Current situation

Fire season on ODF-protected land has officially ended in all of Oregon as cooler temperatures and moister conditions settle over much of the state. This late in the fall, a key source of ignitions is fire escaping when piles of woody debris are burned. Care is required with that activity at any time of year.
































Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update for Wednesday, September 14, 2011

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Daily Fire Update for Wednesday, September 14, 2011.


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:
No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF-protected lands have been reported during the past 24 hours.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON:
Many of the following fires involve road or other resource-area closures that are in effect. Please check the information that is available before heading out to areas that these fires may be impacting.

In addition to the other fire information resources that are always available in Oregon during fire season, while the National Incident Management Organization is in Oregon assigned to the Shadow Lake Fire, Kris Erikson, federal Incident Information Officer, is also providing information about fires burning in Oregon on Twitter at http://twitter.com/#!/orfireinfo/, on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/oregonfireinfo , and on a blog at http://orfireinfo.net/. These are excellent resources for both the public and the media to monitor and/or sign up to receive updates.

North-Central Oregon

The 108,154-acre High Cascades Fire Complex, reported August 24 burning along the Deschutes River, is now 95 percent contained. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is leading the suppression effort on the lightning-caused fire. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2546.

The 6,249-acre Dollar Lake Fire, reported August 27 burning 16 miles south of Hood River, is now 45 percent contained. The U.S. Forest Service is leading the suppression effort on the lightning-caused fire. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2563.

The 2,063-acre Mother Lode Fire, reported August 26, burning 10 miles northwest of Detroit in the Mount Hood National Forest is 5 percent contained. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2636.

The 9,987-acre Shadow Lake Fire, reported August 28 burning 15 miles west of Sisters, is 35 percent contained. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy. Favorable weather conditions are contributing to firefighter efforts. The McKenzie River National Scenic Trail and Clear Lake Resort both plan to re-open by this week-end. While closures are still in effect in both the Deschutes and Willamette national forests due to this fire, potential opportunities to reduce those closure areas are being evaluated. Check forest websites or contact the Sisters Ranger District (541-549-7700) or the McKenzie Ranger District (541-822-3381) for a list of roads or hiking trails open for use. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2550.

The 88-acre Substitute Fire, reported August 24, is burning in the Willamette National Forest, 14 miles southeast of McKenzie Bridge in the Three Sisters Wilderness on the east slopes of Substitute Point. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2633.

Northeast Oregon
The 8,350-acre Cactus Mountain Fire, reported September 7 burning in grassland 17 miles north/northeast of Imnaha in Wallowa County, is 90 percent contained and will be turned over to a local fire team. Unless the situation changes, this will be the last report in these ODF updates about this fire. Additional incident information is available through InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2661.

The 119-acre Chicken Hill Fire, reported September 5 burning 48 miles southwest of LaGrande, is now 85 percent contained and will be transitioning to a local team. The U.S. Forest Service is managing this fire. Additional incident information is available through InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2660.

The 353-acre Jim White Ridge Complex, reported August 3, is burning 10 miles east of Cove. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fires with a monitor/confine/contain strategy.
Southern Oregon

The 100-acre Lone Mountain Fire, reported September 9, burned in grass, brush, and timber about 4 miles southwest of O’Brien, in Josephine County. The fire is about 100 acres and 75 percent contained. Cause of the fire is under investigation. Unless the situation changes, this will be the last report in these ODF updates about this fire. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2655.

The 770-acre Umpqua Complex of fires, reported on September 8, burning 9 miles south of Toketee, near Diamond Lake and the North Umpqua Ranger Districts in the Umpqua National Forest, is 10 percent contained. An incident management team from southern California assumed command of the fire on September 11. Additional incident information is available through InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2652.

The 620-acre Red Cone Complex of fires is burning 10 miles northwest of the Crater Lake National Park headquarters. The fire, which began August 20, is being managed by the National Parks Service with a monitor/confine/contain strategy. Additional incident information is now available on InciWeb at: www.inciweb.org/incident/2648/.

The 467-acre Little Butte Fire, reported on September 5, burning on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest approximately 16 miles northeast of Medford, is 95 percent contained. ODF provided initial attack resources and the fire is being managed through a unified command of Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest and ODF.

Eastern Oregon

The 1,400-acre Buffalo Fire, reported September 8, is burning 23 miles southeast of Christmas Valley on BLM Lakeview District grasslands. The fire is 95 percent contained.

The 6100-acre Garden Fire, reported September 8, is burning 8 miles northeast of Fort Rock. This lightning-caused fire is burning in grasslands, brush and juniper within the BLM Lakeview District, and is 50 percent contained. An interagency incident management team is being assigned to this incident.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION:
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/ - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38. Note that the InciWeb system is experiencing a high volume of server traffic due to the number of wildland fires burning across the country and response times at times may be slowed.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE:
The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. However, because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies commonly work closely together.

This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected land, and on the department's role as a partner in fighting major fires that start on land protected by other agencies.

************************************
Jeri Chase, ODF Information Officer
Fire Duty Officer Pager #: 503-370-0403

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The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

Cool, wet weather in the winter of 2016-17 ended Oregon's long drought and left a thick snowpack at higher elevations which will take some time to melt. However, in the summer of 2017 a series of heatwaves and a prolonged stretch of dry weather created conditions that dried forest fuels, allowing fires to start and spread. The result was more than a thousand fires on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Ninety-five percent of these were put out at less than 10 acres.






What we do

Protection jurisdiction

The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. In total there are about 30.4 million acres of forest in Oregon.



Fire suppression policy

The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. While suppressing large fires can cost millions of dollars, economic and environmental damage from wildfires can be many times greater.





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Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers in Salem, Ore., maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.