Lightning is largely absent from Oregon this week. However, warm, dry weather will greet the hundreds of thousands of visitors arriving to see the eclipse of the sun on Aug. 21. Avoiding activities that can spark a wildfire is key to making the eclipse a safe and pleasant experience for all. One measure adopted to reduce the risk of wildfire is a temporary ban, now in effect, on all campfires in state parks





Thursday, August 26, 2010

Daily Fire Update - Thursday, August 26, 2010

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update for Thursday, August 26, 2010.


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:
Western Lane District, ODF: The Whittaker Creek Fire, was reported at 3:30 a.m. Wednesday, August 25, burning in steep terrain on ODF-protected lands near Whittaker Creek in Lane County. Currently estimated at 15 acres, the fire has been 100 percent lined, is contained and firefighters are continuing with mop-up. The cause of this fire remains under investigation.

SPECIAL NOTICE:
OHV trails in the Tillamook State Forest RE-OPEN. Effective Thursday, August 26, 2010, the off-highway vehicle trails in the Tillamook State Forest are RE-OPEN. This includes off-highway vehicle trails in the Browns Camp, Jordan Creek, Diamond Mill, and Trask off-highway vehicle areas, and the BLM Upper Nestucca Riding Area. Fire Season Regulated Use Precautions are still in effect.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON:
There are a number of fires burning in the Cascades and several smoke columns have become and will continue to be visible.

The 950-acre Scott Mountain Fire is burning approximately two miles northeast of Scott Mountain, 15 miles west of Sisters, and 14 miles northeast of McKenzie Bridge in the Mt. Washington Wilderness Area. The interagency Pacific Northwest Incident Management Team 3 has assumed command of this fire. Smoke from the Scott Mountain Fire has impacted and will continue to impact central Oregon and was being reported yesterday as far away as the lower Santiam Canyon area just east of Salem. More information on closures and fire status is available on Inciweb at http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2082/ .

The White Lightning Fire, burning on Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs lands 15 miles north of the city of Warm Springs, is currently estimated at 29,073 acres and 30 percent contained. Portions of the Deschutes River have been re-opened to recreationists – stretches of the river from Warm Springs Boat Launch to Trout Creek Campground (River Mile 88) and downstream from Harphan Flat (River Mile 56) are now open. The remaining 32-mile closure remains in effect. The interagency Northwest Oregon Incident Management Team is assigned to this fire and more information, including Deschutes River closures, is available on InciWeb at http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2075/ .

The Oak Flat Fire, burning on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest in Josephine County two miles northeast of the junction of the Illinois River and Briggs Creek, about 20 miles southwest of Grants Pass, is currently estimated at 4,760 acres and is 75 percent contained. The interagency Oregon-California (ORCA) Incident Management Team assigned to this fire was planning to turn it back over to the forest on Saturday morning, although per a special update issued at 7 p.m. last night (August 25), high temperatures and low humidity created conditions for extreme fire behavior Wednesday afternoon, and the fire crossed over the containment line on the north side and was being wind-driven to the north. The estimated containment date has now been pushed back two more days to August 30, and additional resources (crews and helicopters) were ordered. The weather is forecast to cool some beginning today, which should moderate fire behavior, allowing firefighters to re-establish control lines. More information on closures and fire status, is available on Inciweb at http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2066/ .

Mt. Hood National Forest. Due to fire activity from the View Lake Fire, currently estimated at approximately 776 acres, the Olallie Lake Scenic Area, access to Breitenbush Lake, and portions of the Bull of the Woods Wilderness Area are closed. More information is available at http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/mthood/ .
 
*************************************
Jeri Chase
Oregon Department of Forestry
PH: 503-945-7201
Fire Duty Officer Pager #: 503-370-0403

No comments:

Post a Comment

Have a question/comment about this season's wildfire activity on the 16 million acres of private and public forestlands that the Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects from wildfire? Let us know. Please keep your remarks civil and free of profanity.

Comments and questions

The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

Cool, wet weather in the winter of 2016-17 ended Oregon's long drought and left a thick snowpack at higher elevations which will take some time to melt. However, even in non-drought years Oregon's warm, dry summers create conditions that allow for fire to start and spread. In an average summer firefighters still see almost a thousand fires on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.



What we do

Protection jurisdiction

The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state- and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. There are about 30.4 million total acres of forest in Oregon.



Fire suppression policy

The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. While suppressing large fires can cost millions of dollars, economic and environmental damage from wildfires can be many times greater.




Followers

About Me

My photo
Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers in Salem, Ore., maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.