2015 another severe fire season

A cool, wet winter and heavy snowpack delayed the start of fire season in much of western and northeastern Oregon. However, the onset of hotter, drier weather is quickly drying out forests and rangeland, making it easier for fires to start. More than half of ODF-protected lands are in districts that have declared the start of fire season this month. It's especially important as summer approaches to avoid or be extra careful with any potential source of fire in wooded areas. Fire season means the end of most outdoor activities that are high risk for starting a fire, such as debris burning, campfires outside of designated areas, and using tracer ammunition and exploding targets.







Friday, July 29, 2011

ODF Fire Update - Week Ending July 29, 2011

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) fire update for the week ending Friday, July 29, 2011.


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:
No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported this past week on the lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

Cool, damp weather has limited the number and size of wildfires so far this summer. But the seasonal weather pattern is taking hold, and fire danger is rising. The abundant growth of grasses and brush stimulated by the added rainfall will create a large potential fuel load in August and September as these fine fuels cure. Recreationists, forest operators, and residents of the wildland-urban interface all need to be especially aware of fire safety in the weeks and months ahead.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS:
No new fires reported.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION:
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/, or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE:
The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. However, because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies commonly work closely together.

This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected land, and on the department's role as a partner in fighting major fires that start on land protected by other agencies.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Fire update - July 26, 2011

No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported today on the lands protected by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry.

Monday, July 25, 2011

Fire update - July 25, 2011

No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported on Oregon Dept. of Forestry-protected lands over the weekend.

Friday, July 22, 2011

Fire summary - Week ending July 22, 2011

No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported this past week on the 16 million acres of forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

Cool, damp weather has limited the number and size of wildfires so far this summer. But the seasonal weather pattern is beginning to take hold, and fire danger is expected to rise. The abundant growth of grasses and brush stimulated by the added rainfall will create a large potential fuel load in August and September as these fine fuels cure. Recreationists, forest operators and residents of the wildland-urban interface all need to be especially aware of fire safety in the weeks and months ahead.

Thursday, July 14, 2011

ODF Fire Season Update

Just a few thoughts that Paul Bell, our Deputy State Forester, shared with all employees on Tuesday, July 12, 2011, on the 2011 Fire Season:

Safety Our Highest Priority

As all are aware, we have enjoyed a cool wet spring, which has helped a lot on the front end of the fire season. That said, this type of weather has also produced an over-abundance of fine fuels that with the right combination of summer and fall weather conditions could provide for significant fire activity given an ignition source. That does not mean that is what will happen, it only means that it can happen. Because of that, as always, we must maintain our high standards of safety, prevention and readiness, no exceptions!

Out-of-State Dispatches

As of the end of last week, the Oregon Department of Forestry has dispatched over 140 agency and Forest Protection Association personnel out of state on fire assignments. At this time almost all have returned to their home units. This has provided a wonderful opportunity to help folks with qualifications, training, experience, budget savings and the support of other states. Comments that the department have received back from some of the other states have been outstanding and a credit to the folks who have filled these assignments and in effect served as ambassadors of ODF and the State of Oregon. From my perspective this has been an excellent Department operation.

The out-of-state assignments have gotten the agency off to a great start this year and I look forward to a safe and productive fire season.  As we move forward, we need to continue to watch for each other and assure safety is paramount.


Paul Bell, Deputy State Forester
Chief, Fire Protection Division
Oregon Department of Forestry

***************
Posted by Jeri Chase
ODF Public Information Officer
PH: 503-945-7201
Fire Duty Officer Pager #503-370-0403

Tuesday, July 12, 2011

ODF North Cascade district enters fire season Wednesday

The Oregon Department of Forestry’s North Cascade District, covering Marion County, Clackamas County and the eastern forested area of Multnomah County, will enter fire season at 12:01 a.m. on Wednesday July 13th.

ODF-protected lands in the North Cascade Forest Protection District will also enter Regulated Use Closure on Wednesday as well. Fire restrictions apply to land within one-half mile of the Molalla River from Glen Avon Bridge upstream to the confluence of the Middle Fork, extending upstream 4 miles from confluence on the main stem, and the Middle Fork of the Molalla River on all land within an eighth of a mile of the Molalla River.

Complete information about the Regulated Use Closure is available on the ODF web site at:
http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/FIRE/Closures/RU06.pdf

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Monday, July 11, 2011

Burn ban in effect for Yamhill County, portions of Polk

The Yamhill County Fire Defense Board, in cooperation with the Oregon Department of Forestry, has enacted a Burn Ban within Yamhill County effective Monday, July 11th, 2011 at 1 a.m. Following that decision, all fire jurisdictions will ban outdoor burning within their jurisdiction, including areas in Polk County served by Amity, Dayton, Sheridan, and West Valley Fire Districts.


The Burn Ban covers all burning including, but not limited to, the following situations:

1. Individuals normally allowed to backyard burn

2. Individuals normally allowed to burn agricultural waste

3. Individuals with a Hardship Permit issued by DEQ

The Burn Ban does not include recreational burning (backyard fire pits and campfires in designated areas when approved by the Oregon Department of Forestry). Individuals intending to burn in this manner should use always exercise caution with fire sources.

Individuals found burning during the burn ban may be issued a citation and/or found liable for any property loss damage and suppression costs resulting from a burning incident. The burn ban will remain in effect until significant rains and cooler temperatures minimize the fire danger in the fall.

Sunday, July 10, 2011

Burn ban in Washington County applies to ODF-protected lands

Fire Season will begin throughout ODF-protected land in Washington County, starting at 1:00 am on July 11. Fire season is determined by the State Forester when vegetation becomes dry and fires become harder to control.


Fire season restrictions that go into effect in ODF Protection Areas within Washington County on July 11, are as follows:

* The use of fireworks will be prohibited.
* Debris burning will be prohibited.
* Burn permits will be required for any burning and the burn site must be inspected by ODF prior to ignition.

Warnings and citations will be issued by ODF should individuals be found burning without permits in ODF Protection Areas in Washington County. Individuals wishing to obtain a burn permit through ODF should call the ODF Forest Grove District office at 503-357-2191 or the ODF Forest Grove dispatch center at 503-359-7424.

A distinction should be noted regarding the burn ban; the declaration applies to ODF protected land, and not areas protected by a structural fire service or district (for example, Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue, Hillsboro Fire District, etc). The Fire Season declaration by the State Forester does move structural fire agencies to a heightened state of readiness for wildfires, and is the first step in moving towards a countywide Burn Ban in the near future. Once a countywide Burn Ban is declared, there will be no burning of any kind allowed in Washington County.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Containment expected Sunday on Warm Springs fire

Source: NW Coordination Center

The Upper Dry Creek fire burning on the Warm Springs reservation was mapped Saturday as covering 1,313 acres with containment at 90 percent. Full containment of the fire, reported Thursday afternoon, is expected on Sunday.

Friday, July 8, 2011

NW Oregon enters fire season Monday

The Oregon Department of Forestry’s (ODF) Northwest Oregon Fire Protection District will enter wildfire season on Monday, July 11. Entry into fire season imposes certain restrictions on work activities in the forest. Industrial operations are required to have firefighting equipment on site.


Wet, cool weather this spring delayed the onset of wildfire activity. But seasonal weather patterns have begun to take hold and forest vegetation is drying out rapidly. The added rainfall spurred heavy growth of grasses and brush, adding to the potential fuel bed, should a fire start.

The Northwest Oregon Fire Protection District includes the Astoria, Forest Grove and Tillamook ODF districts, covering Clatsop, Columbia, Tillamook counties and some portions of Washington and Yamhill counties.

For more information on the restrictions imposed by the fire season declaration, contact the nearest Oregon Department of Forestry office. Contact information for the Astoria, Forest Grove and Tillamook district offices can be found at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/offices.shtml.

On the 16 million acres of forestland protected by the Department of Forestry, the 10-year average for the period Jan. 1 - July 8 is 293 wildfires burning a total of 1,071 acres. In a typical year, about two-thirds of the fires are caused by people and the remainder by lightning. Of the human-caused fires, fewer than half are caused by forest landowners and operators. Across all Oregon forest protection jurisdictions, about 2,600 wildfires burn roughly 239,000 acres on average annually.

Through July 7, 2011, three lightning-caused fires have burned three acres on lands protected by ODF. During that period, 87 human-caused fires burned about 43 acres.

Rod Nichols
Oregon Department of Forestry

Update on Warm Springs fire

Source: NW Coordination Center, Portland

The Upper Dry Creek fire was reported after 1:00pm Thursday burning two miles north of Warm Springs in area under Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs protection. Official estimates on Friday morning place size of the fire at approximately 1,000 acres. Cause of fire was determined to be human caused in grass land. Fire is in mop-up status Friday.

Weekly Fire Update for ODF

No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF-protected lands -- with the exception of the 88-acre Beals Creek fire on Douglas Forest Protective Association land --  were reported to the Salem Coordination Center this week.

Kevin Weeks - Oregon Department of Forestry

Expect smoke Sunday near 101 in Clatsop County

The Clatsop County Firefighters Association along with Terra Helicopters and Camp Rilea will be conducting a prescribed fire training exercise, an annual training event called "Wildfire 2011", on Saturday July 9 and Sunday July 10 at Camp Rilea near Warrenton.

Smoke will be visible Sunday west of Highway 101 in the Camp Rilea and Sunset Beach areas.

The purpose of the event is to improve fire fighting skills in a prescribed live wildland fire using the Incident Command System. This training also improves the cooperative working relationships between Clatsop County Emergency Services, local rural fire departments and Oregon Department of Forestry.

The skills and lessons learned in this event can carry over easily to emergency situations such as severe winter storms or tsunami alerts. Camp Rilea benefits from hosting this event because the prescribe fire reduces the threat of range fires.

Approximately seventy fire fighters will be training this weekend. Oregon Department of Forestry crews will drill along with Astoria, Cannon Beach, Gearhart, Knappa, Lewis & Clark, Olney, Seaside, Warrenton, Molalla and Lafayette rural fire departments, Pacific County Fire Department and Campbell Group forestland fire prevention resources will be participating.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Thursday, July 7, 2011

ODF assisting with Warm Springs fire

ODF has dispatched one engine from the Central Oregon District to assist the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs with battling a rapidly growing wildfire that broke out Thursday afternoon prior to 2pm near the Upper Dry Creek area of the Warm Springs reservation. Interagency resources from across central Oregon, including a team of Prineville Hotshots, are being mobilized to assist on the fire, which by 5 pm was estimated to be roughly 300 acres in size. ODF is assisting the fire in a resource capacity. Fire management is under the direction of the CTWS.

Caution is urged in the vicinity of US Highway 26 near Warm Springs as the Oregon Department of Transportation may be closing the highway for brief intervals during Thursday night to allow crews to set backfires in an effort to stop the advance of the fire. ODOT is urging motorists to avoid the area.

Highway 3, the primary access road to the Kah-Nee-Tah area, is closed due to the fire. The Oregon Mountain River Chapter of the American Red Cross has been mobilized to provide emergency assistance to those persons affected by the fire.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Red Flag Warning in effect for northern Umatilla County and S Washington state

The National Weather Service in Pendleton has issued a Red Flag Warning for increased wildfire potential in Oregon Zone 631, generally covering northern Umatilla County extending into Washington state.

The Red Flag Warning is in effect from 2:00pm Thursday until 10:00 pm tonight.

Be advised of wind bursts of 10-minute duration in the region carrying sustained speeds of 25 mph but gusts up to 40 mph moving through the region until sunset. Humidity will be estimated between 18-25 percent but will rise overnight.

A Red Flag Warning is issued when critical fire weather conditions are forecast to occur imminently. Combinations of strong winds, low relative humidity and summer temperatures have the potential to create rapid wildfire growth.

Please exercise caution with potential fire sources during this event.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Beals Creek final report - 88 acre fire contained

The final size of the Beals Creek Fire has been mapped at 88 acres. Fire was declared contained at 6 pm Wednesday.

Firefighters strengthened containment lines throughout the day Wednesday and are in the process of mopping up hot spots to prevent future growth. The mop up process is expected to take several days and then will enter patrol status. DFPA engine crews will check the fire area throughout the summer to prevent future flare-ups.

Cooperating agencies on the fire include DFPA, Coos Forest Protective Association, the Oregon Department of Forestry, landowners and several rural fire departments.

The cause of the fire remains under investigation. Anyone with information regarding the cause of the fire is asked to contact DFPA at (541) 672-6507 or the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office at (541) 440-4471.

Follow DFPA on twitter at www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA  or at their website at http://www.dfpa.net/

DFPA has provided photos of the fire on their web site

Tom Fields
Public Information Officer
Douglas Forest Protective Association

Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Beals Creek Fire declared contained

Fire managers will be declaring the Beals Creek fire burning between Days Creek and Canyonville contained at 6:00 Wednesday night. Night crews will be continuing with mop-up activities and monitoring the fire zone using infrared detection equipment.

Cause of the fire remains under investigation.

The fire was reported at about 10:30 p.m. Monday, July 4th in a remote location between Canyonville and Days Creek. Firefighters from Douglas Forest Protective Association and surrounding rural fire departments discovered a five acre fire spreading rapidly in one-year old logging slash, timber and young trees. By Tuesday morning the fire had grown to about 55 acres and had peaked to its current size of 80 acres late Tuesday afternoon.

Cooperating agencies on the fire include DFPA, Coos Forest Protective Association, the Oregon Department of Forestry, landowners and several rural fire departments.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Local fire restrictions now in place in NE Oregon

Beginning at 6:00 a.m. Wednesday, forest and range lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry - Northeast Oregon District went into fire season. This includes private, state, county, municipal, and tribal lands in Union, Baker, Wallowa, and Umatilla counties along with small portions of Malheur, Morrow, and Grant counties.

“Good spring precipitation has created excellent conditions for grass and brush growth.” says Mark Jacques, La Grande Unit Forester for the Oregon Department of Forestry. “Although most fuels are still green at this point, as these fuels cure through the summer, the potential exists for hazardous burning conditions with extreme rates of spread.”

During fire season in northeast Oregon:

• Burning permits are required on all private-owned forest and range lands within the Northeast Forest Protection District for Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF). Contact the local ODF office in La Grande, Baker City, Wallowa, or Pendleton to acquire a burning permit.

• Landowners who conducted burning of slash piles last fall and this past spring are encouraged to check these piles and ensure that they are completely out and all heat is gone. It is not uncommon for recently burned slash piles to have heat remaining in them for several months after the actual burning of the piles.

• Logging and other industrial operations must meet requirements for fire prevention, such as fire tools, water supply, and watchman service when those operations are occurring on private lands protected by ODF. Contact your local Stewardship Forester at ODF offices for more information.

• Campfires must be DEAD OUT! Recreationists are reminded that campfires need to be attended and fully extinguished before being left. Get permission from the landowner prior to starting a campfire.

Above average snowpack and below average temperatures has delayed implementation of fire season, however the extended forecast calls for warmer and drier conditions, dictating a need to enact fire prevention measures across the Northeast Oregon District.

For further information, contact the Oregon Department of Forestry at these local offices:

La Grande Unit (541) 963-3168

Baker City Sub-Unit (541) 523-5831

Wallowa Unit (541) 886-2881

Pendleton Unit (541) 276-3491

To report a fire, dial 9-1-1.

For information on the weekends call the Blue Mountain Interagency Dispatch Center in La Grande, (541) 963-7171

Christie Shaw
ODF Northeast Oregon District – Wallowa Unit

Fireworks Cause of Wildfire near Sisters

Source: Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center

Firefighters from the US Forest Service, Oregon Department of Forestry and Sisters-Camp Sherman Rural Fire Protection District responded quickly to a wildfire that started three miles southwest of Sisters on Tuesday afternoon. The fire grew to 11 acres before crews were able to stop its progress, and was 50 percent contained by Tuesday night.

Fire investigators discovered evidence pointing to the use of fireworks in a dispersed camping area as the cause. No suspects have been identified at this time, and anyone with information should call the Sisters Ranger District.

This incident scene is currently staffed with five engines, three hand crews, and two dozers. Crews also received assistance during the day from two helicopters and one load of retardant from an air tanker. The fire is burning in ponderosa pine/shrub vegetation in an area just west of the Rooster Rock Fire that burned over 6,000 acres last year.

Fireworks are always illegal on federal public lands and state parks, even on the 4th of July, and people found using or possessing fireworks on public lands can receive a fine and can be held responsible for fire suppression and rehabilitation costs in the event that fireworks use causes a wildfire.

With conditions warming on the High Desert, fire officials want to take this time to remind visitors and residents of Central Oregon to be careful with fire. Vegetation is drying quickly, and the lighter fuels like grass and shrubs can be very receptive to an ignition source. Everyone should make sure to extinguish cigarettes inside vehicles and be sure campfires are “dead out” before leaving a site.

West Oregon District enters fire season Monday

Areas protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry’s West Oregon District – including Lincoln and Benton County, western Polk County and the SW corner of Yamhill County – will enter fire season at 1:00 a.m. Monday July 11, 2011

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

NE Oregon on alert as fire season begins; Fire Weather Watch in effect

ODF’s Northeastern Oregon District entered fire season on Wednesday morning July 6, and today the National Weather Service in Pendleton issued a Fire Weather Watch for portions of northern Umatilla County extending into Washington state.

The Fire Weather Watch is recommending caution on Thursday afternoon and Thursday evening as a cold front is predicted to move through northeastern Oregon, producing windy conditions with very low humidity. The affected regions are northern Umatilla County, and the lower Columbia Basin and southern Columbia Basin in Washington.

Wind gusts of 45 mph are predicted, with relative humidity below 20 percent in the region. These factors could contribute to rapid wildfire spread if an ignition occurs. Please exercise caution with potential fire sources during this event.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Beals Creek Fire nears containment - growth of fire stopped Tuesday night

Firefighters pulled containment lines together on the Beals Creek Fire overnight and will work throughout the day Wednesday to strengthen those trails before calling the 80-acre fire fully contained. Crews have begun mopping up around the perimeter of the fire to prevent further spread.


Resources on the fire today include 108 firefighters, seven engines and four water tenders. Two helicopters are standing by should fire activity increase and test containment lines this afternoon.

The fire was reported at about 10:30 p.m. Monday, July 4th in a remote location between Canyonville and Days Creek. Firefighters from Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) and surrounding rural fire departments discovered a five acre fire spreading rapidly in one-year old logging slash, timber and young trees. By Tuesday morning the fire had grown to about 55 acres and had peaked to its current size of 80 acres late Tuesday afternoon.

Cooperating agencies on the fire include DFPA, Coos Forest Protective Association, the Oregon Department of Forestry, landowners and several rural fire departments.

The cause of the fire remains under investigation. Anyone with information regarding the cause of the fire is asked to contact DFPA at (541) 672-6507 or the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office at (541) 440-4471.

Follow DFPA on twitter at www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA or at their website at http://www.dfpa.net/

###

Tom Fields
Public Information Officer
Douglas Forest Protective Association

Tuesday, July 5, 2011

Two Calif air tankers assist on Beals Ck Fire

Two Cal Fire air tankers have joined Oregon forces in battling the Beals Creek Fire east of Canyonville. Size estimate has been revised to 65-70 acres. Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) is leading the firefighting effort on the blaze, which was reported Monday evening. Burning on steep, rugged ground, the fire is dislodging debris down the slope and creating a hazard for firefighters.

Two DFPA and three private hand crews are working the blaze, and two water bucket-slinging helicopters are dousing the flames from above. The fire is currently about 75 percent contained. Cause remains under investigation.

With the declaration of fire season by Oregon Department of Forestry's Northeast Oregon District on the morning of July 6, all but the northwestern Oregon districts will be in fire season.

Beals Ck Fire in Douglas Co. at more than 75 acres

July 5, 2011
Just when everyone thought the fireworks were over, a fire east of Canyonville sent firefighters scrambling into the hills near Days Creek late Monday night. The Beals Creek Fire, located about three miles southwest of Days Creek, was reported at about 10:30 p.m. Monday night and is currently estimated at more than 75 acres this morning. Fire crews and engines from Douglas Forest Protective Association and several fire departments from south Douglas County responded.

The fire is burning in logging slash and timber in steep, rugged terrain not fit for bulldozers. Firefighting hand crews worked throughout the night to scratch a fire trail around the flames. The fire remains uncontained.

Close to 100 firefighters are slated to work the fire today with the support of one helicopter, one bulldozer, seven fire engines and four water tenders. Oregon Department of Forestry and several landowners are assisting in the effort.

Cause of the fire is under investigation. Anyone with information regarding the cause of the fire is asked to contact DFPA at 541-672-6507 or the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office at 541-440-4471.

Fire season is currently in effect. All outdoor debris burning has been suspended. Increasing summer temperatures are causing fire danger to rise and fire professionals are asking the public’s cooperation in their vigilance to prevent human caused fires.

Friday, July 1, 2011

Weekly fire summary - week ending July 1, 2011

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) fire update for the week ending Friday, July 1, 2011. During this period of low fire activity, updates are being sent only when significant fires occur. A weekly summary will be sent on Fridays.


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:
There were no fires 10 acres or larger in size reported on ODF-protected lands during the past week. Currently nine ODF districts are in fire season. The districts in northwestern and northeastern Oregon have not declared fire season yet.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS:
No reports of fire on other lands in Oregon.

When nearly everywhere you look is green, it’s easy to become complacent about fire danger in the forest. But this Fourth of July there is still much that can burn, even after the wet, cool spring. The Oregon Department of Forestry urges Oregonians to be mindful of fire safety over the Fourth and on into fire season.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION:
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/, or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE:
The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. However, because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies commonly work closely together.

This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected land, and on the department's role as a partner in fighting major fires that start on land protected by other agencies.

Comments and questions

The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

Cool, wet weather in the winter of 2016-17 ended Oregon's long drought and left a thick snowpack at higher elevations which will take some time to melt. However, even in non-drought years Oregon's warm, dry summers create conditions that allow for fire to start and spread. In an average summer firefighters still see almost a thousand fires on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.



What we do

Protection jurisdiction

The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state- and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. There are about 30.4 million total acres of forest in Oregon.



Fire suppression policy

The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. While suppressing large fires can cost millions of dollars, economic and environmental damage from wildfires can be many times greater.




Followers

About Me

My photo
Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers in Salem, Ore., maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.