuations: Level 3 (time to leave) - remains in effect for 8 cabins in the Dant area.

Closures/Restrictions:

The Deschutes River is closed to rafting between Trout Creek Campground and Harphan Flat Recreation Area.

www.inciweb.org/inciweb/2075/

WhiteLightningComplex@Yahoo.com

Longbox Fire burning in Grant County

Four engines from the ODF John Day Unit are battling the Longbox Fire, burning six miles east of Dayville in the Schoolhouse Gulch area of Grant County. The fire, reported Monday afternoon, has consumed an estimated 15 acres of grass/juniper/sagebrush and is continuing to burn Monday. Cause of the fire is currently under investigation. Private landowner equipment is assisting with what is expected to be an extended attack on the fire Monday evening. In addition to assistance from a water tender and bulldozer on the ground, aerial attack on the fire is provided by 2 small single engine air tankers, an ODF large air tanker and two helicopters.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

New fire in Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest

Contact: Paul Galloway, Rogue River-Siskiyou NF Acting Public Affairs Officer, 541-618-2113


Monday, August 23, 2010, 10 a.m. – A wildfire was spotted yesterday burning in a remote area of the Gold Beach Ranger District of the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest. The Cedar Creek Fire has grown to an estimated 70 acres this morning as smokejumpers will be reinforced with four additional handcrews, and helicopter water drops.

The Cedar Creek Fire was initially reported by aerial reconnaissance Sunday at noon and estimated to be 2 acres at that time. The fire is located two miles west of Sourdough Camp and two miles north of the Oregon-California state line. Burning in grass and brush with pockets of heavy timber, twenty smokejumpers, two air tankers, and helicopters assigned to the Oak Flat Fire were deployed yesterday to attack the fire.

Today crews will work to establish a fire line around the fire and helicopters will be used to cool hot spots. Air tanker support will again be available. A Red Flag Warning has been posted for the area until Tuesday morning for high winds and low humidity.

An Incident Command Post has been established at the Coos Forest Protective Association compound in Brookings, and the Winchuck Campground will be utilized as a spike camp for the crews. Helicopter and some logistical support for the Cedar Creek Fire will be provided by some resources currently assigned to the Oak Flat Fire burning on the Wild Rivers Ranger District.

The public is warned to avoid using the Sourdough Trail (#1114) from Sourdough Camp to Packsaddle Mountain at this time.

Red Flag Warning in effect for much of SW Oregon tonight

The National Weather Service in Medford has issued a Red Flag Warning in effect from 11:00 Monday night until 11:00 Tuesday morning for most fire zones in eastern Curry, Josephine and Jackson counties. A major exception to the warning area is Fire Zone 622 – generally the Medford metro area north to the Shady Cove area – not being included in the Red Flag Warning.

Very strong winds in the nighttime hours paired with very low humidity will increase fire potential overnight. Eastern winds of 5-15 MPH with gusts as high as 30 MPH on ridges are forecast

A Red Flag Warning is issued when weather forecasters detect conditions which create a higher than normal potential of fire activity for a limited timeframe is either underway or imminent.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Satellite image of Oak Flat fire

The skies about SW Oregon were clear enough Sunday for NASA’s MODIS land imagery system to get a good look at the Oak Flat fire burning near Grants Pass.

Satellite images help fire managers understand the behavior of fires, establish very accurate acreage counts, alert air quality agencies about potential smoke drift, and provides additional valuable data.

For the full scale Sunday afternoon MODIS sweep photograph of the northwestern US and Canada, go to:
http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/subsets/?subset=USA1.2010234.terra.1km

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Morning status report for ODF

No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF-protected lands were reported to the Salem Coordination Center in the past 24 hours.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

White Lightning and Oak Flat updates

Source: NW Coordinating Center and InciWeb

The White Lightning Fire burning on Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs lands is currently estimated at 24,397 acres and 10 percent contained Monday, according to the NW Coordinating Center. The complex fire includes the Youther, Island Rim, Johnson Lake, Laughlin Hills, and Youth Spot fires, burning on Warm Springs Agency lands. Numerous scattered residences are throughout fire areas. Concerns have also been expressed about the Johnson Lake and Island Rib fires moving towards the Kah-nee-ta Resort. Deschutes River closed to rafting from Warm Springs to Maupin. Updates on the fire are available through InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2075/


The Oak Flat fire continues to burn in the Rogue River National Forest in Josephine County two miles northeast of the junction of the Illinois River and Briggs Creek, about 20 miles southwest of Grants Pass. The fire is currently estimated at 3,305 acres and is 55 percent contained. Cause of the fire, which is under the command of a federal Oregon-California (ORCA) incident management team, is under investigation. No private lands or structures are immediately threatened by this fire. A road, trail, and campground closure is still in effect. Updates on the fire are available through InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2066/

Lower Deschutes Complex fires contained Sunday

Source: Central Oregon Incident Management Team.

The management of the Lower Deschutes Complex fires will transfer back to the local BLM unit Monday. Resources that have been determined as excess will be released and reassigned to the neighboring White Lightning Complex.

The Deschutes River is closed from Warm Springs put-in down through Harpham Flat due to the Youther Fire. For more information on this fire see the following link: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2075

Devils Half Acre (1,245 acres) and Fall Canyon (2,702 acres) - Firefighters will continue to patrol. The one smoke located today on the Fall Canyon Fire was mopped-up.

Oak Canyon (640 acres) and Tygh Ridge (4,717 acres) - Patrol by aircraft. The one smoke that was located today on the Oak Canyon Fire was mopped-up.

QUICK FACTS:

Acres: 9,304
Containment: 100%
Location: 5 miles north of Maupin
Cause: Lightning
Start Date/Time: Reported August 19, 2010, 1015 hrs
Total personnel: 319
Crews: 7; Engines: 14; Helicopters: 1-light,1- medium, 1-heavy lift; Water tenders:6; and Overhead: 78

Sunday, August 22, 2010

Lower Deschutes Complex fires 90 percent contained; some evacuated

Source: Central Oregon Incident Management Team


Due to the direction and rapid growth Saturday of the Youther Fire, a fire of the White Lightning Complex burning on the Warm Spring Reservation, homes on the east side of the Deschutes River near Dant were evacuated by the Oregon State Police with assistance from Bureau of Land Management (BLM) law enforcement. An operational contingency plan has been developed to locate firefighting resources from the Lower Deschutes Complex into this area to hold any fire that might cross the river.

The BLM has closed the Deschutes River Segment 1 from Trout Creek down through Harpham Flat due to the Youther Fire. For more information on this fire see the following link: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2075

FIRE ACTIVITY:

Strong, gusty west winds tested containment lines on all four fires yesterday of the Lower Deschutes Complex. All containment lines held. Although the Complex is in patrol mode, some smoke may be visible due to burning of interior islands of fuel.

Devils Half Acre (1,200 acres) and Fall Canyon (2,700 acres) - Firefighters will patrol and mop-up any smokes 50 ft into the interior.

Oak Canyon (600 acres) and Tygh Ridge (4,700 acres) - Patrol by aircraft.

Transition from the federal Central Oregon Incident Management Team back to management by the local BLM unit is scheduled for Monday, August 23, at 6 am.

QUICK FACTS:

Acres: 9,200
Containment: 90%
Location: 5 miles north of Maupin
Cause: Lightning
Start Date/Time: Reported August 19, 2010, 1015 hrs
Total personnel: 318Crews: 8; Engines: 10; Helicopters: 1-light,1- medium, 1-heavy lift; Water tenders: 4; and Overhead: 78

More information is available through InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2073/

View Lake fire in the Mt. Hood National Forest; road closures

Source: NW Coordination Center, Portland

The U S Forest Service is currently responding to the View Lake fire near Estacada, and on Sunday size is estimated at 125 acres. This area is in the Bull of the Woods Wilderness Area and is a high recreational use area. An area closure is in effect for the Olallie Lakes recreation area.


All campgrounds and trails are closed within the Olallie Lake Scenic Area including a portion of the Pacific Crest Trail. Road blocks have been set up at the junction of Forest Road 46 and Road 4220, and also at the junction of Road 4690 and Road 4220. Travel/access to Breitenbush Lake is not possible.

Additional information on the fire:
http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/mthood/

Oak Flat Sunday AM update

The Oak Flat fire continues burning on federal forest 10 miles NW of Selma in Josephine County. The fire is currently 2,950 acres in size and 40 percent contained. Cause of the fire remains under investigation. Updated information is available through InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2066/

White Lightning Complex Wildfire update

Source: Warm Springs Agency / InciWeb


The White Lightning Complex consists of seven lightning-caused fires on the Warm Springs Reservation 30 miles north-northwest of Madras, Oregon. The total estimated size of the combined fires is 5,680 acres or nearly nine square miles. The fires are burning in dry grass, sage, juniper and pockets of pine and oak in rocky, rugged terrain.

The White Lightning Complex is being managed by the Northwest Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team. The Incident Command Post is located at the Fire Management Complex in Warm Springs.

http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2075/

Fire at a Glance:

Size: 5,680 Acres - 7 Fires
Location: 15 miles north of Warm Springs, Oregon
Containment: 5%
Cause: Lightning
Number of Personnel Assigned: 362

Evacuations: Level 2 - Prepare to Evacuate - Involving 19 residences

Closures/Restrictions:

Hwy 3 North of Simnasho

Residents to the east and southeast of Simnasho, with homes along the S-300 and S-310 roads, are being advised to prepare to evacuate in case of significant fire growth this afternoon.

Gusty winds battered the fire during the night, and active burning was reported. Winds are again expected Sunday. The fire is burning in dry grass, sage, juniper and pockets of pine and oak in rocky rugged terrain.

The White Lightning Complex is now being managed by the Northwest Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team. The center of operations for the Incident Management Team is located at the Fire Management Complex in Warm Springs.

Dry conditions exist in most of Oregon and fire danger is high. Please use all fire safety precautions while enjoying the last days of summer.

White Lightning Complex Information Desk: WhiteLightningComplex@yahoo.com

Saturday, August 21, 2010

Oak Flat, White Lightning fires continue

The Oak Flat fire is burning on federal forest 10 miles NW of Selma in Josephine County. The fire is currently 2,100 acres in size and 25 percent contained. Cause of the fire remains under investigation. Updated information is available through InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2066/

White Lightning fire is burning on Confederated Tribe of Warm Springs owned-land in central Oregon. Fire is currently estimated at 4,500 acres.

Lower Deschutes Complex fires update

Source: Central Oregon Incident Management Team

Firefighters made significant progress Friday to reduce the threat of the fires and therefore prompted fire managers and Bureau of Land Management Officials to reopen the Deschutes River Saturday morning. This also allowed reductions to the preparatory evacuation notice levels.


Activity on fires:

Fall Canyon - Firefighters worked all flanks of the fire from the top to the bottom mopping up into the fire interior 50 feet from the edge working in. The perimeter held throughout Friday.

Oak Canyon - Heat continued to build in the late afternoon near the bottom of the fire. Firefighters utilized helicopter bucket drops to cool the area. Very steep terrain continues to challenge on the ground resources.

Tygh Ridge - The private landowner constructed dozer lines continue to hold. The fire is being patrolled with aerial resources.

Devils Half Acre - The northeast flank developed some heat in the later part of the day but held within containment lines. Helicopters assisted firefighters with several rounds of water drops to cool the area.

Air resources are operating from the helibase in Tygh Valley. Three helicopters were released Friday for reassignment to other incidents.

The weather forecastSaturday is calling for cooler temperatures of 80 degrees with relative humidity of 20-25% and north-northwest winds of 10 - 15 mph with possible gusty winds to 30 mph in the afternoon.

QUICK FACTS:

Acres: 5,700
Containment: 60%
Location: 5 miles north of Maupin
Cause: Lightning
Start Date/Time: Reported August 19, 2010, 1015 hrs
Total personnel: 318
Crews: 8; Engines: 12; Helicopters: 1-light,1- medium, 1-heavy lift; Water tenders: 4; and Overhead: 70

Lower Deschutes Complex; Threat passes for Maupin

Source: Central Oregon Incident Management Team

Due to the significant progress made by firefighters Friday the notice urging residents in Maupin to prepare for precautionary evacuation will be removed this morning effective 6:00am.

The ordered closure of the Oak Springs Fish Hatchery and White River State Park will be reduced to a Level One prepare for precautionary evacuations order on Saturday morning. The State will be open to the public Saturday. The Deschutes River Segment 2 will be opened to recreational activities Saturday morning at 6:00. This includes the campgrounds that were previously closed due to fire suppression activities.

Additional information is available through InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2073/

COIMT Information Desk 541-467-3001

Friday, August 20, 2010

Red Flag Warning for the Klamath Basin on Saturday

The National Weather Service in Medford has issued a Red Flag Warning indicating increased fire potential for the southern half of Klamath and Lake Counties, extending into northern California, in effect from Noon Saturday until 9:00pm Saturday.

On Saturday, sustained SW winds of 15 to 25 MPH are forecast with gusts to 35 MPH; Afternoon relative humidity in the region will range from 10-20 percent. Seasonal summer temperatures combined with high winds and low humidity will create a critical fire weather situation on Saturday afternoon and evening.

A Red Flag Warning means that critical fire weather conditions are occurring now or will shortly, creating high fire potential.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Update on Lower Deschutes Complex Wildfire

Source: Central Oregon Incident Management Team

The lower portion of Segment 2 of the Deschutes River will re-open for public use at 6:00 am Saturday morning August 21. For more information please contact the incident information Center

Residences at the Oak Springs Fish Hatchery were evacuated however hatchery staff continues operations as usual, although the facility is closed to the public. White River State Park, a day use park, is also closed.

For updated information on the Lower Deschutes Complex Wildfire, go to InciWeb at: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2073/

COIMT Information Center
Phone: 541-467-3001

State Fire Marshal incident team prepares to demobilize

Oregon State Fire Marshal's Office - News Release

Structural task forces from Multnomah and Washington Hood River counties are being demobilized from the D. Harris Conflagration due to the decreasing threat to structures in the area. The Oregon State Fire Marshal Red Incident Management Team will turn control of the fire back to the local fire district for structural protection today at 6:00 p.m.


The D Harris Fire began August 18 in the Juniper Flat Fire Protection District. The fire is located approximately five miles southwest of the City of Maupin, Oregon and estimated to be 3,800 acres.

Residents in Maupin should remain on alert for possible evacuation should conditions worsen.

Governor Kulongoski invoked the Oregon Conflagration Act to allow State Fire Marshal Randy Simpson to mobilize firefighters and equipment to assist local resources battling the fire. The request to invoke the conflagration act came from Wasco County Assistant Fire Defense Board Chief Jay Wood.

News Release - White Lightning Complex

The Oregon Department of Forestry is providing mutual aid on several of the fires in what is being called the White Lightning Complex in Central Oregon.  Following is a news release about this complex that was issued this afternoon.

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WHITE LIGHTNING COMPLEX

As of 1200 (12:00 noon), Friday, August 20, 2010

Approximate start time: 2100 (9:00 p.m.) on Tuesday, August 17, 2010

Background: There were 400 lightning strikes on Tuesday evening causing 28 fire starts to-date. Most were small fires but five developed into larger fires due to dry weather conditions and winds.

Island Rim Fire: Located on the flat between the Warm Springs River and Beaver Creek south of Tribal Highway 9 that runs from US Highway 26 to Simnasho. Approximately 1,000 acres of rangeland, it threatened one home and several water developments, and burned one out building.

Johnson Lake Fire: Located about 2 miles south of Simnasho on the west side of Tribal Highway 3 on Schoolie Flat. Approximately 2,500 acres of rangeland, this fire threatened numerous homes. In addition to wildland fire fighters, the Central Oregon Structural Protection Task Force III (Warm Springs Fire and Safety, Jefferson County Fire District, Crook County Fire District and Crooked River Ranch Fire District) assisted in protecting homes and other structures. No losses were reported. A Level II Evacuation Order was in place for a voluntary evacuation of the area.

Youther Fire: Located east of Tribal Highway 3 about 6 miles northeast of Simnasho on the northeastern boundary of the reservation, approximately 6 miles northwest of Dant on the Deschutes River and about 4 miles south of the community of Wapinitia to the north of the reservation. Approximately 1,200 acres in rangeland and scrub oak county. Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) is assisting with this fire as portions are on lands protected off the reservation by the department.

Nelson Fire: Located about 1 to 2 miles east/northeast of the Youther Fire also in rangeland and scrub oak county. This fire reactivated about 0620 (6:20 a.m.) this morning and is moving north/northeast down Nena Creek canyon. It is approximately 1,500 acres and growing. Additional crews are being dispatched to that fire. ODF is assisting with this fire.

Laughlin Hills II Fire: Located west of Tribal Highway 3 about 6 miles northeast of Simnasho on the northeastern boundary of the reservation, about 2 miles west of the Youther Fire in forested country. Approximately 2,000 acres in size, crews are back burning from Highway 3 on the eastern flank to help control the fire and hoping to hold the northern line. ODF is assisting with this fire.

Road Closures: Due to safety concerns and fire traffic, Tribal Highway 3 is closed at the Kah-Nee-Ta Road junction (Tribal Highway 8) north to mile post 33 at the northern boundary of the reservation, and at the Simnasho junction of Tribal highways 3 and 9. Only Schoolie Flat residents and employees of the Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery are allowed in the area.

Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort and Casino remains open. Those coming from the north and wanting to reach the resort and casino are encouraged to continue south on US Highway 26 past the Simnasho turnoff (Tribal Highway 9) into Warm Springs and take Tribal Highway 3 north to Kah-Nee-Ta.

Total personnel: Approximately 350

Resources: 12 crews, six smokejumpers, 20 engines, eight tenders, 2 dozers, three helicopters, three planes, and 20 overhead personnel. Additional crews, engines, tenders, dozers and overhead personnel are on order.

Incident Command: Being managed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs and the Warm Springs Agency of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The Warm Springs Police Department is assisting. A Type II Incident Command Team will arrive this afternoon to take over the complex so local fire fighters can return to initial attach duties.

Contact: Clay Penhollow, Fire Information Officer at 553-2413.

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Jeri Chase, Oregon Department of Forestry
PH: 503-945-7201

Forestry officials hunt down fires, appeal to public to use caution

The Oregon Department of Forestry issued this news release today:


August 20, 2010
Contact: Kevin Weeks, 503-689-6879


Forestry officials urged recreationists and local residents to exercise extreme caution with fire Friday as efforts continued to find and put out fires from a swarm of lightning strikes earlier this week.

More than 1,200 lightning strikes pummeled forestland in eastern Lane and Linn counties on Tuesday. Lightning-caused fires can simmer deep in the forest for days before rapidly growing large enough to detect.

“We expect to find more ‘sleeper’ fires every afternoon as the clouds lift and the sun warms up the ground,” said Lena Tucker, district forester in the Oregon Department of Forestry’s South Cascade District.

“We always urge the public to be cautious in using fire, but that is doubly important now, when the response to the lightning storms is stretching resources very thin.”

The Oregon Department of Forestry, the U.S. Forest Service, other firefighting agencies, and forest landowners are all making essential contributions. “The whole system is coordinated and working well,” Tucker said. “But it will take some time to find all the fires.”

The Oregon Department of Forestry protects about 1.3 million acres of forestland in its South Cascade District, which has offices in Springfield and Sweet Home. The Forest Service has fire protection responsibility on the Willamette National Forest.

On private lands, Tucker said, “Landowners have been actively patrolling their ownerships and notifying us of any smoke they detect. We could not cover all the land we protect if they were not assisting us.” Landowners also take direct fire suppression action.

The lightning sweep has caused at least five fires, all stopped at less than an acre, on state-protected land. The Willamette National Forest has reported about 125 lightning-caused fire starts.

“We expect cool weather over the weekend, but we’d like to remind people to be careful with fire, particularly with recreational campfires.”

Public use restrictions are in effect in the area. These include:

1. Smoking is prohibited while traveling, except in vehicles on improved roads, in boats on the water, and on sand or gravel bars that lie between water and high water marks that are free of vegetation.
2. Open fires are prohibited, including campfires, charcoal fires, cooking fires and warming fires, except at designated locations. Portable cooking stoves using liquefied or bottled fuels are allowed.
3. Chain saw use is prohibited in areas subject to Industrial Fire Precaution Level III and IV.
4. Chain saw use is prohibited, between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m., in areas subject to Industrial Fire Precaution Level I and II. Chain saw use is permitted at all other hours, if the following fire fighting equipment is present with each operating saw: one axe, one shovel, and one operational 8 ounce or larger fire extinguisher. In addition, a fire watch is required at least one 1 hour following the use of each saw.
5. Use of motorized vehicles, including motorcycles and all terrain vehicles, is prohibited, except on improved roads or for the commercial culture and harvest of agricultural crops.
6. All motor vehicles must be equipped with one gallon of water or one operational 2½ pound or larger fire extinguisher, one axe, and one shovel, except when traveling on state and county roads. All-terrain vehicles and motorcycles must be equipped with one operational 2½ pound or larger fire extinguisher, except when traveling on state and county roads."
7. Use of fireworks is prohibited.
8. Cutting, grinding and welding of metal is prohibited, between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. Cutting, grinding and welding of metal is permitted at all other hours, if conducted in a cleared area and if a water supply is present.
9. Use of exploding targets is prohibited.
10. Mowing of dried and cured grass with power driven equipment is prohibited, between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m., except for the commercial culture and harvest of agricultural crops.
11. Blasting is prohibited between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. Blasting is permitted at all other hours, if conducted in a cleared area and if a water supply is present.

To report a wildfire, people should call 911.

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Jeri Chase, Oregon Department of Forestry
PH: 503-945-7201

Update on State Fire Marshal incident team deployment

Oregon State Fire Marshal's Office - News Release

The D Harris Fire began yesterday 8/19/2010 in the Juniper Flat Fire Protection District. At present, members of the Oregon State Fire Marshal's Office Red Incident Management Team are assessing the extent of the fire and reports of destroyed structures.


The fire is located approximately five miles southwest of the City of Maupin, Oregon and estimated to be 3,800 acres. However, a more accurate estimate will be available later in the day.

The fire is burning in grass, juniper, and pine tree stands with dramatic rates of spread yesterday afternoon due to warm temperatures, low humidity, and gusty winds. Weather for today is expected to produce similar conditions as Thursday.

Residents in Maupin are on a level 1 evacuation alert advising them to prepare for possible evacuation should conditions worsen.

The Oregon State Fire Marshal Office Red Incident Management Team is assigned to the incident and has assumed Command early Friday morning. Task Forces from Hood River, Multnomah, and Washington counties are assigned to the incident.

The structural incident command post and base camp is located at Maupin High School. The incident information officer will be making contact with members of the community today to address any concerns.

Jackson/Josephine County: Three new small fires doused on Thursday

Three new fires were found yesterday afternoon on ODF Southwest Oregon District-protected lands. Combined, the fires amounted to one acre and were contained quickly.

The Summit Prairie Fire, located 7 miles north of Butte Falls, amounted to .25 acre. A helicopter dropped buckets of water on the fire while engines dug hand line around the perimeter and mopped up the scene.

Nine miles north of Gold Hill, the Holcomb Springs Fire was .50 acre. The perimeter is 100% lined and crews are continuing to mop up.

Last night crews continued to work on the 0.25 acre Sykes Creek Fire. The fire ignited during the lightning bust earlier this week and is now 100% lined and mopped.

A reconnaissance flight is being made this morning in search of new smokes. Lookouts will continue to be fully staffed throughout the weekend.

For wildfire prevention information visit http://www.rvfpc.com/  or visit our blog site at http://swofire.blogspot.com/

To report a fire, call 9-1-1.

Ashley Du Brey - Oregon Department of Forestry, SW Oregon District

Morning status report for ODF

No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF-protected lands were reported to ODF's Salem Coordination Center overnight.

ODF staff in service Friday

Oregon Department of Forestry offices remain open on August 20 to ensure adequate fire protection resources are available statewide. Many State of Oregon agencies are closed today due to budget reductions. ODF was exempted from statewide agency closure dates during fire season so that wildfire response, which protects public safety, natural resources and property, could continue uninterrupted. To ensure that ODF achieves its portion of budget savings, employees will take unpaid leave time on a floating basis during other days.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Update on fires near Maupin

Source: Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center

Lower Deschutes Complex-Prineville Bureau of Land Management


The Fall Canyon Fire is approximately 3,200 acres and 40% contained; approximately 60 firefighters and support personnel are assigned, including five engines. Due to limited accessibility, jet boats were utilized to ferry the Silver City and Lassen Hotshot crews to the southern flank of the fire Thursday.

The Devil’s Half Acre Fire is approximately 600 acres in size and 25% contained. Six additional crews arrived to assist with the fire Thursday, including the Zuni, Arrowhead, Fulton, Little Tujunga, Kern Valley and Sierra Interagency Hotshots. Other resources assigned include eight engines, a 20-person hand crew and multiple air resources.

Deschutes River Segment & Recreation Site Closure

The section of the Deschutes River from City Park in Maupin to Sandy Beach take out is closed to recreational use until further notice due to fire suppression activity. Use of all recreation sites, including overnight and day us in this section of the river is not permitted, including the Oasis, Blue Hole, Oak Springs and White River campgrounds. All use of the river including floating, swimming and fishing is not permitted. The closure is in effect on a day to day basis until further notice. There are no road closures in effect at this time.

Maupin - Potential evacuations
Residents of Maupin are still on a Planning Level 1 notice (precautionary) for potential evacuations.

Incident Management Team takes command of fire Friday

The Incident Command Post (ICP) for the Central Oregon Incident Management Team is located at the Dufur School; the team will assume command of the fire at 6:00 a.m. Friday

ODF resources control small central Oregon fires

Two small fires located on private land protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry and located south of the Ochoco National Forest in the Brennan Palisades area of central Oregon on Thursday have been contained.

Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center / Media Desk

Thursday, August 19, 2010

Conflagration Act declared for Wasco County

News Release - Oregon State Fire Marshals Office

Governor Theodore Kulongoski has declared the D. Harris fire 8 miles west of Maupin as a conflagration. The declaration cleared the way for the state fire marshal to mobilize firefighters and equipment to assist local resources battling the fire. The request to invoke the Oregon Conflagration Act was made by Wasco County Assistant Fire Defense Board Chief Jay Wood.


The fire started around 2 p.m. August 19. Dry fuel conditions of grass and juniper, along with significant winds have caused the fire to move rapidly with extreme fire behavior. The fire is threatening the Wasco County town of Maupin.

The Office of State Marshal's Red Incident Management Team and one structural task force are en-route. A second structural task force is scheduled to deploy the morning of August 20th.

Oregon's conflagration act may be invoked only by the Governor and allows the State Fire Marshal to dispatch structural firefighters and equipment to help local resources provide structural protection.

More information on Conflagration is available here: http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/Conflagration_Information_2007.shtml#Conflagration_FAQs

More Emergency Mobilization information is available here: http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/Oregon_Mob_Plan.shtml

Additional resources on surviving wildfires may be accessed at:

• Wildfire…Evacuation Readiness http://egov.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/docs/Comm_Ed/WUI/wildfire_evac.doc

• After the Wildfire… http://egov.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/docs/Comm_Ed/WUI/After_a_wildfire.doc

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Devil's Half Acre fire moves to federal team command; closures now in effect

Source: Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center

Due to fire activity associated with the Devil’s Half Acre fire, the White River Falls State Park and the Oak Springs Fish Hatchery, located on the west side of the lower Deschutes River, have been evacuated. Heavy helicopters continue to dip water out of the Deschutes River for fire suppression purposes. Developed recreation sites located on the east side of the river remain open at this time, as is Deschutes River.


The Central Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team, led by Incident Commander Mark Rapp has been ordered and was scheduled to take command of the fire incident at 6:00 p.m. Thursday. Command has been established at the Dufur School.

A recommendation was made to the Wasco County Sheriff’s Office to prepare affected residents for a potential evacuation. At this stage, residents should consider gathering up any valuable papers and non-replaceable items, medications, and an overnight bag with personal effects as a preparatory action. The evacuation preparations are directed at residents of Maupin, and developed recreation sites on the east side of the Deschutes River from White River south to Maupin, including Sandy Beach, Oak Springs, Lower Blue Hole, Blue Hole Grey Eagle, Oasis and Maupin and the BLM Maupin Visitor Center.

Note to pilots and news media - a Temporary Flight Restriction is in effect at 5,000 feet above sea level in a five-mile radius around the incident.

The Bureau of Land Management has closed several recreation areas affected by the fire. The order listing specific sites is found at: http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/centraloregon/fire/documents/20100819-blmclosureofpublicwaterwayandcampgrounds.pdf

Gusty winds, high temps raise fire potential around Umatilla County

The National Weather Service in Pendleton has issued a Red Flag Warning in effect until 8:00pm Thursday for fire zone OR-Z631, which generally includes portions of NE Oregon in Umatilla County including the Pendleton and Milton-Freewater area. Temperatures well into the 90’s with relative humidity as low as 15 percent will meet winds gusting to 35 miles per hour in places, increasing the fire potential for the region.

A Red Flag Warning is issued when weather forecasters detect conditions which create extreme potential for fire activity for a limited timeframe is either underway or imminent.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Devil's Half Acre fire - Precautionary Evacuation

Source: Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center

Due to fire activity associated with the Devil’s Half Acre fire, a PRECAUTIONARY evacuation is in effect on the west side of the lower Deschutes River corridor from White River to Maupin. This includes White River Falls State Park and the Oak Springs Fish Hatchery.

River recreationists are advised to proceed with caution in this area, as heavy helicopters are dipping water out of the Deschutes River for fire suppression purposes. Developed recreation sites located on the east side of the river remain open at this time, as is the river itself. Gusting winds to 30 mph are predicted in the area later this morning and this afternoon.

COIDC Media Desk -- 541/416-6811

Thirty Fires detected in SW Oregon

Medford, OR- August, 2010- A total of 30 fires have been found on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands after the lightning bust earlier this week. All of the fires, except for the 11 acre Anderson Creek Fire, have been less than 1.5 acre in size.

Eighteen of the lightning fires are less than .10 acre, and but two are 100% mopped and lined. The remaining two fires are in the mop-up stage and are expected to be completed by this afternoon.

Greg Alexander, ODF SWO assistant district forester, said, “The working relationships we have with our interagency partners, county officials and landowners has played a large role in our fire suppression.” The U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, Jackson and Josephine counties and landowners have helped keep wildfire damage to a minimum.

Reconnaissance flights will be made Thursday to detect new fires and all lookouts are staffed.
For wildfire prevention information visit www.rvfpc.com or visit our blog site at http://swofire.blogspot.com.

To report a fire, call 9-1-1.

Ashley Du Brey - Oregon Department of Forestry, SW Oregon District - Medford

Morning status report for ODF

No new fires 10 acres in size or larger were reported to ODF's Salem Coordination Center over the past night.

Kevin Weeks - Oregon Department of Forestry

Thursday morning status of central Oregon fires

Source: Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center

The Devil’s Half Acre Fire is burning on Prineville Bureau of Land Management protected land, approximately five miles north of Maupin and west of Oak Springs. Initial estimates of fire size is approximately 300 acres; heavy smoke has been limiting visibility and has been reported to be impacting the town of Fossil, approximately 40 miles to the southeast. Yesterday afternoon and evening, firefighters were challenged by erratic winds primarily out of the northwest that pushed the fire in all directions; the fire crossed the White River to the north and burned down to the west side of the Deschutes River. Due to the active fire activity, the Oak Springs Fish Hatchery is currently closed to the public.

Ground resources on scene include eight engines and a 20-person contract crew arriving this morning. Two heavy helicopters and two air tankers have been ordered to assist the ground crews this morning. A number of developed campgrounds along the river corridor are potentially threatened by the blaze, including White River Campground, White River State Park, and Surf City.

The Fall Canyon Fire is burning on steep slopes on Prineville Bureau of Land Management administered lands along the west side of the Lower Deschutes River, 12 miles north of Grass Valley. The fire, reported at 7:00 p.m. on August 17, has grown to 1000 acres and is burning in steep, rugged terrain and heavy grassy fuels. Quick responding fire crews managed to protect structures in the area, including several old homesteads. The river remains open, and no structures are in imminent danger. One medium and one light helicopter is assigned with a reconnaissance flight planned this morning. Sixty firefighters (including the Silver City Hotshots and the Lassen Hotshots) and support personnel are assigned.

Central Oregon fire roundup

Source: Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center

Central Oregon firefighters coordinated through the Central Oregon Dispatch Center were busy Wednesday with fires ignited by lightning activity that passed through the area Tuesday. Most of the fires remained small due to quick response by initial attack crews. Much of the storm activity was focused along the Cascade Mountains, with some cells drifting to the east.


One of two larger fires, the Devil’s Half Acre Fire, is burning on Prineville Bureau of Land Management protected land approximately one mile west of the Deschutes River, approximately five miles north of Maupin and west of Oak Springs. Initial estimates of fire size are 300 acres; heavy smoke is currently limiting visibility. As of 5:00 p.m., three single engine air tankers and three heavy air tankers are actively dropping retardant on the blaze.

Ground resources on scene include three engines with five additional engines ordered to arrive Wednesday night. A 20-person hand crew is ordered to arrive Thursday morning. Winds 15-20 mph are creating erratic conditions and pushing the fire to the south towards Maupin. A number of developed campgrounds along the river corridor are potentially threatened by the blaze, including White River Campground, White River State Park, Surf City and the Oak Springs Fish Hatchery.

The Fall Canyon Fire is burning on steep slopes on Prineville Bureau of Land Management administered lands along the west side of the Lower Deschutes River, 12 miles north of Grass Valley. The fire, reported at 7:00 p.m. Tuesday evening, has grown to 1000 acres and is burning in steep, rugged terrain and heavy grassy fuels. The river remains open, and no structures are in imminent danger. Three single engine air tankers and sixty firefighters (including the Silver City Hotshots and the Lassen Hotshots) and support personnel responded.

A one-tenth acre fire on the Deschutes National Forest in the Skyliner area west of Bend and north of Meissner Snopark was reported by Lava Butte Lookout around 4:30 p.m. Wednesday. Initial attack crews responded and contained the fire; no additional resources are needed.

On the Ochoco National Forest, initial attack crews are responding to small five fires; four of the fires are located west of Pisgah Lookout and a fifth fire is located south of Big Summit Prairie east of Horse Prairie. All of these fires are less than ¼ acre in size and quick containment is expected.

Wednesday, August 18, 2010

Big Burn of 1910 changed course of Oregon forestry

Observances this weekend in Idaho will mark the centennial of the 1910 Big Burn, a devastating fire that consumed 5,000 square miles of forest across Washington, Idaho and Montana, killing 78 fire fighters. Though the Big Burn occurred a century ago, the impacts of the fires remain felt today in wild land fire management and forest policy.

Read more about how the Big Burn shaped Oregon’s forests here: http://egov.oregon.gov/ODF/newsroom/newsreleases/2010/NR1041.shtml

Additional information about the 1910 Big Burn is available on the U.S. Forest Service Region One website, http://www.fs.fed.us/r1/1910-centennial/index.html

Nelson fire shows complexity of many ownership types

A fire burning 12 miles southwest of Maupin in Wasco County is currently being managed, in different areas, by fire resources from the Oregon Department of Forestry, Bureau of Indian Affairs fire protection and independent private landowners.


The Nelson fire, also referred to as the White Lightning fire, is a fast-moving blaze which preliminary estimates place at 850-900 acres on Wednesday afternoon. Lightning was determined to be the cause of the fire. ODF’s Central Oregon District responded with three engines, two contractor engines, bulldozer support from both ODF and landowners, and aerial support from three air tankers and one helicopter.

The fire occurred in an area with three distinct landowner types: the majority of the fire is occurring on private land outside of an ODF-affiliated protection district while ODF crews are working to keep the fire from moving onto ODF-protected land. On another boundary of the fire, BIA crews are seeking to keep the fire from moving onto Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs-owned lands.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Nelson Fire in central Oregon grows to 850 acres

The Nelson Fire reported Aug. 18 about 12 miles southwest of Maupin in the Central Oregon District has grown to approximately 850 acres. Oregon Dept. of Forestry is mobilizing additional firefighting resources for extended attack on the fast-moving fire. It was caused by lightning.

Ten small fires located Tuesday in SW Oregon

Yesterday 800 lightning strikes were recorded that resulted in 10 fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands. Engines, helicopters, a dozer and hand crew responded to the lightning activity.

A little over 13 acres were burned due to the lightning bust; however, 11.3 of those acres were from the Anderson Creek Fire, six miles southwest of Talent. The fire is now 100% mopped-up and lined around the perimeter. The remaining fires were all less than .50 acre in size.

Today, reconnaissance flights will be made to detect new fires and all lookouts are staffed. To report a fire, call 9-1-1.

To get fire updates visit our Twitter page at, www.twitter.com/swofire or our blog site at http://swofire.blogspot.com.

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Ashley Du Brey
Oregon Department of Forestry - SW Oregon District

Graveyard Butte Fire in central Oregon contained

Firefighters contained the 50-acre Graveyard Butte Fire Tuesday evening 12 miles west of Maupin in the Central Oregon District. Oregon Dept. of Forestry and rural fire department firefighters teamed to fight the lightning-caused blaze. The fire has been mopped up and is currently in patrol status.

Lightning starts small fires in Douglas County

Lightning activity from Tuesday evening’s thunderstorm produced about 50 lightning strikes and one confirmed fire on Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) protected lands. A DFPA engine crew responded to and extinguished a single tree fire in the White Rock area northeast of Myrtle Creek. DFPA also assisted the Umpqua National Forest with three small fires on the Tiller Ranger District.

DFPA will take to the air with a fixed wing aircraft Wednesday morning to scour the county for possible sleeper fires from the storm. DFPA is also working with Douglas County landowners who are assisting in the patrol of forestlands.

The thunderstorm hit Douglas County around 5:00 p.m. as it made it’s way from southern Oregon and traveled north and east over the Cascades. Over 3,600 lightning strikes were recorded throughout the state and were accompanied by varying amounts of rainfall ranging from zero to 1.76 inches.

While on high alert during Monday evening’s storm, firefighters responded to a report of a fire that turned out to be an illegal burn pile near Elkhead Road and Romey Howard Road. The individual was cited for burning without a permit. All back yard burning is currently prohibited on DFPA protected lands.

Tom Fields - Douglas Forest Protective Association
(541) 672-6507 ext. 136

Morning update - Anderson Creek fire under control

No new fires 10 acres in size or larger were reported to ODF's Salem Coordination Center overnight.

The 11-acre Anderson Creek Fire was reported Tuesday afternoon burning six miles southwest of the community of Talent in Jackson County. ODF resources fighting the fire included two helicopters, five fire engines, one hand crew, one bulldozer and one water tender. The fire is 100 percent lined with crews in mop-up mode on Wednesday morning.

Kevin Weeks - Oregon Department of Forestry

Elevated fire danger prompts updated burn ban in Wallowa County

The Oregon Department of Forestry, in conjunction with Fire Departments from Wallowa, Joseph, Enterprise and Wallowa Lake, is restricting all open burning on lands within their protection area in Wallowa County. Any burn permits which were previously issued have been suspended. Recent hot dry weather has elevated the fire danger throughout the county. Mike Shaw, Wallowa Unit Forester, says “The burn ban is intended to limit human caused fires and allow fire fighters to focus on fires caused by mother-nature.” Dry lightning storms are predicted to pass through Wallowa County this week.

The Northeast Oregon District of the Oregon Department of Forestry remains in a Regulated-Use Closure.
The Regulated Use Closure affects private, state, county, municipal, and tribal lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry in seven counties: Union, Baker, Wallowa, Umatilla, and small portions of Malheur, Morrow and Grant. The Regulated Use Closure is intended to protect natural resources and public health and safety.

Visit our website at http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/FIELD/NEO/aboutneo.shtml or contact a local Oregon Department of Forestry office for more complete information on ODF Restrictions:

La Grande Unit (541) 963-3168

Baker City Sub-Unit (541) 523-5831

Wallowa Unit (541) 886-2881

Pendleton Unit (541) 276-3491

To report a fire, contact:

Blue Mountain Interagency Dispatch Center (541) 963-7171 or 9-1-1

Public-Use Restrictions for the Umatilla and Wallowa Whitman National Forests are in effect. Information on Public-Use Restrictions on the Oregon Department of Forestry, Umatilla National Forest and Wallowa Whitman National Forest can be found at http://bmidc.org/index.shtml under Current Information: Fire Restrictions.

Christie Shaw - Oregon Department of Forestry

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

Anderson Creek Fire burning in SW Oregon

The 15-acre Anderson Creek Fire was reported Tuesday afternoon burning six miles southwest of the community of Talent in Jackson County. Rugged terrain and hot, dry conditions are challenging firefighters. Oregon Dept. of Forestry resources fighting the fire include two helicopters, five fire engines, one hand crew, one bulldozer and one water tender. The blaze is currently uncontained.

Daily fire update - Aug. 17, 2010

No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported on the 15.8 million acres of forestland protect by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry over the past 24 hours.

Monday, August 16, 2010

Garrish Valley Fire mopped up, in patrol status Aug. 16

Mop-up of the 74-acre Garrish Valley Fire reported Saturday evening in Oregon Dept. of Forestry's (ODF) Forest Grove District in northwestern Oregon was completed Sunday evening. Firefighters are patrolling the  site today. At the peak of the suppression action, resources on the fire included: seven ODF fire engines, 10 rural fire district engines, five South Fork Forest Camp inmate hand crews and four water tenders.

Sunday, August 15, 2010

74-acre Garrish Valley Fire now in mop-up

The 74-acre Garrish Valley Fire reported Saturday evening in Oregon Dept. of Forestry's (ODF) Forest Grove District in northwestern Oregon has been contained. Firefighters are currently mopping up the blaze. At the peak of the firefighting action, resources working the fire included seven ODF fire engines, 10 rural fire district engines, five South Fork Forest Camp inmate hand crews and four water tenders.

Friday, August 13, 2010

Daily fire update - Aug. 13, 2010

No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported on Oregon Dept. of Forestry-protected lands during the past 24 hours.

Thursday, August 12, 2010

Daily fire update, Aug. 11, 2010

The 14-acre Devils Den Spring Fire was reported Wednesday afternoon near the town of Spray in Wheeler County. Oregon Dept. of Forestry performed initial attack on the blaze with two fire engines and one hand crew. Today firefighters are mopping up the lightning-caused fire.

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

Daily fire update, Aug. 11, 2010

No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported on Oregon Dept. of Forestry-protected lands during the past 24 hours.

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Daily fire update, Aug. 10, 2010

No new fires 10 acres or larger in size were reported on Oregon Dept. of Forestry-protected lands during the past 24 hours.

Monday, August 9, 2010

Daily Fire Update - Monday, August 9, 2010

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update for Monday, August 9, 2010.

Current Fires


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:
Wallowa Unit, Northeast Oregon District - Incident 650 was reported at 6 p.m. on Friday, August 6, near the East Fork of Tamarack Creek in Wallowa County. The fire burned approximately 11.5 acres and is now fully contained and controlled, with all resources being demobilized today.

FIRES ON SHARED JURISDICTIONS:
The Rooster Rock Fire, burning six miles south of Sisters, reported Monday, August 2, is at approximately 6,134 acres – 1,355 acres on U.S. Forest Service land and 4,779 acres on private lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. The fire is 85 percent contained, with full containment expected to occur on Tuesday, August 10, at 6 a.m. At that same time, the Central Oregon Incident Management Team will transition responsibility for the fire to a local Incident Management Team. The cause of the fire remains under investigation.

Fire activity is minimal while firefighters continue to strengthen perimeter lines, mop up ‘hot spots’, and start rehab. Mop-up standards are 300 feet from the perimeter. As mop-up standards are met, crews will be pulling hoses and equipment. Rehab includes measures taken to bring dozer and hand lines back to a near natural condition mitigating potential increases in runoff and erosion that can occur immediately after a wildlfire.

The Central Oregon Incident Management Team has issued their last update on this fire. Starting tomorrow, Tuesday, August 10, 2010, information on the fire will be coordinated through the Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center (Media Desk) at 541-416-6811 or visit http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/centraloregon/fire .

CLOSURES: The existing Rooster Rock Fire Special Area Closure notice which included the Peterson Ridge Trail system and Forest Road 16 has been revised, effective August 7, 2010. Motorists and recreationists are cautioned to lookout for the presence of fire personnel and vehicles continuing to work along the road. Limitations on all other areas stated in the revised closure remain in effect. Visit the fire information website on Inciweb.

Complete information on this fire is available on the Inciweb site at http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2056 .

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Jeri Chase
Oregon Department of Forestry
PH: 503-945-7201
Fire Duty Officer Pager #: 503-370-0403

Sunday, August 8, 2010

Rooster Rock Fire - Public Information Map - Effective August 8, 2010

The latest map of the Rooster Rock Fire, showing the revised closure and approximate fire acreage, has been posted to the fire's Inciweb site at http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2056/ .

The direct link to open the enlarged version is:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/ftp/InciWeb/ORDEF/2010-08-03-15:34-rooster-rock/picts/pict-20100808-172244-1.jpeg

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Jeri Chase
Oregon Department of Forestry
PH: 503-945-7201
Fire Duty Officer #: 503-370-0403

Rooster Rock Fire - Announcement: Tending Your Campfire: Revisiting Smokey's Message

The following announcement/news release is from the Central Oregon Incident Management Team on the Rooster Rock Fire, August 8, 2010:

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Tending Your Campfire: Revisiting Smokey's Message

Incident: Rooster Rock Wildfire
Released: August 8, 2010; 5 p.m.
Abandoned and unattended campfires have become the predominant cause of recent fire starts in Central Oregon. Regional fire researchers (1) estimate that 2/3 of current statistical fires are human caused, compared to 1/3 of fires caused by lightening.

Nationally, over fifty percent of all large fires are human caused (2) Besides campfires, other types of human caused fires requiring fire personnel intervention include: fires caused by smokers, debris burning, equipment use, and arson. The percentage of children (minor) caused fires is extremely low. Adults predominantly cause fires.

SMALL FIRES
Fire is an element that has provided comfort and utility for humankind since prehistoric eras. In modern times, we no longer need to ward off saber-toothed tigers, but still retain an innate attraction to fire. Whether socializing around a campfire, dutch oven cooking, or enjoying the comfort of a warming fire at hunting camp, fire retains its mythological status. With the increased recreation in public lands and camping, the popularity of campfires creates a need to moderate our use of fire in both dispersed and developed campsites. Small fires are best for cooking, warming, and are easier to control. They create less impact. While bonfires are exciting, they pose more danger than warranted. Until they are cold out they are a source of ignition for nearby surface vegetation and surrounding tree limbs as they throw off firebrands and the flame lengths may be high. Additionally, attempting to douse a bonfire composed of large logs, will require enormous effort and water.

WHEN IS A FIRE SAFE TO LEAVE UNATTENDED
A fire is never safe to leave unattended. It's really that simple. A shift in wind direction or speed can easily tease up flame in embers and send even small fire brands to nearby vegetation. This could take five minutes, it could take five hours. Is it worth the risk In June, 2010, the Schultz Fire, north of Flagstaff, AZ, was started by an abandoned campfire, eventually burning 15,075 acres, much of which was prime ponderosa and aspen forest, as well as a critical watershed. The cost of the Schultz Fire was estimated at $8,613,389 (4). The eight million doesn't include the damages for the floods that occurred post-fire when monsoon rains ran off the hydrophobic soils caused by the Schultz Fire. How do you quantify that Public awareness of the necessity to leave all campfires cold is critical with the increased use of our public lands.

WHAT IS "COLD"?
Fortunately every camper has the one tool needed to check the heat of a campfire: hands. If a fire is too hot to touch, it's too hot to leave; simple enough. Burying a campfire is not effective, the heat can stay dormant in unburned bark and roots, 'skunking' until it can break into flame. The potential for this to happen is high, especially in high desert areas like Central Oregon, where the climate is drier than the western side of the Cascades.

The safest method of putting a fire out 'cold' is to pour water over the pit and mix the embers with a shovel, making a kind of campfire soup. This may take a surprising amount of water and should be planned when preparing for a trip. The general rule is the larger the circumference of the wood, the more water it will take to remove the heat. The simplest solution is to only burn small fuels that will be consumed down to ash before leaving. This will lessen the water needed to leave a campfire cold and increase the confidence of returning home with no future regrets.

PENALTY FOR ABANDONMENT
Conclusive agreement by frontline land management personnel indicates 'whether you're gone five minutes or five hours, if you're not in sight of the fire, it's abandoned'. Adults are legally responsible for suppression costs of their fires and the fires of their minor children, plus any damages incurred by negligence. Given the potential property loss, and endangerment of life posed by forest fires, the Federal Code of Regulations (CFR) Title 36. 261.5 is specific and prohibits: "(a) Carelessly or negligently throwing or placing any ignited substance or other substance that may cause a fire. (b) Firing any tracer bullet of incendiary ammunition. (c) Causing timber, trees, slash, brush or grass to burn except as authorized by permit. (d) Leaving a fire without completely extinguishing it. (e) Allowing a fire to escape from control. (f) Building, attending, maintaining, or using a campfire without removing all flammable material from around the campfire adequate to prevent its escape."

In some cases, state violations may be added to a federal violation. The fine for negligent use of fire varies by district and jurisdiction, from $125 to $500, and may include imprisonment, depending on the seriousness of the incident. Beyond legal ramifications, there are some long term effects of causing a wildfire which are difficult to put a number on: injury or death to people caught in the fire or firefighting personnel suppressing that fire, long term damage to watersheds, old growth, or wild and scenic resources that will not be restored except in many generations ahead.

REPORT AND PUT OUT ABANDONED CAMPFIRES
Given the current statistics, it is important that all recreationists be willing to mitigate the negligence of others for the common good. In the event you find an abandoned campfire, put it out if you have sufficient water. If you can't put it out yourself, lacking water or tools, call the local 911 non-emergency line and report the location and time of your observation. Write down any details that may assist in locating the owners of the abandoned fire. In Central Oregon, you can also directly notify Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch in Prineville at 541.416.6800.

Ultimately, the only way to know a fire is safe to leave is if you can place your hand on any part of the fire. If the fire is too hot to touch, it's too hot to leave.

Additional Resource
How to put out a fire: http://azstateparks.com/find/f_act_fire.html

References
(1) Lisa Clark, Fire Mitigation Specialist for the Central Oregon Fire Management Service, a combined USFS and BLM agency.
(2) NWCG website
(3) Code of Federal Regulations36 C.F.R. � 261.5 Fire, Title 36 - Parks, Forests, and Public Property [42 FR 2957, Jan. 14, 1977, as amended at 46 FR 33520, June 30, 1981]
(4) Schultz Fire Incident Management Team 
(5) Inciweb.org: Schultz Fire, AZ


Written by Alexis West, Rooster Rock Fire, Public Information Officer 2

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Jeri Chase
Oregon Department of Forestry
PH: 503-945-7201
Fire Duty Officer Pager #: 503-370-0403
 

Comments and questions

The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

Cool, wet weather in the winter of 2016-17 ended Oregon's long drought and left a thick snowpack at higher elevations which will take some time to melt. However, even in non-drought years Oregon's warm, dry summers create conditions that allow for fire to start and spread. In an average summer firefighters still see almost a thousand fires on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.



What we do

Protection jurisdiction

The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. In total there are about 30.4 million acres of forest in Oregon.



Fire suppression policy

The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. While suppressing large fires can cost millions of dollars, economic and environmental damage from wildfires can be many times greater.





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About Me

My photo
Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers in Salem, Ore., maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.