2015 another severe fire season

A cool, wet winter and heavy snowpack delayed the start of fire season in much of western and northeastern Oregon. However, the onset of hotter, drier weather is quickly drying out forests and rangeland, making it easier for fires to start. More than half of ODF-protected lands are in districts that have declared the start of fire season this month. It's especially important as summer approaches to avoid or be extra careful with any potential source of fire in wooded areas. Fire season means the end of most outdoor activities that are high risk for starting a fire, such as debris burning, campfires outside of designated areas, and using tracer ammunition and exploding targets.







Friday, September 30, 2011

NW Oregon relaxes closure requirements Saturday

ODF’s Northwest Oregon Fire Protection District – which includes Clatsop County, Columbia County, Tillamook County, western Washington County and the northwest portion of Yamhill County bordered by Hwy 47 and Hwy 18 – will be ending Regulated Use Closure requirements for the season on Saturday October 1.

For additional information about Regulated Use Closure fire precautions, consult the Oregon Department of Forestry web site: www.oregon.gov/ODF/FIRE/precautionlevel.shtml

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry
FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:

No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF protected lands have been reported during the past 24 hours.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON:

Dollar Lake Fire -- 16 miles south of Hood River – 6,304 acres and 90 percent contained. New closure information is in effect, hunters and recreationists should familiarize themselves with current conditions via the InciWeb page for the fire: www.inciweb.org/incident/2563

Mother Lode – 10 miles NW of Detroit – 2,661 acres and 10 percent contained. Some area closures remain in effect. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2536

Shadow Lake – 15 miles west of Sisters – 10,000 acres and 40 percent contained. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2550

Umpqua Complex -- 9 miles south of Toketee in the Umpqua National Forest – 1,019 acres and 81 percent contained. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2552

Red Cone Complex—within Crater Lake National Park – 1,216 acres and no containment forecast. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2648

Wasco Lake – Burning 10 miles northwest of Camp Sherman in the Deschutes National Forest – 200 acres and 70 percent contained; The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Smoke near Gaston is controlled burn

Sources: Gaston Fire District and ODF

Washington County fire departments are receiving calls concerning a large column of smoke near Hagg Lake that is visible for many miles.


The smoke is from a large controlled burn on the Stimson Mainline near the end of Sain Creek Road on private property. The Oregon Department of Forestry issued a permit for this closely monitored fire, which is expected to burn into Friday.

Unregulated burning remains banned in Washington County until further notice. Recent rains have helped reduce the threat of wildfire, but conditions remain dangerous.

ODF Public Affairs Office

Morning statewide fire summary - September 29, 2011

Though northwest Oregon has been experiencing cooler, rainy weather, fire potential is still high in other regions of Oregon, including northeast Oregon and southwestern Oregon. Continued caution with fire while outdoors is urged.


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:
No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF protected lands have been reported during the past 24 hours.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON:

Dollar Lake Fire -- 16 miles south of Hood River – 6,304 acres and 90 percent contained. New closure information is in effect, hunters and recreationists should familiarize themselves with current conditions via the InciWeb page for the fire: www.inciweb.org/incident/2563

Mother Lode – 10 miles NW of Detroit – 2,620 acres and 10 percent contained. Some area closures remain in effect. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2536

Shadow Lake – 15 miles west of Sisters – 10,000 acres and 40 percent contained. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2550

Umpqua Complex -- 9 miles south of Toketee in the Umpqua National Forest – 1,019 acres and 81 percent contained. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2552

Red Cone Complex—within Crater Lake National Park – 1,216 acres and no containment forecast. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2648

Wasco Lake – Burning 10 miles northwest of Camp Sherman in the Deschutes National Forest – 200 acres and 70 percent contained; The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Fire near Beaverton today is prescribed burn

Portland Metro area residents who may be concerned by wildland fire smoke Thursday in the area of Beaverton’s Cooper Mountain Nature Park should be made aware that this fire is a scheduled prescribed burn to control invasive plant species and reduce wildfire risk through reducing potential fuels for a wildland fire.

The prescribed burn is being jointly managed by Metro, Tualatin Hills Parks and Recreation District and Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue. Please note that all facilities and trails within Cooper Mountain Nature Park will be closed Thursday for safety.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Dry conditions on season opener mean fire caution for hunters

For the Oct. 1 general big game season opener, predicted dry conditions in most forested areas of Oregon underscore the need for hunters to be fire safety conscious. Even though fall is in the air, careless actions can still spark a wildfire.

Parched grasses, brush and other fine fuels can ignite from a variety of sources – an errant spark from a campfire or warming fire, a discarded cigarette, or a hot exhaust system contacting vegetation. And under fall conditions, these fire starts often don’t become apparent until hours or even days later.

A warming fire built on a hillside in the early morning hours to take the chill off may appear to be out when the hunter eventually moves on. But the ashes can retain heat. On the next sunny day, a little wind can rekindle that “dead” fire and cause it to spread into a wildfire.

The safest place for a campfire is in a campground with established fire pits. Before leaving a campfire or warming fire, be sure to douse it repeatedly with water, stirring the ashes each time to ensure it is completely extinguished.

When driving a full-sized vehicle or ATV in the forest, always carry fire equipment required by the jurisdictional land management agency. And before heading to your hunting location, check the current rules on vehicle use. In some areas, off-road use of motorized vehicles may be prohibited.

Likewise with smoking: Check the rules. Depending on the fire danger level, smoking may be restricted to inside a closed vehicle or building. In any case, never discard smoking materials in grass or other vegetation.

The good news for hunters is that the dry conditions are forecast to change Sunday evening with the onset of rain in many areas.

For additional fire safety tips and current fire restrictions, contact the Oregon Department of Forestry or the Keep Oregon Green Association.

Rod Nichols
Oregon Department of Forestry

Shadow Lake Fire - closure areas reduced

Source: Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center

Yesterday, the closure areas were reduced around the Shadow Lake Fire due to the wet, cooler weather and the hard work of fire crews to secure the fire line. The cooler temperatures have also allowed the Deschutes and Willamette National Forests to resume management of the fire.

“The reduced area closure opens up some popular roads and recreation sites,” said Randy Harbick, Fire Management Officer for the McKenzie River Ranger District. “However, since we will still have fire crews and some equipment finishing rehabilitation work, please drive carefully if you visit the area.”

Popular areas now open include:
• Big Lake Campground (in a no services status)

• Big Lake Youth Camp

• Potato Hill/Jack Pine area

• Dry Creek Trailhead

• Belknap and Little Belknap Crater

• Lakes south of Corbett Sno-Park

• Forest Service Road 500

Popular areas that remain closed include Big Lake West Campground, Forest Service Road 810, the Patjens Lake Trail, a portion of Dry Creek Trail and a section of the Pacific Crest Trail. The closure area is subject to change, but due to continued hazards from snags and hotspots within the fire some form of closure will likely remain through the winter.

For more information on the Shadow Lake fire and to view the updated closure map, go to www.inciweb.org/incident/2550  or visit the websites of the Willamette National Forest (www.fs.usda.gov/willamette ) and the Deschutes National Forest (www.fs.usda.gov/centraloregon ). More information is also available by calling the Sisters Ranger District (541-549-7700) and/or the McKenzie River Ranger District (541) 822-3381.

Prescribed burns on federal lands in central Oregon this week

Fuels specialists from the Ochoco National Forest are planning to ignite three prescribed burns beginning Wednesday and continuing through Thursday. The burns are expected to take a total of two days to complete with mop-up and patrolling continuing as needed. Hunters should use caution when passing through these areas after the burns are complete, and should avoid sites with active prescribed fire.

The first burn is the final 80-acres of the Coyote Hills burn on the Crooked River National Grassland. The burn is located adjacent to the east side of Haystack Reservoir and north of FS Rd 9610 and most of the burn was completed this summer. The objective is to improve the health of native plants, restore spring flow and increase forage for wildlife and livestock by using prescribed fire to reduce the number of western juniper on the landscape. Smoke from this burn will be visible from Highways 97 and 26, the communities of Madras and Crooked River Ranch, and from nearby recreation sites such as Haystack Reservoir and Smith Rock State Park.

Specialists will also burn 135 acres in the Spears Meadow area, about 20 miles northeast of Prineville adjacent to Hwy 26. This burn is designed to reduce hazardous fuels along the highway. Smoke will be visible along Highway 26, as well as from nearby ranches, recreation sites and the communities of Prineville and Mitchell. Highway 26 is expected to remain open; however there is the potential for smoke to drift across the road.

The final burn is located in the Maury Mountains, about 30 miles east of Prineville. Specialists will burn approximately 280 acres in the Elk project area. The goal of the burn is to use fire to reduce the number of juniper on the landscape to improve elk habitat. This burn is located in a remote area and should have limited visibility, except to local ranches and people recreating in the area.

The areas will be signed to inform motorists of the prescribed fires. No road closures are anticipated; however, people recreating in or traveling through the areas should use caution as smoke may affect visibility and travel. If motorists encounter smoke as a result of the burning, they should slow down, turn on headlights, and proceed with care. Patrols and mop-up activities will occur during and following ignitions and night patrols will occur on an as-needed basis, depending on conditions. In addition, people should use caution when entering a recently burned area due to the presence of fire-weakened trees that may fall, and watch for dangerous stump holes.

Fuels specialists will follow policies outlined in the Oregon Department of Forestry smoke management plan, which governs controlled burns, and attempts to minimize impacts to visibility and public health. All of these burns are weather dependent and may be cancelled if conditions are not appropriate to complete the burn successfully.

For more information, visit the Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center website at www.fs.fed.us/r6/centraloregon/fire.

Lisa Clark
USDA Crooked River National Grassland and Ochoco National Forest

541.280.9560

Morning statewide fire summary - September 28, 2011

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:


No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF protected lands have been reported during the past 24 hours.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON:

Wasco Lake – Burning 10 miles northwest of Camp Sherman in the Deschutes National Forest – 200 acres and 70 percent contained; The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy.

Dollar Lake Fire -- 16 miles south of Hood River – 6,304 acres and 90 percent contained. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2563

Mother Lode – 10 miles NW of Detroit – 2,620 acres and 10 percent contained. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2536

Alder Springs Fire – 2 miles NW of Crooked River Ranch in the Ochoco National Forest – 1,449 acres and 100 percent contained on Monday.

Umpqua Complex -- 9 miles south of Toketee in the Umpqua National Forest – 1,019 acres and 81 percent contained. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2552

Red Cone Complex-- 16 miles south of Hood River – 1,216 acres and no containment forecast. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2648

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Daily fire update, Sept. 27, 2011

Fires on Oregon Dept. of Forestry-protected lands:
The 25-acre Horse Heaven Fire burning on private lands in the Prineville Unit of the Central Oregon District was fully contained on Monday afternoon. Begun as a prescribed burn, the fire escaped the burn unit and spread to the additional 25 acres of grass, sage and juniper.

The 25-acre Dole Road Fire burning on lands protected by the Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) near Myrtle Creek is fully lined. Resources fighting the fire at its peak included eight fire engines (DFPA), two hand crews (one DFPA, one Douglas Co.), one helicopter (DFPA), two water tenders (Rural Fire Dist.) and one bulldozer (DFPA). Cause of the fire is under investigation.

Other fire information:
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/ - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38.

Monday, September 26, 2011

Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update for Monday, September 26, 2011

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Daily Fire Update for Monday, September 26, 2011.


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:
No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported during the past 24 hours on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION:
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/ - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38 . Note that the InciWeb system is experiencing a high volume of server traffic due to the number of wildland fires burning across the country and response times at times may be slowed.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE:
The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. However, because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies commonly work closely together.

This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected land, and on the department's role as a partner in fighting major fires that start on land protected by other agencies.

**********************************
Jeri Chase, ODF Information Officer
Fire Duty Officer Pager #503-370-0403

Friday, September 23, 2011

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Daily Fire Update for Friday, September 23, 2011.


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:
No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported during the past 24 hours on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

FIRES ON OTHER FOREST LANDS:
The Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center reported that the Alder Springs Fire was reported at 1:45 p.m. yesterday, September 22, burning near Alder Springs in the Whychus Creek drainage of the Crooked River National Grassland about five miles southwest of Culver, Oregon. The fire was estimated by 9 p.m. last night, September 22, to be at 300 acres. It is burning to the east towards Crooked River Ranch and several private ranches.

Alder Springs trailhead/trail and Road 6360 accessing the trailhead are currently closed due to fire suppression activities. A local Type 3 Incident Management Team is scheduled to take command of the fire today, Friday, September 23. Cause of the fire is under investigation.

With many fires recently contained and the potential for others to start, hunters heading out for bow season should use caution when heading out to their units. They should avoid camping in or hiking through areas with active fire, watch for increased fire traffic on forest and rangeland roads and should watch for dangerous burned out stump-holes and snags in recently burned areas. Check in with local agencies before you head out to see if there are any additional fire restrictions or campground closures.

The Alder Springs Fire is not threatening any private forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

More information: Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center at www.fs.fed.us/r6/centraloregon/fire/ or 541-416-6811.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION:
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/ - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38 . Note that the InciWeb system is experiencing a high volume of server traffic due to the number of wildland fires burning across the country and response times at times may be slowed.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE:
The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. However, because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies commonly work closely together.

This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected land, and on the department's role as a partner in fighting major fires that start on land protected by other agencies.

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update for Thursday, September 22, 2011

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Daily Fire Update for Wednesday, September 21, 2011.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:
No new fires 20 acres or larger were reported during the past 24 hours on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION:
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/ - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38 . Note that the InciWeb system is experiencing a high volume of server traffic due to the number of wildland fires burning across the country and response times at times may be slowed.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE:
The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. However, because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies commonly work closely together.

This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected land, and on the department's role as a partner in fighting major fires that start on land protected by other agencies.

******************************************
Jeri Chase, ODF Information Officer
Fire Duty Officer Pager #503-370-0403

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update for Wednesday, September 21, 2011

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Daily Fire Update for Wednesday, September 21, 2011.


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:
No new fires 20 acres or larger were reported during the past 24 hours on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION:
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/ - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38 . Note that the InciWeb system is experiencing a high volume of server traffic due to the number of wildland fires burning across the country and response times at times may be slowed.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE:
The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. However, because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies commonly work closely together.

This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected land, and on the department's role as a partner in fighting major fires that start on land protected by other agencies.
 
*****************************
Jeri Chase, ODF Information Officer
Fire Duty Officer Pager # 503-370-0403

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update for Tuesday, September 20, 2011

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Daily Fire Update for Tuesday, September 20, 2011.
FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:
Correction to yesterday’s fire report: The Dole Road Fire, which was reported on Sunday afternoon, September 18, was located in the Southern Oregon Area (not SWO, as reported yesterday)/Douglas Forest Protective Association. The fire area, which was approximately 25 acres, is fully lined and contained, in final mop-up and monitoring. The cause of this fire, also mistakenly not reported in yesterday’s report, is under investigation. Unless the situation changes, this will be the last report on this fire.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON:
The National Incident Management Organization that was in Oregon assigned to the Shadow Lake Fire has turned management of the fire over to a local team. The information about fires burning in Oregon on Twitter at http://twitter.com/#!/orfireinfo/, on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/oregonfireinfo, and a blog at http://orfireinfo.net/ will no longer be maintained by this team.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION:
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/ - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38 . Note that the InciWeb system is experiencing a high volume of server traffic due to the number of wildland fires burning across the country and response times at times may be slowed.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE:
The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. However, because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies commonly work closely together.

This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected land, and on the department's role as a partner in fighting major fires that start on land protected by other agencies.


*****************************
 
Jeri Chase, ODF Incident Information Officer
Fire Duty Officer Pager #503-370-0403

Monday, September 19, 2011

Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update for Monday, September 19, 2011

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Daily Fire Update for Friday, September 19, 2011.


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:
SWO-Douglas Forest Protective Association: The Dole Road Fire was reported on Sunday afternoon, September 18. The fire, approximately 25 acres, is now lined, contained, and in full mop-up. Unless the situation changes, this will be the only report on this fire.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON:
The National Incident Management Organization that was in Oregon assigned to the Shadow Lake Fire has turned management of the fire over to a local team. The information about fires burning in Oregon on Twitter at http://twitter.com/#!/orfireinfo/, on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/oregonfireinfo, and a blog at http://orfireinfo.net/ will no longer be maintained by this team.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION:
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/ - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38 . Note that the InciWeb system is experiencing a high volume of server traffic due to the number of wildland fires burning across the country and response times at times may be slowed.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE:
The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. However, because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies commonly work closely together.

This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected land, and on the department's role as a partner in fighting major fires that start on land protected by other agencies.

************************************
Jeri Chase, ODF Information Officer
Fire Duty Officer Pager #503-370-0403

Thursday, September 15, 2011

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Daily Fire Update for Thursday, September 15, 2011.


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:
No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF-protected lands have been reported during the past 24 hours.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON:
Many of the following fires involve road or other resource-area closures in effect. Please check the information that is available before heading out to areas these fires may be impacting.

In addition to the other fire information resources that are always available in Oregon during fire season, while the National Incident Management Organization is in Oregon assigned to the Shadow Lake Fire, Kris Erikson, federal Incident Information Officer, is also providing information about fires burning in Oregon on Twitter at http://twitter.com/#!/orfireinfo/, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/oregonfireinfo, and on a blog at http://orfireinfo.net/. These are excellent resources for both the public and the media to monitor and/or sign up to receive updates.

North-Central Oregon

The 108,154-acre High Cascades Fire Complex, reported August 24 burning along the Deschutes River, is now 95 percent contained. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is leading the suppression effort on the lightning-caused fire. The Blue Mountain Incident Management Team that has been assigned to this fire will turn fire management back over to the local unit on Friday morning. Unless the situation changes, this will be the last report in these ODF updates about this incident. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2546.

The 6,273-acre Dollar Lake Fire, reported August 27 burning 16 miles south of Hood River, is now 50 percent contained. The U.S. Forest Service is leading the suppression effort on the lightning-caused fire. A community briefing about the Dollar Lake Fire is scheduled for 7 p.m .this evening, September 15, at the Parkdale Fire Station. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2563.

The 2,152-acre lightning-caused Mother Lode Fire, reported August 26, burning 10 miles northwest of Detroit in the Mount Hood National Forest is five percent contained. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2636.

The 9,987-acre Shadow Lake Fire, reported August 28 burning 15 miles west of Sisters, is 35 percent contained. The U.S. Forest Service is managing this lightning-caused fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy. Favorable weather conditions are continuing to contribute to aid firefighter efforts. Portions of the closure area will re-open to the public on Friday, September 16, and fire management officials will continue to make additional changes to the current closure order over the next few weeks as part of a phased approach to re-open popular recreation and hunting areas as quickly and safely as possible, as well as associated temporary fire restriction changes. Check forest websites or contact the Sisters Ranger District (541-549-7700) or the McKenzie Ranger District (541-822-3381) for a list of roads or hiking trails open for use. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2550.

The 88-acre Substitute Fire, reported August 24, is burning in the Willamette National Forest, 14 miles southeast of McKenzie Bridge in the Three Sisters Wilderness on the east slopes of Substitute Point. The U.S. Forest Service is managing this lightning-caused fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy. Unless the situation changes, this will be the last report in these ODF updates about this fire. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2633.

Northeast Oregon

The 119-acre lightning-caused Chicken Hill Fire, reported September 5, burning 48 miles southwest of LaGrande, is now 100 percent contained. The U.S. Forest Service is managing this fire, which transitioned to a local fire management team today. Unless the situation changes, this will be the last report in these ODF updates about this fire. Additional incident information is available through InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2660.

The 353-acre lightning-caused Jim White Ridge Complex, reported August 3, is burning 10 miles east of Cove. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fires with a monitor/confine/contain strategy.

Southern Oregon

The 849-acre lightning-caused Umpqua Complex of fires, reported on September 8, burning 9 miles south of Toketee, near Diamond Lake and the North Umpqua Ranger Districts in the Umpqua National Forest, is now 65 percent contained. An interagency incident management team from southern California assumed command of the fire on September 11. Additional information is available through InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2652.

The lightning-caused 900-acre Red Cone Complex of fires is burning 10 miles northwest of the Crater Lake National Park headquarters. The fire, which began August 20, is being managed by the National Parks Service with a monitor/confine/contain strategy. Additional incident information is now available on InciWeb at: www.inciweb.org/incident/2648/.

Eastern Oregon

The 6100-acre lightning-caused Garden Fire, reported September 8, is burning eight miles northeast of Fort Rock. This lightning-caused fire is burning in grasslands, brush and juniper within the BLM Lakeview District, and is 67 percent contained. An interagency incident management team has been assigned to this incident.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION:
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/ - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38 . Note that the InciWeb system is experiencing a high volume of server traffic due to the number of wildland fires burning across the country and response times at times may be slowed.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE:
The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. However, because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies commonly work closely together.

This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected land, and on the department's role as a partner in fighting major fires that start on land protected by other agencies.
 
*************************************
Jeri Chase, ODF Information Officer
Fire Duty Officer Pager # 503-370-0403

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update for Wednesday, September 14, 2011

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Daily Fire Update for Wednesday, September 14, 2011.


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:
No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF-protected lands have been reported during the past 24 hours.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON:
Many of the following fires involve road or other resource-area closures that are in effect. Please check the information that is available before heading out to areas that these fires may be impacting.

In addition to the other fire information resources that are always available in Oregon during fire season, while the National Incident Management Organization is in Oregon assigned to the Shadow Lake Fire, Kris Erikson, federal Incident Information Officer, is also providing information about fires burning in Oregon on Twitter at http://twitter.com/#!/orfireinfo/, on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/oregonfireinfo , and on a blog at http://orfireinfo.net/. These are excellent resources for both the public and the media to monitor and/or sign up to receive updates.

North-Central Oregon

The 108,154-acre High Cascades Fire Complex, reported August 24 burning along the Deschutes River, is now 95 percent contained. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is leading the suppression effort on the lightning-caused fire. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2546.

The 6,249-acre Dollar Lake Fire, reported August 27 burning 16 miles south of Hood River, is now 45 percent contained. The U.S. Forest Service is leading the suppression effort on the lightning-caused fire. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2563.

The 2,063-acre Mother Lode Fire, reported August 26, burning 10 miles northwest of Detroit in the Mount Hood National Forest is 5 percent contained. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2636.

The 9,987-acre Shadow Lake Fire, reported August 28 burning 15 miles west of Sisters, is 35 percent contained. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy. Favorable weather conditions are contributing to firefighter efforts. The McKenzie River National Scenic Trail and Clear Lake Resort both plan to re-open by this week-end. While closures are still in effect in both the Deschutes and Willamette national forests due to this fire, potential opportunities to reduce those closure areas are being evaluated. Check forest websites or contact the Sisters Ranger District (541-549-7700) or the McKenzie Ranger District (541-822-3381) for a list of roads or hiking trails open for use. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2550.

The 88-acre Substitute Fire, reported August 24, is burning in the Willamette National Forest, 14 miles southeast of McKenzie Bridge in the Three Sisters Wilderness on the east slopes of Substitute Point. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2633.

Northeast Oregon
The 8,350-acre Cactus Mountain Fire, reported September 7 burning in grassland 17 miles north/northeast of Imnaha in Wallowa County, is 90 percent contained and will be turned over to a local fire team. Unless the situation changes, this will be the last report in these ODF updates about this fire. Additional incident information is available through InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2661.

The 119-acre Chicken Hill Fire, reported September 5 burning 48 miles southwest of LaGrande, is now 85 percent contained and will be transitioning to a local team. The U.S. Forest Service is managing this fire. Additional incident information is available through InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2660.

The 353-acre Jim White Ridge Complex, reported August 3, is burning 10 miles east of Cove. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fires with a monitor/confine/contain strategy.
Southern Oregon

The 100-acre Lone Mountain Fire, reported September 9, burned in grass, brush, and timber about 4 miles southwest of O’Brien, in Josephine County. The fire is about 100 acres and 75 percent contained. Cause of the fire is under investigation. Unless the situation changes, this will be the last report in these ODF updates about this fire. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2655.

The 770-acre Umpqua Complex of fires, reported on September 8, burning 9 miles south of Toketee, near Diamond Lake and the North Umpqua Ranger Districts in the Umpqua National Forest, is 10 percent contained. An incident management team from southern California assumed command of the fire on September 11. Additional incident information is available through InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2652.

The 620-acre Red Cone Complex of fires is burning 10 miles northwest of the Crater Lake National Park headquarters. The fire, which began August 20, is being managed by the National Parks Service with a monitor/confine/contain strategy. Additional incident information is now available on InciWeb at: www.inciweb.org/incident/2648/.

The 467-acre Little Butte Fire, reported on September 5, burning on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest approximately 16 miles northeast of Medford, is 95 percent contained. ODF provided initial attack resources and the fire is being managed through a unified command of Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest and ODF.

Eastern Oregon

The 1,400-acre Buffalo Fire, reported September 8, is burning 23 miles southeast of Christmas Valley on BLM Lakeview District grasslands. The fire is 95 percent contained.

The 6100-acre Garden Fire, reported September 8, is burning 8 miles northeast of Fort Rock. This lightning-caused fire is burning in grasslands, brush and juniper within the BLM Lakeview District, and is 50 percent contained. An interagency incident management team is being assigned to this incident.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION:
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/ - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38. Note that the InciWeb system is experiencing a high volume of server traffic due to the number of wildland fires burning across the country and response times at times may be slowed.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE:
The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. However, because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies commonly work closely together.

This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected land, and on the department's role as a partner in fighting major fires that start on land protected by other agencies.

************************************
Jeri Chase, ODF Information Officer
Fire Duty Officer Pager #: 503-370-0403

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Oregon Department of Forestry Daily Fire Update for Tuesday, September 13, 2011

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Daily Fire Update for Tuesday, September 13, 2011.


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:
No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF-protected lands have been reported during the past 24 hours.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON:
Many of the following fires involve road or other resource-area closures that are in effect. Please check the information that is available before heading out to areas that many of these fires may be impacting.

In addition to the other fire information resources that are always available in Oregon during fire season, while the National Incident Management Organization is in Oregon assigned to the Shadow Lake Fire, Kris Erikson, federal Incident Information Officer, is also providing information about fires burning in Oregon on Twitter at http://twitter.com/#!/orfireinfo, on Facebook at  http://www.facebook.com/oregonfireinfo#!, and on a blog at http://orfireinfo.net . These are excellent resources for both the public and the media to monitor and/or sign up to receive updates.

North Central Oregon
The 108,154-acre High Cascades Fire Complex, reported August 24 burning along the Deschutes River, is now 90 percent contained. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is leading the suppression effort on the lightning-caused fire. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2546 .

The 6,169-acre Dollar Lake Fire, reported August 27 burning 16 miles south of Hood River, is now 40 percent contained. The U.S. Forest Service is leading the suppression effort on the lightning-caused fire. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2563 .

The 2,063-acre Mother Lode Fire, reported August 26, is burning 10 miles northwest of Detroit. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2636.

The 9,987-acre Shadow Lake Fire, reported August 28 burning 15 miles west of Sisters, is 30 percent contained. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy. Potential smoke impacts along Highway 20 and in Sisters this morning due to air inversion, but expected to lift later in the day. A community meeting is scheduled for tonight, September 13, at 7 p.m. at the McKenzie High School Gym in Blue River. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2550.

The 88-acre Substitute Fire, reported August 24, is burning in the Willamette National Forest, 14 miles southeast of McKenzie Bridge. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy. InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2633.

Northeast Oregon

The 8,100-acre Cactus Mountain Fire, was reported September 7, burning in grassland 17 miles north/northeast of Imnaha in Wallowa County. Though primarily on federal lands, 130 acres of the fire are under ODF protection. The Fire is reported as 50 percent contained this morning. Additional information is available through InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2661.

The 119-acre Chicken Hill Fire, reported September 5, burning 48 miles southwest of LaGrande, is now 75 percent contained. The U.S. Forest Service is managing this fire. Additional information is available through InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2660.

The 353-acre Jim White Ridge Complex, reported August 3, is burning 10 miles east of Cove. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fires with a monitor/confine/contain strategy.

Southern Oregon

The 100-acre Lone Mountain Fire, reported September 9, burning in grass, brush, and timber about 4 miles southwest of O’Brien, in Josephine County. The fire is about 100 acres and 95 percent contained. A unified command of the fire has been established between the U.S. Forest Service, Medford District BLM, and ODF. The Oregon California Interagency Incident Management Team (ORCA) assumed fire suppression management of the fire under the unified command. An incident command post has been established at Lake Selmac County Park with over 270 fire fighters and support personnel actively working to quickly suppress the Lone Mountain Fire. Cause of the fire is under investigation. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2655.

The 770-acre Umpqua Complex of fires, reported on September 8, burning 9 miles south of Toketee, near Diamond Lake and the North Umpqua Ranger Districts in the Umpqua National Forest, is 10 percent contained. An incident management team from southern California assumed command of the fire on September 11. Additional information is available through InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2652.

The 620-acre Red Cone Complex of fires is burning 10 miles north/northwest of the Crater Lake National Park headquarters. The fire, which began August 20, is being managed by the National Parks Service with a monitor/confine/contain strategy.

The 467-acre Little Butte Fire, reported on September 5, burning on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest approximately 12 miles northeast of Medford, is 95 percent contained. ODF provided initial attack resources and the fire is being managed through a unified command of Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest and ODF. Fire lines have been completed and firefighters are aggressively mopping-up to meet containment objectives. Fire behavior is expected to pick up early in the day and be fairly extreme due to hot and dry weather forecast for the remainder of the week in this area.

Eastern Oregon

The 1,400-acre Buffalo Fire, reported September 8, is burning 23 miles southeast of Christmas Valley on BLM Lakeview District grasslands. The fire is 80 percent contained.

The 7,000-acre Garden Fire, reported September 8, is burning 8 miles northeast of Fort Rock. This lightning-caused fire is burning in grasslands, brush and juniper within the BLM Lakeview District, and is 50 percent contained.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION:
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/ or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38

ABOUT THIS UPDATE:
The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. However, because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies commonly work closely together.

This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected land, and on the department's role as a partner in fighting major fires that start on land protected by other agencies.

*************
Jeri Chase, Incident Information Officer
Fire Duty Officer Pager #: 503-370-0403

Monday, September 12, 2011

Expanded Red Flag Warning for southern Oregon

The Red Flag Warning issued by the National Weather Service in Medford for high wildfire potential in Klamath County, Lake County and western Harney County has been expanded to cover eastern Jackson and eastern Douglas County as well. The warning is in effect until 11:00 Monday night.

Thunderstorm activity is predicted bringing with in isolated lightning strikes.

A Red Flag Warning is the highest fire forecast warning issued by the National Weather Service to warn of conditions that are ideal for wildland fire ignition and propagation. When humidity is very low, wildland fuels are extremely dry and when high winds are accompanied with multiple lightning strikes, the Red Flag Warning becomes a critical statement for firefighting agencies, which often alter their staffing and equipment resources dramatically to accommodate the forecast risk.

To the public, a Red Flag Warning means high fire danger with increased probability of a quickly spreading vegetation fire in the area within 24 hours.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Public's help sought to determine SW Oregon fire causes

Eight fires in the O’Brien area have been determined to be of suspicious origin, and the Oregon Dept. of Forestry and the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest are seeking the public’s help in finding the person responsible for setting these fires. The first fire of suspicious origin was set June 13 and the most recent was 79-acre Lone Mtn. Fire, which started Sept. 9.


Anyone who saw a person or vehicle in the area of a wildfire in the O’Brien area this summer is encouraged to call (800) 452-7888, toll-free, to reach the Oregon Council Against Arson. Information is confidential, so please leave your name, a phone number, whether you have photographs or video of one or more of these fires in the early stages, and a description of a vehicle or person that you saw.

Brian Ballou
Oregon Department of Forestry, SW Oregon District

Morning statewide fire summary - September 12, 2011

No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF protected lands have been reported during the past 24 hours.


FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON:

** NORTH-CENTRAL OREGON

The 108,096-acre High Cascades Fire complex reported Aug. 24 burning along the Deschutes River is 85 percent contained. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is leading the suppression effort on the lightning-caused fire. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2546

The 5,843-acre Dollar Lake Fire reported Aug. 27 burning 16 miles south of Hood River is 35 percent contained. The U.S. Forest Service is leading the suppression effort on the lightning-caused fire. An area of concern is the potential impact of the fire on the Bull Run watershed for the City of Portland. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2563

The 1,670-acre Mother Lode fire is burning 10 miles northwest of Detroit. A full perimeter has been established around the fire, reported on Aug. 26. The fire is 5 percent contained. An interagency incident management team assumed command of the fire Friday at 12:00 Noon. Trail and area closures are in effect, also Bull of the Woods historic lookout is at risk. InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2636

The 9,972-acre Shadow Lake Fire reported Aug. 28 burning 15 miles west of Sisters is 25 percent contained. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy. Smoke impacts on Highway 20, also Sisters/Madras area. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2550

The 88-acre Substitute fire is burning in the Willamette National Forest 14 miles southeast of McKenzie Bridge. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy. InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2633

** NORTHEAST OREGON

The 8,000-acre Cactus Mountain fire was reported Wednesday burning in grassland 17 miles northeast of Imnaha in Wallowa County. Though primarily on federal lands, 130 acres of the fire are under ODF protection. Active fire spread on Saturday. Several structures are in the fire vicinity and potentially threatened. Cause of the fire is under investigation. Fire is 20 percent contained. The NW Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team assumed command of the fire Friday morning. Closures related to the fire area were issued Monday morning. Additional information is available through InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2661

The 120-acre Chicken Hill fire is burning in timber off FR 5185 in the Wallowa Whitman NF northwest of Baker City. The lightning-caused fire is 60 percent contained. Additional information is available through InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2660

The 315-acre Jim White Ridge Complex reported Aug. 3 is burning 10 miles east of Cove. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fires with a monitor/confine/contain strategy.

** SOUTHERN OREGON

The Lone Mountain fire was reported Friday afternoon burning in grass, brush and timber about 12 miles southwest of Cave Junction in Josephine County. The fire is about 100 acres and 95 percent contained. A unified command of the fire has been established between the U.S. Forest Service, Medford District BLM and Oregon Department of Forestry. The Oregon California Interagency Incident Management Team (ORCA) assumed fire suppression management of the fire under the unified command. An incident command post has been established at Lake Selmac County Park with over 270 fire fighters and support personnel actively working to quickly suppress the Lone Mountain Fire. Cause of the fire is under investigation. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2655

The 710-acre Umpqua Complex of fires burning 9 miles south of Toketee in the Umpqua National Forest began Aug. 24. An incident management team from southern California assumed command of the fire Sunday. Additional information is available through InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2652

The 620-acre Red Cone complex of fires is burning 10 miles north of the Crater Lake National Park headquarters. The fire, which began Aug. 20, is being managed by the U.S. Forest Service with a monitor/confine/contain strategy.

The 467-acre Little Butte fire burning on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest 16 miles northeast of Medford is now 95 percent contained. The fire was reported last Monday and Oregon Department of Forestry provided initial attack resources. Fire is managed through a unified command of Rogue River-Siskiyou NF and ODF. Fire lines have been completed and firefighters are aggressively mopping-up to meet containment objectives, seeking to reach full containment by Sunday.

** EASTERN OREGON

The 1,400-acre Buffalo fire is burning 23 miles southeast of Christmas Valley on BLM Lakeview District grasslands. This lightning-caused fire is 80 percent contained

The 3,000-acre Garden fire is burning 18 miles northeast of Fort Rock. This lightning-caused fire is burning in grasslands, brush and juniper within the BLM Lakeview District. Fire is 50 percent contained. Increase in acreage due to burnout operations to consume fuels

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Additional Red Flag Warning for Klamath Basin Monday

The National Weather Service in Medford has issued a Red Flag Warning for high wildfire potential in Klamath County, Lake County and western Harney County, including the Fremont-Winema National Forest and BLM lands, from 11:00 AM Monday until 11:00 Monday night.

Thunderstorm activity is predicted, bringing with it isolated lightning strikes.

A Red Flag Warning is the highest fire forecast warning issued by the National Weather Service to warn of conditions that are ideal for wildland fire ignition and propagation. When humidity is very low, wildland fuels are extremely dry and when high winds are accompanied with multiple lightning strikes, the Red Flag Warning becomes a critical statement for firefighting agencies, which often alter their staffing and equipment resources dramatically to accommodate the forecast risk.

To the public, a Red Flag Warning means high fire danger with increased probability of a quickly spreading vegetation fire in the area within 24 hours.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Cactus Mountain fire in Wallowa County - Sunday update

Fire Size:  7,668 Acres

Containment: 10%
Location: 17 miles N/NE of Imnaha
Cause: Under Investigation
Personnel: Approximately 120
Closures/Restrictions:  Dug Bar Road at Fence Creek to all public access

Fire Information:
(541) 432-6028
Staffed 8a.m.-9p.m.
cactusmtnfire0616@gmail.com

Inciweb
http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2661


Yesterday was a good day on the fire. Firefighters continued to keep the fire east of Summit Ridge, and to the west of the Snake River. Structure protection for the Litch Ranch, along with additional work in the Cow Creek area was accomplished. Smoke jumpers and aircraft worked the ridges. and 44 loads of retardant were dropped totaling 27,776 gallons. Additional bucket drops of water were also used.


Crews will continue today to notify hunters in the Lord Flat area of this fire, as a precautionary measure for public safety. Approximately 30 vehicles were located at the gate on the road leading into Lord Flat.

Fire behavior is expected to be intense Sunday, as temperatures in the canyon, will reach 100 degrees or higher. Relative humidity is forecasted to be in the single digits. Wind gusts should be around 18 mph in the canyon. Fire could potentially spot today up to a half-mile away. There will be additional heavy helicopters assisting in the suppression effort today.

Red Flag Warning for Klamath Basin Sunday

The National Weather Service in Medford has issued a Red Flag Warning for high wildfire potential in eastern Douglas, eastern Jackson, Klamath and Lake counties from 1:00 p.m. today until 11:00 Sunday night.

Thunderstorm activity is predicted bringing with in isolated lightning strikes.

A Red Flag Warning is the highest fire forecast warning issued by the National Weather Service to warn of conditions that are ideal for wildland fire ignition and propagation. When humidity is very low, wildland fuels are extremely dry and when high winds are accompanied with multiple lightning strikes, the Red Flag Warning becomes a critical statement for firefighting agencies, which often alter their staffing and equipment resources dramatically to accommodate the forecast risk.

To the public, a Red Flag Warning means high fire danger with increased probability of a quickly spreading vegetation fire in the area within 24 hours. Please be very careful with fire and prevent accidental wildfire ignitions from sparks or open flame.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Fire updates statewide - Sunday AM September 11, 2011

** NORTH-CENTRAL OREGON


The 108,096-acre High Cascades Fire complex reported Aug. 24 burning along the Deschutes River is 80 percent contained. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is leading the suppression effort on the lightning-caused fire. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2546

The 4,763-acre Dollar Lake Fire reported Aug. 27 burning 16 miles south of Hood River is 35 percent contained. The U.S. Forest Service is leading the suppression effort on the lightning-caused fire. An area of concern is the potential impact of the fire on the Bull Run watershed for the City of Portland. Drivers on Oregon Hwy 35 are cautioned to turn on their headlights, slow down, and watch for fire traffic. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2563

The 1,235-acre Mother Lode fire is burning 10 miles northwest of Detroit. A full perimeter has been established around the fire, reported on Aug. 26. The fire is not contained. An interagency incident management team assumed command of the fire Friday at 12:00 Noon. Bull of the Woods historic lookout is at risk. InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2636

The 7,900-acre Shadow Lake Fire reported Aug. 28 burning 15 miles west of Sisters is 15 percent contained. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy. A new closure area is in effect – the closure now extends to the west along the southeast quadrant of Highways 20 and 126. This includes a portion of the McKenzie River Trail. Evacuations remain in place; youth camp staff will be allowed access on Sunday. Pacific Crest Trail closed. Road access into Big Lake restricted. Smoke impacts on Eugene/Springfield area. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2550

The 116-acre Substitute fire is burning in the Willamette National Forest 14 miles southeast of McKenzie Bridge. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy. InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2633

** NORTHEAST OREGON

The 7,700-acre Cactus Mountain fire was reported Wednesday burning in grassland 17 miles northeast of Imnaha in Wallowa County. Though primarily on federal lands, 130 acres of the fire are under ODF protection. Active fire spread on Saturday. Several structures are in the fire vicinity and potentially threatened. Cause of the fire is under investigation. Fire is 10 percent contained. An interagency incident management team assumed command of the fire Friday morning. Additional information is available through InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2661

The 120-acre Chicken Hill fire is burning in timber off FR 5185 in the Wallowa Whitman NF northwest of Baker City. The lightning-caused fire is 40 percent contained. Additional information is available through InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2660

The 296-acre Jim White Ridge Complex reported Aug. 3 is burning 10 miles east of Cove. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fires with a monitor/confine/contain strategy.

** SOUTHERN OREGON

The Lone Mountain fire was reported Friday afternoon burning in grass, brush and timber about 12 miles southwest of Cave Junction in Josephine County. The fast-growing fire was reported at about 200-250 acres in size Saturday morning on a mix of U.S. Forest Service and BLM land ownerships. A unified command of the fire has been established between USFS and Oregon Department of Forestry, as ODF provides fire services under contract to the BLM lands. No containment estimate made. An extended attack on the fire is expected, as the fire is burning in very difficult terrain under continued hot, windy conditions. Five engines, 3 crews, 2 water tenders and one bulldozer are assigned to the fire Saturday, also support from two helicopters. Cause of the fire is under investigation. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2655

The 512-acre Skookum Complex of fires burning 9 miles south of Toketee in the Umpqua National Forest began Aug. 24. An incident management team is preparing to start management of the fire on Sunday. Additional information is available through InciWeb: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2652

The 620-acre Red Cone complex of fires is burning 10 miles north of the Crater Lake National Park headquarters. The fire, which began Aug. 20, is being managed by the U.S. Forest Service with a monitor/confine/contain strategy.

The 467-acre Little Butte fire burning on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest 16 miles northeast of Medford is now 95 percent contained. The fire was reported Monday and Oregon Department of Forestry provided initial attack resources. Fire is managed through a unified command of Rogue River-Siskiyou NF and ODF. Fire lines have been completed and firefighters are aggressively mopping-up to meet containment objectives, seeking to reach full containment by Sunday.

** EASTERN OREGON

The 1,400-acre Buffalo fire is burning 23 miles southeast of Christmas Valley on BLM Lakeview District grasslands. This lightning-caused fire is 80 percent contained

The 1,250-acre Garden fire is burning 18 miles northeast of Fort Rock. This lightning-caused fire is burning in grasslands within the BLM Lakeview District. Fire is 50 percent contained.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Saturday, September 10, 2011

Update on Cactus Mountain fire

The Cactus Mountain fire 17 miles northeast of Imnaha in NE Oregon is at 6,475 acres and 25 percent contained on Saturday morning.

Yesterday, fire command was transferred to NW Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team. Firefighting strategies and tactics were developed, with firefighter safety, and protecting private land, key elements of the plan. This fire is being managed with close cooperation with the Oregon Department of Forestry.


The objective is to keep this fire east of the Imnaha River, south and west of the Snake River, northeast of Cow Creek, and north of private lands. There are sensitive resources and historical structures that need protection in the next 2 operational periods.

Crews were successful in protecting the structures at Dug Bar yesterday, when the fire made a run in that direction, with focus on the Litch Ranch in Cow Creek. Temperatures today in the canyon are forecasted to be in the upper 90’s. Crews will work today to notify the hunters in the Lord Flat area, as a precautionary measure for public safety.

Cactus Mountain Fire Information
(541) 432-6028
 cactusmtnfire0618@gmail.com

Lone Mountain fire update

The Lone Mountain fire was reported Friday afternoon burning in grass, brush and timber about 12 miles southwest of Cave Junction in Josephine County.


The fast-growing fire is about 200-250 acres in size Saturday morning on a mix of U.S. Forest Service and BLM land ownerships. A unified command of the fire has been established between USFS and Oregon Department of Forestry, as ODF provides fire services under contract to the BLM lands. No containment estimate made.

An extended attack on the fire is expected, as the fire is burning in very difficult terrain under continued hot, windy conditions. Five engines, 3 crews, 2 water tenders and one bulldozer are assigned to the fire Saturday, also support from two helicopters. Cause of the fire is under investigation.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Lone Mountain fire in SW Oregon

The Lone Mountain fire was reported Friday afternoon burning in grass, brush and timber about 12 miles southwest of Cave Junction in Josephine County. The fire is about 60 acres in size on a mix of U.S. Forest Service and BLM land ownerships. A unified command of the fire has been established between USFS and Oregon Department of Forestry, as ODF provides fire services under contract to the BLM lands. No containment estimate made. An extended attack on the fire is expected, as the fire is burning in very difficult terrain under continued hot, windy conditions. Nine engines and one bulldozer were used on the fire Friday, also support from two helicopters. Cause of the fire is under investigation.
Kevin Weeks - Oregon Department of Forestry

Morning statewide fire summary - September 10, 2011

FIRES ON LANDS OTHER THAN ODF-PROTECTED IN OREGON:


** NORTH-CENTRAL OREGON

The 107,911-acre High Cascades Fire complex reported Aug. 24 burning along the Deschutes River is 80 percent contained. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is leading the suppression effort on the lightning-caused fire. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2546

The 4,678-acre Dollar Lake Fire reported Aug. 27 burning 16 miles south of Hood River is 30 percent contained. The U.S. Forest Service is leading the suppression effort on the lightning-caused fire. An area of concern is the potential impact of the fire on the Bull Run watershed for the City of Portland. Drivers on Oregon Hwy 35 are cautioned to turn on their headlights, slow down, and watch for fire traffic. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2563

The 850-acre Mother Lode fire is burning 10 miles northwest of Detroit. A full perimeter has been established around the fire, reported on Aug. 26. The fire is not contained. An interagency incident management team assumed command of the fire Friday at 12:00 Noon. Bull of the Woods historic lookout is at risk.

The 7,329-acre Shadow Lake Fire reported Aug. 28 burning 15 miles west of Sisters is uncontained. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy. A new closure area is in effect – the closure now extends to the west along the southeast quadrant of Highways 20 and 126. This includes a portion of the McKenzie River Trail. Evacuations remain in place; youth camp staff will be allowed access on Sunday. Pacific Crest Trail closed. Road access into Big Lake restricted. Bend, Sisters, Black Butte Ranch and both Hwy 20 and Hwy 126 have decreased visibility. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2550

The 115-acre Substitute fire is burning in the Willamette National Forest 14 miles southeast of McKenzie Bridge. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy.
** NORTHEAST OREGON

The 4,000-acre Cactus Mountain fire was reported Wednesday burning in grassland 17 miles northeast of Imnaha in Wallowa County. Though primarily on federal lands, 130 acres of the fire are under ODF protection. Five ODF engines and three crews have been assigned to the fire along with resource support from helicopters, one tender and one bulldozer. A portion of the fire is within the Hells Canyon Wilderness Area. Federal initial attack resources included engines, crews, helicopters and Grangeville (ID) smoke jumpers. Several structures are in the fire vicinity and potentially threatened. Cause of the fire is under investigation. Fire is 25 percent contained. An interagency incident management team assumed command of the fire Friday morning.

The 120-acre Chicken Hill fire is burning in timber off FR 5185 in the Wallowa Whitman NF northwest of Baker City. The lightning-caused fire is 40 percent contained.

The 296-acre Jim White Ridge Complex reported Aug. 3 is burning 10 miles east of Cove. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fires with a monitor/confine/contain strategy.

** SOUTHERN OREGON

The 200-acre Skookum Complex of fires burning 9 miles south of Toketee in the Umpqua National Forest began Aug. 24. An incident management team is preparing to start management of the fire on Sunday.

The 245-acre Red Cone complex of fires is burning 10 miles north of the Crater Lake National Park headquarters. The fire, which began Aug. 20, is being managed by the U.S. Forest Service with a monitor/confine/contain strategy.

The 467-acre Little Butte fire burning on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest 16 miles northeast of Medford is now 95 percent contained. The fire was reported Monday and Oregon Department of Forestry provided initial attack resources. Fire is managed through a unified command of Rogue River-Siskiyou NF and ODF. Fire lines have been completed and firefighters are aggressively mopping-up to meet containment objectives, seeking to reach full containment by Sunday.

** EASTERN OREGON

The 2,000-acre Buffalo fire is burning 23 miles southeast of Christmas Valley on BLM Lakeview District grasslands. This lightning-caused fire is 60 percent contained

The 1,200-acre Garden fire is burning 18 miles northeast of Fort Rock. Lightning-caused fire burning in grasslands in the BLM Lakeview District. Fire is not contained.

Smoke forecast for this weekend - ODF Weather Office

WILDFIRE SMOKE FORECAST

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY WEATHER OFFICE
2:35 PM PDT FRI SEP 9 2011

AIR QUALITY:

Due to the various fire locations, a variety of wind patterns, and a stable atmosphere, wildfire smoke has been able to spread out over most of the state during the past few days. Virtually all of the state’s smoke monitoring equipment, operated by the DEQ and LRAPA, is showing elevated smoke levels. The highest readings this afternoon (Friday) were at locations near active fires in the northern Cascades and North-Central Oregon (Lyons, Government Camp, The Dalles), southwest Oregon (Shady Cove, Medford), and in northeastern Oregon (La Grande, Cove).

DEQ nephelometer readings (statewide) are available at: http://weather.smkmgt.com/tools/deq/map.htm

LRAPA nephelometer readings (Lane County) are available at: http://mdas.lrapa.org/DataSummary.aspx

SMOKE DISPERSION FORECAST:

Wildfire smoke dispersion depends on the stability of the atmosphere as well as wind direction and speed. A stable atmosphere holds smoke to the ground and an unstable atmosphere allows smoke to rise and dissipate. Smoke is typically mixed to higher altitudes during the afternoon, when daytime heating destabilizes the air mass. Conversely, smoke tends to settle near the ground and in drainages during the overnight and early morning hours.

Saturday: As the upper-level ridge of high pressure continues to build over the region, transport winds are forecast to turn more easterly across the state. That should further increase smoke levels across much of western Oregon and all areas west of active fires in general. The air mass will continue to stabilize, so the “dry” thunderstorm threat will be minimal. Warm air aloft will only allow for marginal daytime mixing of the air mass. Western Oregon smoke levels will likely peak Saturday night into early Sunday.

Sunday: The surface thermal trough is forecast to shift from the coast to over the western valleys Sunday morning. Winds will slacken and turn weakly southerly across most of the state. Smoke levels should peak along the I5 corridor, with smoke levels increasing again for areas to the north of active wildfires. The thermal trough is forecast to shift into Central Oregon Sunday afternoon. That will initiate a westerly transport flow into western Oregon, and begin to improve air quality along the I5 corridor. In contrast, an increasing westerly flow will deteriorate air quality for areas to the east of active fires in Central Oregon. Winds in eastern Oregon will become light with warm air aloft allowing for only marginal vertical mixing of smoke. Smoke from active fires in eastern Oregon could fan out in any direction.

Monday: The surface thermal trough will begin the day over Central Oregon; progressing into eastern Oregon in the afternoon. Increasing onshore flow should dramatically improve air quality across the interior valleys of western Oregon (assuming, of course, that no new wildfires pop up in the coast range). In contrast, areas east of active fires, in Central Oregon, may see an increase in smoke. Light transport winds are forecast for the eastern third of the state, with a tendency for a northwesterly component late in the day. That would likely mean an increase in smoke for areas to the southeast of active wildfires in northeastern Oregon.

This information is provided by the Oregon Department of Forestry Weather Office at the request of the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality.It is also on the web at: http://www.odf.state.or.us/DIVISIONS/protection/fire_protection/DAILY/wfsmoke.htm

No updates before Monday, September 12th.
For more information, contact DEQ’s Larry Calkins: 541-467-8297 or calkins.larry@deq.state.or.us

Pete Parsons
ODF Meteorologist

Friday, September 9, 2011

Red Flag Warning for SW Oregon on Saturday-Sunday

The National Weather Service in Medford has issued a Red Flag Warning for high wildfire potential covering Curry County, Josephine County, eastern Douglas County and portions of eastern Jackson County and the California border in effect from 11:00 Saturday morning until 11:00 Sunday night.

Hot temperatures will combine with wind gusts of 10 to 20 mph, and low relative humidity to form potentially explosive fire growth.

A Red Flag Warning is the highest fire forecast warning issued by the National Weather Service to warn of conditions that are ideal for wildland fire ignition and propagation. When humidity is very low, wildland fuels are extremely dry and when high winds are accompanied with multiple lightning strikes, the Red Flag Warning becomes a critical statement for firefighting agencies, which often alter their staffing and equipment resources dramatically to accommodate the forecast risk.

To the public, a Red Flag Warning means high fire danger with increased probability of a quickly spreading vegetation fire in the area within 24 hours. Please be very careful with fire and prevent accidental wildfire ignitions from sparks or open flame.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Most of Willamette Valley under high fire potential this weekend

Beginning Noon Friday, the National Weather Service in Portland issued Red Flag Warnings for high fire potential through those areas of the Willamette Valley not already under the Warning. Friday’s Red Flag covers all of Multnomah County, Columbia County, eastern Clatsop County, Washington County, Yamhill County, Clackamas County, Polk County, Marion County, Benton County and Lane County, and is in effect until 6pm Sunday.


The National Weather Service in Portland is continuing the Red Flag Warning for high fire potential in eastern Multnomah County, Clackamas County, Marion County, Linn County and eastern Lane County. The Red Flag Warning for these regions of Oregon is in effect until 6:00 Monday morning September 12.

The warning applies to all private and public lands (including the Tillamook State Forest and Clatsop State Forest) within Fire Zones OR 602-608.

Please exercise caution around open flame or spark-generated equipment.

A Red Flag Warning is the highest fire forecast warning issued by the National Weather Service to warn of conditions that are ideal for wildland fire ignition and propagation. When humidity is very low, wildland fuels are extremely dry and when high winds are accompanied with multiple lightning strikes, the Red Flag Warning becomes a critical statement for firefighting agencies, which often alter their staffing and equipment resources dramatically to accommodate the forecast risk.

To the public, a Red Flag Warning means high fire danger with increased probability of a quickly spreading vegetation fire in the area within 24 hours. Please be very careful with fire this week and prevent accidental wildfire ignitions from sparks or open flame.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Motorists avert possible Tillamook State Forest fire Thursday

Photo: Oregon State Police

Two quick-responding motorists are credited with stopping a car fire from turning into a forest fire in the Browns Camp vicinity of the Tillamook State Forest on Thursday night.


According to OSP Senior Trooper Mark McDougal, on September 8, 2011 at approximately 6:40 p.m. two separate motorists traveling along Highway 6 near milepost 34 saw smoke coming from down a nearby gravel logging road. The two men identified as KEVIN RANDLES, age 22, from Beaverton, and MITCHELL ESPINOZA, age 24, from Scappoose, drove up the road and spotted an abandoned vehicle on fire starting to spread into some brush and adjacent wood.

Using water and dirt, the two men worked together to extinguish the flames. Responding fire personnel from Banks Fire Department and Oregon Department of Forestry told McDougal that the two men probably averted a potential forest fire if the vehicle wasn't found and flames had continued to spread.

Oregon State Police (OSP) is asking for the public's help to identify the person(s) responsible for setting the vehicle fire. McDougal confirmed the vehicle is an abandoned stolen vehicle. Anyone with information regarding this investigation is asked to contact Senior Trooper McDougal at 503-647-7631 ext. 433.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Portland Metro area under burn ban

Reminder – burn bans are in effect for the Portland Metro area due to increased fire danger.


During Fire Season no open fires of any kind are allowed; including backyard, agricultural or open burning. This also includes recreational fires, camping fires, or backyard fire pit fires. Gas, briquette, or pellet type barbeques are still allowed but should be used with extreme caution, with extra care given to coal and embers. Generally, no open flame fires will be allowed.

Multnomah County

Due to extreme fire conditions the Multnomah County Fire Defense Board announces the official declaration of a Burn Ban effective September 8, 2011, at 8:00 a.m. Burn Bans are formally declared in Oregon on a County by County basis. This includes the Cities of Portland, Gresham, Fairview, Troutdale, Wood Village as well as Corbett, Sauvie Island and all unincorporated areas of Multnomah County. The burn ban will be in effect until further notice.

Washington County

Due to extreme fire conditions, the Washington County Fire Defense Board has implemented a burn ban effective immediately, September 9, 2011. The burn ban will be in effect until further notice. Following that decision, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue has also banned all outdoor open burning within its jurisdiction, including areas served in Multnomah and Clackamas County.

The Burn Ban includes the following situations:

1. Recreational burning, including cooking fires, and backyard fire pits.

2. Backyard burning

3. Agricultural burning

4. Land clearing or slash burning (not associated with Oregon Department of Forestry jurisdiction)

5. Ceremonial type fires.

Typically, burn bans allow some open burning. Because of dry conditions, high temperatures and winds TVF&R asks than no outdoor burning take place. In these extreme fire conditions, one spark can cause a catastrophic wildfire. Individuals found to be in violation of these requirements during the burn ban, may be held liable for the cost of extinguishment and for any property damage resulting from an illegal fire. The burn ban will remain in effect until cooler temperatures minimize the fire danger.

Clackamas County

Due to extreme fire conditions, the Clackamas County Fire Defense Board is implementing a burn ban (level E) as of 1:00 am, September 7th, 2011. The burn ban will be in effect until further notice. Details regarding this burn ban and what individuals can do to keep themselves and their neighbors safe will be released by or before 9:00 am, September 7th.

This burn ban was put into effect due to the extremely dry conditions, high temperatures, low humidity and winds that the area will be experiencing over the next week. During this burn ban no open fires of any kind are allowed, including recreational fires, camping fires or backyard fire pit fires. Basically, no open flame fires will be allowed until further notice. Gas barbecue’s or pellet-type barbecue’s are still allowed but should be used with extreme caution.

Anyone found to have an open fire during this burn ban will likely have it extinguished by their local fire department and could be issued a citation or warning for this violation.

Check out possible recreation closures for this weekend

Heading out for fun this weekend?


Fire danger is very high in western Oregon this weekend. Before you head out to your favorite recreation site in the forest, check ahead to find out if closure restrictions are in effect --

ODF Regulated Use Closures and IFPL Status

Private Forest Land closures in Oregon

Shadow Lake Fire Incident Information

Central Oregon Public Land closure information

Mt Hood National Forest / Dollar Lake fire closures

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Daily Fire Update for September 9, 2011

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS:


The 3,300-acre Cactus Mountain fire was reported Wednesday burning in grassland 17 miles northeast of Imnaha in Wallowa County. Though primarily on federal lands, 130 acres of the fire are under ODF protection. Five ODF engines and three crews have been assigned to the fire along with resource support from helicopters, one tender and one bulldozer. A portion of the fire is within the Hells Canyon Wilderness Area. Federal initial attack resources included engines, crews, helicopters and Grangeville (ID) smoke jumpers. Several structures are in the fire vicinity and potentially threatened. Cause of the fire is under investigation. Fire is 10 percent contained. An interagency incident management team assumed command of the fire Friday morning.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON:

** NORTH-CENTRAL OREGON

The 107,911-acre High Cascades Fire complex reported Aug. 24 burning along the Deschutes River is 80 percent contained. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is leading the suppression effort on the lightning-caused fire. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2546/

The 4,607-acre Dollar Lake Fire reported Aug. 27 burning 16 miles south of Hood River is 25 percent contained. The U.S. Forest Service is leading the suppression effort on the lightning-caused fire. An area of concern is the potential impact of the fire on the Bull Run watershed for the City of Portland. Drivers on Oregon Hwy 35 are cautioned to turn on their headlights, slow down, and watch for fire traffic. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2563

The 500-acre Mother Lode fire is burning 10 miles northwest of Detroit. A full perimeter has been established around the fire, reported on Aug. 26. The fire is not contained. An interagency incident management team assumed command of the fire Friday at 12:00 Noon.

The 6,700-acre Shadow Lake Fire reported Aug. 28 burning 15 miles west of Sisters is uncontained. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy. A new closure area is in effect – the closure now extends to the west along the southeast quadrant of Highways 20 and 126. This includes a portion of the McKenzie River Trail. Additional incident information is available on InciWeb: www.inciweb.org/incident/2550/

The 115-acre Substitute fire is burning in the Willamette National Forest 14 miles southeast of McKenzie Bridge. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fire with a monitor/confine/contain strategy.

** NORTHEAST OREGON

The 120-acre Chicken Hill fire is burning in timber off FR 5185 in the Wallowa Whitman NF northwest of Baker City. The lightning-caused fire is 40 percent contained.

The 252-acre Jim White Ridge Complex reported Aug. 3 is burning 10 miles east of Cove. The U.S. Forest Service is managing the fires with a monitor/confine/contain strategy.

** SOUTHERN OREGON

The 245-acre Red Cone complex of fires is burning 10 miles north of the Crater Lake National Park headquarters. The fire, which began Aug. 20, is being managed by the U.S. Forest Service with a monitor/confine/contain strategy.

The 467-acre Little Butte fire burning on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest 16 miles northeast of Medford is now 75 percent contained. The fire was reported Monday and Oregon Department of Forestry provided initial attack resources. Fire is managed through a unified command of Rogue River-Siskiyou NF and ODF. Fire lines have been completed and firefighters are aggressively mopping-up to meet containment objectives, seeking to reach full containment by Sunday.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Thursday, September 8, 2011

Red Flag Warning for southern Oregon Thursday

The National Weather Service in Medford has issued a Red Flag Warning for high wildfire potential covering eastern Douglas, Jackson County, southern Klamath County and Lake County in effect until 11:00 Thursday night.

Dry thunderstorms are expected through the region Thursday which are expected to provide lightning strikes. East winds of 10 to 20 mph are predicted, however in isolated instances, gusts of 50 mph are possible.

A Red Flag Warning is the highest fire forecast warning issued by the National Weather Service to warn of conditions that are ideal for wildland fire ignition and propagation. When humidity is very low, wildland fuels are extremely dry and when high winds are accompanied with multiple lightning strikes, the Red Flag Warning becomes a critical statement for firefighting agencies, which often alter their staffing and equipment resources dramatically to accommodate the forecast risk.

To the public, a Red Flag Warning means high fire danger with increased probability of a quickly spreading vegetation fire in the area within 24 hours. Please be very careful with fire this week and prevent accidental wildfire ignitions from sparks or open flame.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Red Flag Warning - eastern Multnomah south to Lane extended to Monday

The National Weather Service in Portland has extended the Red Flag Warning for high fire potential in eastern Multnomah County, Clackamas County, Marion County, Linn County and eastern Lane County. The Red Flag Warning for these regions of Oregon is in effect until 6:00 Monday morning September 12.


Wind gusts are forecast to increase on Friday, with some exposed areas of higher elevations sustaining gusts of 25 to 35 mph. Hot temperatures are forecast with relative humidity as low as 10 to 15 percent on ridges.

A Red Flag Warning is the highest fire forecast warning issued by the National Weather Service to warn of conditions that are ideal for wildland fire ignition and propagation. When humidity is very low, wildland fuels are extremely dry and when high winds are accompanied with multiple lightning strikes, the Red Flag Warning becomes a critical statement for firefighting agencies, which often alter their staffing and equipment resources dramatically to accommodate the forecast risk.

To the public, a Red Flag Warning means high fire danger with increased probability of a quickly spreading vegetation fire in the area within 24 hours. Please be very careful with fire this week and prevent accidental wildfire ignitions from sparks or open flame.

Kevin Weeks
Oregon Department of Forestry

Comments and questions

The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

Cool, wet weather in the winter of 2016-17 ended Oregon's long drought and left a thick snowpack at higher elevations which will take some time to melt. However, even in non-drought years Oregon's warm, dry summers create conditions that allow for fire to start and spread. In an average summer firefighters still see almost a thousand fires on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.



What we do

Protection jurisdiction

The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state- and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. There are about 30.4 million total acres of forest in Oregon.



Fire suppression policy

The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. While suppressing large fires can cost millions of dollars, economic and environmental damage from wildfires can be many times greater.




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About Me

My photo
Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers in Salem, Ore., maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.