Current situation

Fire season on ODF-protected land has officially ended in all of Oregon as cooler temperatures and moister conditions settle over much of the state. With the end of wildfire season in Oregon, firefighting resources are now more available. As a result, several public and private engines and crews have been dispatched to California to assist with the devastating wildfires there.































Friday, June 24, 2011

ODF Weekly Fire Update - Week Ending June 24, 2011

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) fire update for the week ending Friday June 24, 2011. During the early part of the wildfire season, updates will be sent only when significant fires occur. A weekly summary will be sent on Fridays.


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:
There were no fires 10 acres or larger in size reported on ODF-protected lands during the past week.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS:
No reports of fire on other lands in Oregon.

Forestlands in Jackson and Josephine counties that are protected by the department’s Southwest Oregon District will enter fire season on Friday July 1st.

When nearly everywhere you look is green, it’s easy to become complacent about fire danger in the forest. But this Fourth of July there is still much that can burn, even after the wet, cool spring. The Oregon Department of Forestry urges Oregonians to be mindful of fire safety over the Fourth and on into fire season.

OUT-OF-STATE DISPATCHES:
With cool, damp weather prevailing across the Pacific Northwest this spring, wildfire activity has been delayed. This enabled ODF to provide assistance to other states that are experiencing large fires; however, the bulk of ODF personnel are returning home, their fire assignments completed and ready for fire season back in Oregon.

As of Wednesday, June 22nd, ODF currently has 54 overhead (personnel specially trained in wildfire management) deployed to Arizona, Alaska, New Mexico, and California. Their skill sets span the entire range of firefighting jobs, from incident commander to helicopter crew member, fire engine boss to logistics chief. Seventy-seven ODF overhead specialists have returned from fire assignments, bringing the total ODF deployments out of state this season to 131.

These assignments are helping Oregon fire personnel gain experience and keep current their national firefighting qualifications. ODF incurs no financial drain by assisting other states, since the jurisdictional agency hosting fire suppression operations pays the bills. As Oregon enters summer weather conditions, ODF’s fire managers will pull back their personnel from the out-of-state assignments to be ready for wildfires here at home.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION:
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/, or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE:
The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. However, because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies commonly work closely together.

This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected land, and on the department's role as a partner in fighting major fires that start on land protected by other agencies.

FIRE INFORMATION

News media may contact the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office for fire information, (503) 945-7200, weekdays during business hours. After business hours and on weekends, media may obtain fire information by calling the duty pager (503) 370-0403. The duty officer will return media pages promptly.

ODF also maintains a blog that includes breaking news on wildfires, along with current fire statistics. Visit the blog at: http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/

Carelessness can destroy Oregon's beauty. Learn what you can do to prevent wildfires. Visit the Keep Oregon Green Association on the web at www.keeporegongreen.org/.

********************************
Jeri Chase, Agency Web Coordinator/
Public Affairs Representative
PH: 503-945-7201
FAX: 503-945-7212
e-mail: jchase@odf.state.or.us
http://www.oregon.gov/ODF

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Have a question/comment about this season's wildfire activity on the 16 million acres of private and public forestlands that the Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects from wildfire? Let us know. Please keep your remarks civil and free of profanity.

Comments and questions

The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

Cool, wet weather in the winter of 2016-17 ended Oregon's long drought and left a thick snowpack at higher elevations which will take some time to melt. However, even in non-drought years Oregon's warm, dry summers create conditions that allow for fire to start and spread. In an average summer firefighters still see almost a thousand fires on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.



What we do

Protection jurisdiction

The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. In total there are about 30.4 million acres of forest in Oregon.



Fire suppression policy

The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. While suppressing large fires can cost millions of dollars, economic and environmental damage from wildfires can be many times greater.





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About Me

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Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers in Salem, Ore., maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.