All ODF fire protection districts are now in fire season. It's especially important in summer to avoid or be extra careful with any potential source of fire in wooded areas. Fire season means the end of most outdoor activities that are high risk for starting a fire, such as debris burning, campfires outside of designated areas, and using tracer ammunition and exploding targets.













Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Wildfire season ends statewide on Oct. 22

It's official: At midnight on Oct. 22 the last Oregon forest protection district went out of fire season, closing the 2012 season statewide. It was a long one. Eighty-plus consecutive days with no significant rainfall extended wildfire activity well into the fall. The last significant fire occurred on Oct. 18, a 16-acre blaze in the South Cascade District.

On the 16 million acres protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry, it was an average season. Just under 700 fires burned about 17,000 acres. The running 10-year average is 971 fires burning about 21,000 acres.

But 2012 saw plenty of fire on the rangelands of southcentral and southeastern Oregon. At 557,648 acres, the Long Draw Fire rewrote the record book, racing across the high desert to become the largest blaze in Oregon in more than a century. 

Nearly as big, the Holloway Fire burned 461,047 acres along the border with Nevada. The fire's perimeter included some 245,000 acres burned on the Oregon side. Other large range fires contributed to the total of 1.26 million acres burned on all jurisdictions in the state.

Oregon Department of Forestry firefighters, forest landowners and volunteers with the Rangeland Fire Protection Associations teamed with federal and rural fire departments to minimize the spread of these rangeland fires onto private forestlands.

Friday, October 19, 2012

ODF Fire Update, Friday, October 19, 2012

This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Fire Update for Friday, October 19, 2012. [Note: As fire season winds down across the state, Public Affairs will issue fire updates as needed, rather than daily, until fire season has ended on all ODF-protected forestlands.]


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
South Cascade District: The Hilltop Fire was reported at about 5 p.m. on Thursday evening, October 18, burning on ODF-protected lands in rolling terrain of grass and brush, six miles east of Lebanon. The fire burned approximately 16.5 acres, and was controlled and contained before the end of the evening. The area of the fire received a substantial rainfall over the past several hours, and is in monitoring status today. The cause of the fire is under investigation.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/, or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. Because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies commonly work closely together.

This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected land, and on the department's role as a partner in fighting major fires that start on land protected by other agencies.
FIRE INFORMATION
News media may contact the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office for fire information, (503) 945-7200, weekdays during business hours. After business hours and on weekends, media may obtain fire information by calling the Fire Duty Officer pager at 503-370-0403. The Fire Duty Officer will return media pages promptly.
 
Jeri Chase, Fire Information Officer 503-370-0403

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Ran ends fire season in parts of Oregon, but danger persists in others

The recent rains ended wildfire season in many ODF districts. But not enough fell east of the Cascades to reduce fire danger substantially there. Human-caused fires are still occurring. Please continue to exercise caution in the forest. And if you are planning to burn yard debris, be sure to check first with your local fire department or the nearest ODF office for rules and guidelines on open burning.

Until fire season ends on all ODF-protected forestlands, ODF Fire Duty Officers will be providing fire updates as needed/incidents occur, rather than providing regular, daily reports.

Jeri Chase, ODF Public Information Officer
Fire Duty Officer Pager # 503-370-0403

Monday, October 15, 2012

Daily fire update - 10-15-12


Weather change welcome, but not a season-ender
The arrival of rainfall over the weekend eased wildfire danger. But as this map shows - http://weather.smkmgt.com/tools/mesowest_maps/images/24hr_precip.htm - southwestern, central and eastern Oregon did not receive enough to end fire season. Human-caused fires are still occurring. We urge Oregonians to continue to exercise caution in the forest.

Fires on ODF-protected lands
No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF-protected lands were reported to the Salem Coordination Center during the past 24 hours.

Fires on other lands
No new fires were reported.

Other fire information
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center www.nwccweb.us/ - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38

About this update
This update focuses on fires on ODF-protected lands and fires on other jurisdictions in which ODF plays a significant support role. The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. Because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies work closely together.

Friday, October 12, 2012

Daily fire update - 10-12-12


Fire weather and fire prevention
The extended period of warm, dry weather that has kept firefighters busy may give way to more typical fall conditions this weekend, if the forecast for rain bears out. But for the present, fire danger remains high. An extended period of rain will be needed to substantially lower the risk. Please remain vigilant about fire safety.

Fires on ODF-protected lands
No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF-protected lands were reported to the Salem Coordination Center during the past 24 hours.

Fires on other lands
No new fires were reported.

Other fire information
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center www.nwccweb.us/ - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38

About this update
This update focuses on fires on ODF-protected lands and fires on other jurisdictions in which ODF plays a significant support role. The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. Because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies work closely together.

Thursday, October 11, 2012

Daily fire update - 10-11-12


Fire weather and fire prevention
The extended period of warm, dry weather that has kept firefighters busy may give way to more typical fall conditions this weekend, if the forecast for rain bears out. But for the present, fire danger remains high. An extended period of rain will be needed to substantially lower the risk. Human-caused fires are continuing to occur, so please remain vigilant about fire safety.

Fires on ODF-protected lands
No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF-protected lands were reported to the Salem Coordination Center during the past 24 hours.

Fires on other lands
No new fires were reported.

Other fire information
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center www.nwccweb.us/ - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38

About this update
This update focuses on fires on ODF-protected lands and fires on other jurisdictions in which ODF plays a significant support role. The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. Because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies work closely together.

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Daily fire update - 10-10-12


Fire weather and fire prevention
The extended period of warm, dry weather that has kept firefighters busy may give way to more typical fall conditions this weekend, if the forecast for rain bears out. But for the present, fire danger remains high. An extended period of rain will be needed to substantially lower the risk. Please remain vigilant about fire safety.

Outdoor debris burning remains prohibited in most areas throughout the state. Campfires, while only allowed in designated campgrounds, should not be built at all under the current conditions. In addition, motor vehicles are only allowed on improved roads that are free of flammable vegetation. For a complete list of restrictions in specific areas, log on to www.oregon.gov/ODF.

A few fire prevention tips for private forest landowners and operators:
1) Monitor weather conditions – such as humidity and wind – and consider earlier close-down of operations if the weather warrants it;
2) keep equipment in good working order and free from flammable debris, as well as parking it away from flammable material when shutting down for the day;
3) Fire Watches – stay on high alert; and
4) Be prepared by performing daily checks of fire suppression and communications equipment.

Fires on ODF-protected lands
No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF-protected lands were reported to the Salem Coordination Center during the past 24 hours.

Fires on other lands
No new fires were reported.

Other fire information
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center www.nwccweb.us/ - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38

About this update
This update focuses on fires on ODF-protected lands and fires on other jurisdictions in which ODF plays a significant support role. The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. Because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies work closely together.

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Daily fire update - 10-09-12


Fire weather and fire prevention
The extended period of warm, dry weather that has kept firefighters busy may give way to more typical fall conditions this weekend, if the forecast for rain bears out. But for the present, fire danger remains high. An extended period of rain will be needed to substantially lower the risk. Please remain vigilant about fire safety.

Outdoor debris burning remains prohibited in most areas throughout the state. Campfires, while only allowed in designated campgrounds, should not be built at all under the current conditions. In addition, motor vehicles are only allowed on improved roads that are free of flammable vegetation. For a complete list of restrictions in specific areas, log on to www.oregon.gov/ODF.

A few fire prevention tips for private forest landowners and operators:
1) Monitor weather conditions – such as humidity and wind – and consider earlier close-down of operations if the weather warrants it;
2) keep equipment in good working order and free from flammable debris, as well as parking it away from flammable material when shutting down for the day;
3) Fire Watches – stay on high alert; and
4) Be prepared by performing daily checks of fire suppression and communications equipment.

Fires on ODF-protected lands
No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF-protected lands were reported to the Salem Coordination Center during the past 24 hours.

Fires on other lands
The Pole Creek Fire, six miles southwest of Sisters in mature timber and down, bug-killed timber, is 26,795 acres, and 90 percent contained.

Residents are reminded that we are still in fire season and this fire is not fully contained. Due to hunters in the woods and continued dry conditions, new fire starts are a concern. If you are traveling in the forest, be aware of current fire restrictions and stay alert.

Other fire information
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center www.nwccweb.us/ - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38

About this update
This update focuses on fires on ODF-protected lands and fires on other jurisdictions in which ODF plays a significant support role. The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. Because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies work closely together.

Monday, October 8, 2012

Monday, October 8, 2012

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS


No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF-protected lands were reported to the Salem Coordination Center during the past 24 hours.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS

The Pole Creek Fire, six miles southwest of Sisters in mature timber and down, bug-killed timber, is 26,795 acres, and 85% contained. A special flight was conducted last night, which took infra-red pictures showing hot spots within the fire perimeter. A slight increase in burned acreage was discovered along the western edge of the fire in the Three Sisters Wilderness. The fire is burning towards natural barriers of rock. A Type IV Incident Management Team will assume command of the fire tomorrow.

Area closure: An area around the fire remains closed to public access during fire suppression activities. The closure area includes Forest Road 16 (Three Creek Lake), Forest Road 15 (Pole Creek Road), and a portion of the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail (PCNST). A reroute is in place for that portion of the PCNST that is closed. Please refer to the website: www.inciweb.org/incident/3244 , for further information.

Residents are reminded that we are still in fire season and this fire is not fully contained. Due to hunters in the woods and continued dry conditions, new fire starts are a concern. If you are traveling in the forest, be aware of current fire restrictions and stay alert.

Unless conditions change, this will be the last status report on this fire.

The lightning-caused Bald Mountain Fire, which started on September 18 and is burning in sub-alpine fir 12 miles southwest of Enterprise in the Eagle Cap Wilderness, has been mapped at 1,009 acres and is uncontained. Minimal fire behavior reported. Trail closures are in place and visitors are advised to contact the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, who is managing this fire, prior to entering the area.



Friday, October 5, 2012

Friday, October 5, 2012

Although autumn has arrived, weather conditions in Oregon are still creating high wildfire potential across the state.


FIRE WEATHER and FIRE PREVENTION

In Southern Oregon, there will be a slight cooling trend but high temps will remain above normal and the air mass will remain very dry. In NE Oregon forecast calls for very dry and locally breezy conditions both today and Saturday, especially along the east slopes of the Cascades and in the Columbia River Gorge. In NW Oregon there are red flag warnings in effect for most areas this afternoon.

Campfires are still a concern in many areas. Open fires, including campfires, remain prohibited on forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. On forestlands or in areas when campfires are allowed, they should be put completely out before leaving the campsite -- drown the fire with an abundance of water, stir and separate the hot coals, and drown again until all of the heat has been removed.
A few fire prevention tips for private forest landowners and operators:

1) Monitor weather conditions – such as humidity and wind – and consider earlier close-down of operations if the weather warrants it;

2) keep equipment in good working order and free from flammable debris, as well as parking it away from flammable material when shutting down for the day;

3) Fire Watches – stay on high alert; and

4) Be prepared by performing daily checks of fire suppression and communications equipment.
FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF-protected lands were reported to the Salem Coordination Center during the past 24 hours.
FIRES ON OTHER LANDS

The Pole Creek Fire, burning six miles southwest of Sisters in mature timber and down, bug-killed timber, is 26,510 acres, and 85% contained. The east side of the fire was relatively calm yesterday as crews have completed most of the fire suppression objectives. Very little smoke was observed near the fire perimeter. All of the planned fire line construction has been completed; crews will continue to patrol the area for the next few days. Along the northern edge of the fire, excess fire hose and equipment is being back-hauled to camp to return to Redmond Fire Cache. This area is in patrol status.

There may still be periods of time when smoke concentrations become uncomfortable. Those with respiratory issues may wish to consult the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality website for tips on smoke mitigation: http://www.deq.state.or.us/aqi/wildfire/index.htm

Residents are reminded that we are still in fire season and this fire is not contained. Due to hunters in the woods and continued dry conditions, new fire starts are a possibility and citizens should monitor available information sources and stay alert. The cause of the fire is under investigation. Full containment is expected by October 15. For more info: 541-549-6935.

The lightning-caused Bald Mountain Fire, which started on September 18 and is burning in sub-alpine fir 12 miles southwest of Enterprise in the Eagle Cap Wilderness, has been mapped at 1,009 acres and is uncontained. Minimal fire behavior reported last night. Trail closures are in place and visitors are advised to contact the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, who is managing this fire, prior to entering the area.



Thursday, October 4, 2012

Thursday, October 4, 2012

FIRE WEATHER and FIRE PREVENTION


There was a red flag warning in S. Oregon this morning for strong winds and low relative humidities. In NE Oregon dry northerly flow will persist through early next week which will result in locally breezy northeast winds and low relative humidity each afternoon. In NW Oregon there is a continuing red flag warning for dry east winds. These weather conditions in various areas of the state pose possible problems for any new potential fire ignitions that occur this week.

Campfires are still a concern in many areas. Open fires, including campfires, remain prohibited on forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. On forestlands or in areas when campfires are allowed, they should be put completely out before leaving the campsite -- drown the fire with an abundance of water, stir and separate the hot coals, and drown again until all of the heat has been removed.

A few fire prevention tips for private forest landowners and operators:

1) Monitor weather conditions – such as humidity and wind – and consider earlier close-down of operations if the weather warrants it;

2) keep equipment in good working order and free from flammable debris, as well as parking it away from flammable material when shutting down for the day;

3) Fire Watches – stay on high alert; and

4) Be prepared by performing daily checks of fire suppression and communications equipment.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF-protected lands were reported to the Salem Coordination Center during the past 24 hours.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS

The Pole Creek Fire, burning six miles southwest of Sisters, is 26,510 acres, and 85% contained. Most of the fire suppression work today will focus along the western fire edge in the Three Sisters Wilderness. Hand crews have been hiking up to five miles from trailheads to begin their fire line construction duties. Production will increase and exposure to difficult terrain and hazardous snags will be minimized when these hand crews are transported to their work site by helicopters in the morning and flown out in the evening; for some of the hand crews this plan will be implemented starting today.

Three helicopters are also available to cool down any newly-discovered hot spot or assist with any initial attack mission near Sisters outside of the fire area.

Residents are reminded that we are still in fire season and this fire is not contained. Due to an increae in hunters in the woods and continued dry conditions, new fire starts are a possibility and citizens should monitor available information sources and stay alert. The cause of the fire is under investigation. Full containment is expected by October 15. For more info: 541-549-6935.

The lightning-caused Bald Mountain Fire, which started on September 18 and is burning in sub-alpine fir 12 miles southwest of Enterprise in the Eagle Cap Wilderness, has been mapped at 1,009 acres and is uncontained. Minimal fire behavior reported last night. Trail closures are in place and visitors are advised to contact the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, who is managing this fire, prior to entering the area.

Wednesday, October 3, 2012

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF-protected lands were reported to the Salem Coordination Center during the past 24 hours.

However, The Buckaroo Creek Fire was reported at 8 p.m. on Tuesday burning 15 miles SE of Pendleton on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (ODF protects those lands) in timber, brush and grass. Strong winds pushed the fire but ODF-Pendleton Unit, CTUIR and BIA firefighters were able to get a line around it at 8.5 acres.
Three ODF fire engines, four CTUIR engines and one BIA engine responded to the fire. Today an Oregon Youth Authority 10-person crew, five engines and a water tender are conducting mop-up. Cause is under investigation.

ODF The Dalles Unit -- The Milepost 66 fire burning in grass, oak and conifer 2 miles east of Hood River reached full containment on Thursday. The fire, now mapped at 60 acres, has solid containment boundaries around it and is currently 70 percent controlled.
Yesterday, management of the fire was turned over to the Forest Service who will continue to mop up, patrol and rehab as needed. Cause of the fire remains under investigation. For more information: David Jacob – (541) 296-4626

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS
Fire crews made progress yesterday on the Pole Creek Fire, burning six miles southwest of Sisters, and constructed additional fire lines in the northwest corner of the fire.  A heavy-lift helicopter was added to support fire fighters cool down hot spots throughout the fire area.  Together with a medium lift capacity helicopter, both ships worked very effectively as a team in support of on-the-ground efforts to contain the fire.  The fire size is 26,510 acres, and is 85% contained. Fire crews are continuing to hold and mop up along all perimeters of the fire. The cause of the fire is under investigation.

Temperatures today are expected to be much lower with the added benefit of an increase in the relative humidity (the amount of moisture in the air).  Fire managers will take advantage of this weather pattern and plan to continue with fire line construction and mop-up operations to meet containment objectives by October 15.  Smoke will continue to be produced from this fire and depending on the wind direction and speed, some communities and areas may be impacted with various amounts of smoke.  Those with respiratory issues may wish to consult the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality website for tips on smoke mitigation, http://www.deq.state.or.us/aqi/wildfire/index.htm.

Information on this fire can be found in various places including Facebook, Twitter and Inciweb (www.inciweb/incidents/3244>).  All of these information sites will be updated as conditions change. 
Residents are reminded that we are still in fire season and this fire is not contained.  Due to an increase in hunters in the woods and the continued dry conditions, new fire starts are a possibility and citizens should monitor available information sources and stay alert.
Check
www.firewise.org> for tips and techniques to help protect your home from future wildfires.

The lightning-caused Bald Mountain Fire, which started on September 18 and is burning in sub-alpine fir 12 miles southwest of Enterprise in the Eagle Cap Wilderness, has been mapped at 1,009 acres and is uncontained.  Minimal fire behavior reported last night. Trail closures are in place and visitors are advised to contact the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, who is managing this fire, prior to entering the area.

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Fire Update for Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Despite entering October and autumn being underway, weather conditions in Oregon are still creating high wildfire potential across the state.


FIRE WEATHER and FIRE PREVENTION

A dry cold front pushed across the region earlier this morning. This will bring a cooler but very dry air mass into the Southern Oregon area. A red flag warning is in effect for north central Oregon west of Pendleton this afternoon; breezy to windy conditions are expected as northerly winds increase during the day and into the evening. These weather conditions in various areas of the state pose possible problems for any new potential fire ignitions that occur this week.

Campfires are still a concern in many areas. Open fires, including campfires, remain prohibited on forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. On forestlands or in areas when campfires are allowed, they should be put completely out before leaving the campsite -- drown the fire with an abundance of water, stir and separate the hot coals, and drown again until all of the heat has been removed.

A few fire prevention tips for private forest landowners and operators:

1) Monitor weather conditions – such as humidity and wind – and consider earlier close-down of operations if the weather warrants it;

2) keep equipment in good working order and free from flammable debris, as well as parking it away from flammable material when shutting down for the day;

3) Fire Watches – stay on high alert; and

4) Be prepared by performing daily checks of fire suppression and communications equipment.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF-protected lands were reported to the Salem Coordination Center during the past 24 hours.

ODF The Dalles Unit -- The Milepost 66 fire burning 2 miles east of Hood River reached full containment on Thursday. The fire, now mapped at 60 acres, has solid containment boundaries around it and is currently 70 percent controlled.

Today, crews with Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area and ODF, respectively, will continue to mop up, patrol and rehab as needed. Cause of the fire remains under investigation. For more information: David Jacob – (541) 296-4626


FIRES ON OTHER LANDS

The Pole Creek Fire, burning six miles southwest of Sisters, is 26,510 acres and 85 percent contained. Fire crews are continuing to hold and mop up along all perimeters of the fire. The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office has removed the Level 2 Pre-cautionary Notice for all Sister’s area residents.

For additional fire information and closure updates contact 541-549-6935, or see Inciweb at: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/3244/

The Bald Mountain Fire, which started on September 18 and is burning 12 miles southwest of Enterprise in the Eagle Cap Wilderness, has been mapped at 1,009 acres and is uncontained. Trail closures are in place and visitors are advised to contact the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, who is managing this fire, prior to entering the area.



Monday, October 1, 2012

Red Flag Warning for northern Columbia Basin

The National Weather Service in Pendleton on Monday issued a Red Flag Warning for the northern Oregon Columbia Basin in effect from Noon to 11:00pm Tuesday. High wind gusts with very low relative humidity are forecast, creating increased potential for wildfire ignition and growth.


The Warning covers Oregon Zone 631 – generally, the northern areas of Sherman, Gilliam, Morrow and Umatilla Counties. The strongest winds are anticipated on Tuesday afternoon, with gusts of up to 30 mph expected in some areas.

A Red Flag Warning is the highest fire forecast warning issued by the National Weather Service to warn of conditions that are ideal for wildland fire ignition and propagation. To the public, a Red Flag Warning means high fire danger with increased probability of a quickly spreading wildland fire in the area within the next 24 hours.

Kevin Weeks – ODF Public Affairs Office

Campfires still a problem on forest lands



It’s what keeps foresters awake at night. Somewhere right now, in the almost 30.5 million acres of Oregon forestland, someone has just walked away and abandoned a campfire – even in an area where open campfires are prohibited due to wildfire danger.

“It doesn’t take much to spark a fire this time of year,” says Oregon Department of Forestry’s Fire Prevention Coordinator, Tom Fields. “We’ve been very fortunate so far considering we’ve gone an entire summer with little to no precipitation. Now is not the time to let our guard down and ruin an otherwise successful season.”

Drought conditions across much of the region this summer have sapped trees, shrubs and grasses of moisture, creating a fuel bed primed to burn. It will take more than morning dew or even a brief rain shower to reduce the wildfire hazard.

ODF operates fire patrols daily during the height of fire season, checking designated or informal camp sites to make sure fires are not left unattended. This weekend, ODF crews across northwest Oregon found three abandoned or illegal campfires in the Forest Grove District, one burning in the Astoria District and two campfires – including one that sparked a 20 foot by 20 foot spot fire – burning in the Tiilamook District.

“While we were totaling up the weekend figures,” said Don Everingham, assistant to the Area Director for ODF’s NW Oregon region, “we had reports come in of abandoned campfires that two districts detected on Monday morning and put out.”

ODF’s Southern Oregon Area patrol crews detected 5 campfires that resulted in two small fires over the weekend. The ODF Eastern Oregon Area patrols detected 11 unattended or illegal campfires throughout their region. Illegal campfires, when detected by ODF, are put out and the potential exists for persons found responsible for the campfire to be cited.

First, find out if campfires are allowed in the forest area you plan to camp. Currently, campfires remain prohibited on the 16 million acres of land under ODF protection. When campfires are allowed, they should be monitored at all times; even if a fire is sited and built properly, leaving it unattended even for a few minutes can allow a spark to ignite nearby vegetation. The parched conditions in the forest have left grass, shrubs and trees vulnerable to burn.

When you leave the campsite, put the fire completely out before leaving. To do so, drown the fire with an abundance of water, stir and separate the hot coals, and drown again until all of the heat has been removed.

Fields adds that even if campfires are allowed -- this is not a good time to have one. “We can’t afford to have a careless fire now,” he said.

For additional information and helpful tips on campfire safety, consult the Keep Oregon Green website, www.keeporegongreen.org

Kevin Weeks – ODF Public Affairs Office

Fire danger remains High this week in Oregon



Though the calendar has rolled into October, Oregon is still very much in wildland fire season, with some regions of the state experiencing relative humidity and tree moisture levels at, or near, historic low points.

It is important to stress that the event which draws forest fire season to a close – several days of sustained rainfall throughout the state – is not in the weather forecast for the near future.

High winds are predicted later this week for NW Oregon and the northern Cascade region of the state, prompting several ODF fire protection districts in the northern end of the state to increase readiness, and remind members of the public about fire danger. A dry cold front is expected across Oregon later Monday and into Tuesday; rain is not expected with this weather system but strong winds and cool dry air are forecast, posing potential problems for existing fires and any new potential fire ignitions that occur this week.

For commercial operators on the western side of Oregon, many private and state forest protection zones are entering IFPL Level 3 conditions this week. For updated conditions check the ODF web site: http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/pages/FIRE/precautionlevel.aspx

Open fires, including campfires, are prohibited on all lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry, about 16 million acres of private, county, state and Bureau of Land Management (west of the Cascades) forestland. Campfires may be allowed in some designated areas and travelers should check with their local forestry or protection association office for details.

On forestlands or in areas when campfires are allowed, they should be put completely out before leaving the campsite -- drown the fire with an abundance of water, stir and separate the hot coals, and drown again until all of the heat has been removed.

Kevin Weeks - ODF Public Affairs Office

Morning update - October 1, 2012


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS


No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF-protected lands were reported to the Salem Coordination Center during the past 24 hours.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS

The Pole Creek Fire, burning six miles southwest of Sisters, is 26,510 acres and 85 percent contained. Additional fire starts within wilderness areas were detected Sunday; Two Hotshot crews arrived yesterday to begin a direct attack strategy today on the northwest corner of the fire, joining 410 fire fighters remaining on scene. Full containment is expected by October 15. The incident management team transitioned this fire back to local officials Saturday. All major highway routes remain open to Sisters and other central Oregon communities. More information on this fire is available on Inciweb at: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/3244/

For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us / - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38

Kevin Weeks - ODF Public Affairs Office

Fire Restrictions in NE Oregon update



As of Thursday the 27th, the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest moved to Phase A of the Public Use Restrictions for federal forestlands in NE Oregon. Due to cooler nights and better humidity recovery in the evenings, light fuels such as grasses have reduced fire danger; especially early in the day. Heavy fuels, limbs and logs, remain extremely dry and by the middle of the afternoon all fuels have dried and returned to a high fire danger level.

All partners in Oregon forest fire safety – the U.S. Forest Service, BLM, local fire districts and Oregon Department of Forestry officials urge the public to be engaged-conscious, cautious and careful with fire.

Kent Connaughton, Regional Forester for the Pacific Northwest Region of the U.S. Forest Service added: “In an active fire season, we need our firefighters available and ready to respond. Every fire that’s prevented helps firefighters remain available, rested, and safe. As always, our highest priority remains public and firefighter safety.”

Under Phase A of the Public Use Restrictions chainsaw use is permitted for firewood by the public. However, campfires are still limited to developed recreational sites. For a complete list of regulations and developed recreation sites on the Wallowa-Whitman, please visit the Forest Orders webpage at http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/wallowa-whitman/alerts-notices/?cid=stelprdb5228794

Private lands protected by Oregon Department of Forestry remain under a regulated closure which prohibits:

• Open fires, including camp fires, charcoal fires, cooking fires and warming fires except at designated locations.

• Use of motor vehicles, including motorcycles and all terrain vehicles (ATVs), is prohibited except on improved roads.

• Non-industrial chainsaw use and fire wood cutting.

On September 25th, the Wallowa-Whitman changed from Industrial Fire Precaution Level (IFPL) 4 to IFPL 3 for commercial forest operations. A complete description of the change can be found at http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail.wallowa-whitman/home/?cid=stelprdb5228793

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Jamie Knight, ODF LaGrande Unit
Matthew Burks, Wallowa-Whitman National Forest

Sunday, September 30, 2012

Scoggins Valley Road fire is contained


The Scoggins Valley Road fire is contained on Sunday afternoon. Fire size is now estimated at 0.3 acres and crews have established a hose line surrounding the fire. Landowner fire resources have been released, and just two 10-person crews from South Fork are working the fire.

Kevin Weeks - ODF Public Affairs

Scoggins Valley Road fire west of Forest Grove


Oregon Department of Forestry resources based in Forest Grove are battling a fire several miles west of Henry Hagg Lake. The Scoggins Valley Road fire was reported just after Noon Sunday burning in forestland south of Saddle Mountain. The fire at 3 p.m. is estimated at about 3.5 acres and is 75 percent contained. Cause of the fire is under investigation

ODF dispatched 4 engines to the fire, 3 engines owned by the forest landowner are assisting along with a water tender provided by Gaston Rural Fire Department to assist suppression efforts. Three 10-person crews from the South Fork Forest Camp are being mobilized to assist efforts are the fire scene.

Please be safe if you are venturing into the forests this weekend, for recreation or the opening of several hunting seasons. Open fires, including campfires, remain prohibited on forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.  On forestlands or in areas when campfires are allowed, they should be put completely out before leaving the campsite -- drown the fire with an abundance of water, stir and separate the hot coals, and drown again until all of the heat has been removed.
Kevin Weeks – ODF Public Affairs Office

Milepost 66 fire - Sunday update


The Milepost 66 fire, burning two miles east of Hood River, was contained on Thursday afternoon; however extensive work remains to bring the fire fully under control.

The fire, now mapped at 60 acres, has solid containment boundaries around it, but is currently 50 percent controlled. Sunday, fire crews continue to perform mop-up work within the fire lines to eliminate hot spots and areas that continue to smolder.

The fire will continue to affect air quality in Hood River and the Columbia Gorge for several more days. On Monday, the multi-agency team fighting the fire, including ODF-US Forest Service-multiple local fire districts, will begin to transition this fire back to local districts and reduce the number of fire fighters on scene. Cause of the fire remains under investigation.

Kevin Weeks - ODF Public Affairs Office

Saturday, September 29, 2012

Morning update - September 29, 2012


ODF The Dalles Unit -- The Milepost 66 fire burning 2 miles east of Hood River reached full containment on Thursday afternoon. The 70-acre fire crosses several ownership types, and resources from ODF, the U.S. Forest Service, and multiple local fire districts are assigned to the fire.

ODF South Cascade District –
the Buck Mountain fire NE of Eugene was fully contained on Friday afternoon. Size of the fire was 18 acres, cause of the fire remains under investigation. No structures were threatened during the fire and no injuries were reported.
FIRES ON OTHER LANDS

The Pole Creek Fire, burning six miles southwest of Sisters, is 26,285 acres and 85 percent contained. Full containment is expected by October 15. Management of the fire has been returned to local officials. All major highway routes remain open to Sisters and other central Oregon communities. More information on this fire is available on Inciweb at: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/3244

The Bald Mountain Fire, which started on September 18 and is burning 12 miles southwest of Enterprise in the Eagle Cap Wilderness, has been mapped at 1,009 acres and is uncontained. Trail closures are in place and visitors are advised to contact the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, who is managing this fire, prior to entering the area.

The Rooper fire burning three miles north of Antelope on Prineville District BLM lands was reported Tuesday afternoon. The fire in grass and brush is 660 acres and 90 percent contained.

For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us  - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38

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Weather outlook


From the National Weather Service offices in Oregon -- Dry weather is forecast throughout the weekend for Oregon. East of the Cascades expect increasing westerly winds, mainly in the wind prone areas like the Columbia River Gorge.  Wind speeds and relative humidity are not forecast to reach a critical combination. Warm and drier conditions will develop Sunday across the state. Weak offshore winds will build Sunday and Monday across the top of the Oregon Cascades, bringing stronger winds into eastern Oregon. Fire danger indicators will rise on Sunday and Monday. A cold front Monday night and Tuesday will bring gusty east winds to Oregon without rain.
Kevin Weeks - ODF Public Affairs Office

Buck Mountain fire is contained



Through aggressive attack Friday, the Buck Mountain fire NE of Eugene was fully contained on Friday afternoon. Size of the fire was 18 acres, cause of the fire remains under investigation. No structures were threatened during the fire and no injuries were reported.

A reminder for the weekend – Hot, dry conditions are forecast for several areas of Oregon, including high winds on the eastern slopes of the Cascades and Columbia Gorge. Thunderstorms which may produce lightning are also predicted for NE Oregon.

Please be safe if you are venturing into the forests this weekend, for recreation or the opening of several hunting seasons. Open fires, including campfires, remain prohibited on forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. On forestlands or in areas when campfires are allowed, they should be put completely out before leaving the campsite -- drown the fire with an abundance of water, stir and separate the hot coals, and drown again until all of the heat has been removed.

Kevin Weeks – ODF Public Affairs Office

Friday, September 28, 2012

Buck Mountain update - and a safety reminder


Firefighters are continuing work on controlling the Buck Mountain fire near Eugene in the Coburg Hills. ODF has pulled in resources from the Western Lane District and Douglas Forest Protective Association today to get the upper hand on the 18 acre fire, reported Thursday night about 8:15.


A bulldozer-cut line around the fire has been established. Three 20-person crews are working the fire this afternoon. Cause of the fire is under investigation.

ODF Eastern Lane District dispatched 8 engines to the fire with a bulldozer and water tender last night. Several rural districts provided assistance on the fire.

A reminder for the weekend – Hot, dry conditions are forecast for several areas of Oregon, including high winds on the eastern slopes of the Cascades and Columbia Gorge. Thunderstorms which may produce lightning are also predicted for NE Oregon.

Please be safe if you are venturing into the forests this weekend, for recreation or the opening of several hunting seasons. Open fires, including campfires, remain prohibited on forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. On forestlands or in areas when campfires are allowed, they should be put completely out before leaving the campsite -- drown the fire with an abundance of water, stir and separate the hot coals, and drown again until all of the heat has been removed.

Kevin Weeks – ODF Public Affairs Office

Morning update - September 28, 2012

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS


ODF The Dalles Unit -- The Milepost 66 fire burning 2 miles east of Hood River reached full containment on Thursday afternoon. The 70-acre fire crosses several ownership types, and resources from ODF, the U.S. Forest Service, and multiple local fire districts are assigned to the fire. The fire is burning along the Mark Hatfield trail between Hood River and Mosier; the trail is closed during the fire response. Cause of the fire is under investigation.

Crews on Friday are performing mop-up within the fire boundaries, and two helicopters continue to perform water drops on the fire. Motorists on Interstate 84 east of Hood River are urged to use caution in the area due to fire vehicle traffic and the visual distraction of helicopters dipping bucket loads of water close to the highway.

ODF firefighters also responded to two small fires south of Mosier Thursday afternoon, both were kept at below one acre each.

ODF South Cascade District – the Buck Mountain fire was reported Thursday night about 8:15pm burning in replanted forestland NE of Eugene in the Coburg Hills. The fire is estimated at 18 acres on Friday morning; crews made progress on the fire overnight, and have been able to establish a bulldozer line around the fire to slow its growth. Cause of the fire is under investigation.

South Cascade District dispatched 5 engines to the fire, two crews, a bulldozer and 3 water tenders. Several rural districts provided assistance on the fire. On Friday, additional personnel and equipment from ODF’s Western Lane District and Douglas Forest Protective Association will assist the incident response.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS

The Pole Creek Fire, burning six miles southwest of Sisters, is 26,285 acres and 85 percent contained. Full containment is expected by October 15. Deschutes County officials have lifted the Level 2 pre-evacuation alert for residents in the Crossroads and Edgington/Remuda areas. 600 fire personnel are working this incident, which is anticipated to begin a transition back to local district management on Saturday. All major highway routes remain open to Sisters and other central Oregon communities. More information on this fire is available on Inciweb at: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/3244/

The Bald Mountain Fire, which started on September 18 and is burning 12 miles southwest of Enterprise in the Eagle Cap Wilderness, has been mapped at 1,009 acres and is uncontained. Trail closures are in place and visitors are advised to contact the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, who is managing this fire, prior to entering the area.

The Rooper fire burning three miles north of Antelope on Prineville District BLM lands was reported Tuesday afternoon. The fire in grass and brush is 660 acres and 90 percent contained.

For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us  - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38

Kevin Weeks - ODF Public Affairs Office

Buck Mountain fire north of Eugene


Buck Mountain fire scene Thursday night - Greg Wagenblast / ODF photo

ODF personnel responded to the Buck Mountain fire east of Interstate 5 and northeast of Eugene on Thursday night. The fire burning in replanted forestland was reported about 8:15 p.m. NE of the McGowan Road Overlook, and Friday morning is estimated at 18 acres. Continues to be an active fire scene that crews hope to make progress on Friday – last night, a bulldozer line was constructed around the fire to slow its growth. Cause of the fire is under investigation.


ODF South Cascade District dispatched 8 engines to the fire with a bulldozer and water tender. Crews were hoping to keep the fire size small late Thursday night through aggressive initial attack. Several rural districts provided assistance on the fire. On Friday, additional personnel and equipment from ODF’s Western Lane District and Douglas Forest Protective Association will assist the incident response.

Even as we move into autumn, fire danger is still very high throughout much of the state. Please be safe with fire when around grasslands and forests, and if you are travelling for recreations this weekend please call ahead to local areas for updated fire closure restrictions.

Kevin Weeks – ODF Public Affairs Office

Fire east of Coburg visible from Interstate 5


ODF personnel responded to a fire east of Interstate 5 and northeast of Eugene on Thursday night. The fire burning in replanted forestland was reported about 8:15 p.m. NE of the McGowan Road Overlook. Preliminary estimates placed the fire size at about 6 acres on Thursday night. The fire was very visible from Interstate 5, causing additional public interest and concern.


ODF South Cascade District dispatched 8 engines to the fire with a bulldozer and water tender. Crews were hoping to keep the fire size small late Thursday night through aggressive initial attack. Mohawk RFD and other districts provided assistance on the fire. Cause of the fire is under investigation.

Even as we move into autumn, fire danger is still very high throughout much of the state. Please be safe with fire when around grasslands and forests, and if you are travelling for recreations this weekend please call ahead to local areas for updated fire closure restrictions.

Kevin Weeks – ODF Public Affairs Office

Thursday, September 27, 2012

Central Oregon hunter info booths for Friday

Fire danger remains high in central Oregon. In an effort to prevent human-caused fires during hunting season, wildland fire officials will host Hunter Information Booths across Central Oregon Wednesday, Sept. 26 to Friday, Sept. 28. (See below for location and times). Current fire restriction information will be provided to the public regarding open fires, off-road driving, chainsaw use, smoking in the forest, and more. Maps will be available for sale and road closure information will also be available. Coffee will also be available at most locations.


Hunter Booth Locations on Friday:

Prineville - at Ray's on the East side of Prineville off Highway 26 from 5:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Sisters- at Ray's West end of Sisters on HWY 20 from 6 a.m.- 6 p.m.

La Pine - at Ray's located on Hwy 97 South from 6 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Walker Range/Crescent-Highway 58 - On Highway 58 at mile post 71 10 a.m. - 7 p.m.

The Dalles - Memaloose Rest Area on I84 6 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

The Dalles - Dodson Road  9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Mt. Vernon- Hwy 26 6 a.m.- 6 p.m.
The hunter booths are brought to you by the Central Oregon Fire Prevention Cooperative, the Klamath County Fire Prevention Cooperative the Mid-Columbia Fire Prevention Cooperative and the Grant-Harney Fire Prevention Co-op.

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Hood River MP 66 fire is now contained




Hood River, OR – Aided by calm winds, firefighters completed a line around the Milepost 66 fire Thursday afternoon, containing a highly visible blaze along Interstate 84 that began Tuesday night.

The fire, two miles east of Hood River, was contained at approximately 70 acres by about 120 firefighters and two helicopters Thursday. The fire had grown little overnight. The lack of customary Gorge winds was a big help in containing the hillside fire.The cause of the fire remains under investigation.

Meanwhile, firefighters responded to two small fires south of Mosier Thursday afternoon. Called the Elder Road fires, one was a quarter-acre in size; the other about three-quarters. Oregon Dept. of Forestry, aided by firefighters from the National Scenic Area, a National Park Service engine and a helicopter, fought the two blazes. Both fires are under investigation.

Another one-acre fire Thursday near the High Bridge on the Wind River in Washington was picked up by crews from the Larch Mountain Honor Camp, the Dept. of Natural Resources and local fire departments. The Wind River fire caused two homes to be temporarily evacuated. It is also under investigation.

The Mark O. Hatfield Trail from Hood River to Mosier remains closed. No structures are threatened. Interstate 84 remains open, though one of the east-bound lanes is closed at milepost 66, just east of Hood River.

The fire crosses several ownership types, and resources from Oregon Department of Forestry, the U.S. Forest Service, and multiple local fire districts are assigned to the fire.

Crews and airships will be back at work in the morning after monitoring the fire overnight.

# # #


Erin Black
Public Affairs Staff Officer
Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area

Morning update - September 27, 2012


ODF The Dalles Unit -- The Milepost 66 fire burning 2 miles east of Hood River has covered 70 acres and is 15 percent contained on Thursday morning. Lack of strong winds assisted the 110 fire personnel working the fire, and efforts are being focused Thursday on the southern side of the fire. Boundaries have been established on the west and east sides of the fire. Two helicopters are assisting with air support.

The eastbound lanes of Interstate 84 have fully reopened, but motorists are urged to use caution in the area due to fire vehicle traffic and the visual distraction of helicopters dipping bucket loads of water close to the highway.

The fire crosses several ownership types, and resources from ODF, the U.S. Forest Service, and multiple local fire districts are assigned to the fire. The fire is burning along the Mark Hatfield trail between Hood River and Mosier; the trail is closed during the fire response. Cause of the fire is under investigation.

ODF Grants Pass Unit -- The 26-acre Grave Creek fire in Josephine County 11 miles southwest of Glendale was 95 percent contained by Wednesday afternoon and fire managers anticipate the fire being fully contained today. Fire began Sunday evening, cause of which remains under investigation.

ODF Grants Pass Unit – The 32-acre Rancheria fire reported Sunday is now fully contained. Fifty fire personnel are working mop up on the fire Thursday.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS

The Pole Creek Fire, burning six miles southwest of Sisters, is 26,285 acres and 80 percent contained. Deschutes County officials have lifted the Level 2 pre-evacuation alert for residents in the Crossroads and Edgington/Remuda areas. More information on this fire is available on Inciweb at: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/3244

The Bald Mountain Fire, which started on September 18 and is burning 12 miles southwest of Enterprise in the Eagle Cap Wilderness, has been mapped at just over 1,000 acres and is uncontained. Trail closures are in place and visitors are advised to contact the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, who is managing this fire, prior to entering the area.

The Rooper fire burning three miles north of Antelope on Prineville District BLM lands was reported Tuesday afternoon. The fire in grass and brush is 600 acres and 10 percent contained. No further growth of the fire is anticipated.
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/  - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38

Kevin Weeks - ODF Public Affairs Office

Hunter information booths for Thursday

Fire danger remains high in central Oregon. In an effort to prevent human-caused fires during hunting season, wildland fire officials will host Hunter Information Booths across Central Oregon Wednesday, Sept. 26 to Friday, Sept. 28. (See below for location and times). Current fire restriction information will be provided to the public regarding open fires, off-road driving, chainsaw use, smoking in the forest, and more. Maps will be available for sale and road closure information will also be available. Coffee will also be available at most locations.


Hunter Booth Locations for Thursday September 27:

Prineville - at Ray's on the East side of Prineville off Highway 26 from 5:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Sisters- at Ray's West end of Sisters on Highway 20 from 6 a.m.- 6 p.m.

La Pine - at Ray's located on Hwy 97 South from 6 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Walker Range/Crescent - Highway 58 at mile post 71 from 10 a.m. - 7 p.m.

The Dalles - Memaloose Rest Area on I84 from 6 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

The Dalles - Dodson Road from 9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Mt. Vernon- Hwy 26 from 6 a.m.- 6 p.m.

The hunter booths are brought to you by the Central Oregon Fire Prevention Cooperative, the Klamath County Fire Prevention Cooperative the Mid-Columbia Fire Prevention Cooperative and the Grant-Harney Fire Prevention Co-op.

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Milepost 66 fire update; I-84 back to normal

The Milepost 66 fire east of Hood River is 70 acres in size and 5 percent contained as of Wednesday night.


Traffic has resumed normal operations with eastbound Interstate 84 having both lanes open. Motorists are advised to watch for fire vehicles in the area.

Heavy smoke is present in the Hood River area. The fire, reported Tuesday night, is burning along the Mark Hatfield trail between Hood River and Mosier; the trail is closed during the fire response. Cause of the fire is under investigation

Kevin Weeks - ODF Public Affairs Office

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Hunter information booths - Wednesday locations


Fire danger remains high in central Oregon. In an effort to prevent human-caused fires during hunting season, wildland fire officials will host Hunter Information Booths across Central Oregon Wednesday, Sept. 26 to Friday, Sept. 28. (See below for location and times). Current fire restriction information will be provided to the public regarding open fires, off-road driving, chainsaw use, smoking in the forest, and more. Maps will be available for sale and road closure information will also be available. Coffee will also be available at most locations.


Hunter Booth Locations for Wednesday, September 26:

Prineville - at Ray's on the East side of Prineville off Highway 26 from 5:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Mt. Vernon - Highway 26 from 6 a.m.- 6 p.m.

The hunter booths are brought to you by the Central Oregon Fire Prevention Cooperative, the Klamath County Fire Prevention Cooperative the Mid-Columbia Fire Prevention Cooperative and the Grant-Harney Fire Prevention Co-op.

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Morning update - September 26, 2012


ODF The Dalles Unit -- The Milepost 66 fire in the Columbia Gorge, burning 2 miles east of Hood River, is estimated Wednesday morning at 50 acres. Fire crews provided attack on the fire burning in steep terrain throughout the night after the fire was reported just after 8:00pm Tuesday. The fire is burning along the Mark Hatfield trail between Hood River and Mosier; the trail is closed during the fire response. Cause of the fire is under investigation.


The fire crosses several ownership types, and resources from ODF, the U.S. Forest Service, multiple fire districts including Wy’East Fire District and Westside FD are assigned to the fire. An estimated 30 fire personnel from all responding agencies worked the fire Tuesday night. Mutual aid is being provided from a Washington DNR fire engine. Wednesday, 4 ODF engines are working the fire and an ODF helicopter has been ordered for air attack on the fire.

ODOT advises that one eastbound lane of Interstate 84 is blocked between MP 66 and 67 due to fire activity. Motorists are advised to be prepared for slowdowns.

ODF Grants Pass Unit -- The Grave Creek fire in Josephine County burning 11 miles southwest of Glendale is 26 acres in size and 80 percent contained. The Oregon Department of Forestry, United States Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, Rogue River Fire District, Douglas Forest Protective Association, Douglas County and DOC Shutter Creek inmates are among the 60 fire personnel assigned to the fire. Fire began Sunday evening, cause of which remains under investigation.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON

The Pole Creek Fire, burning six miles southwest of Sisters, is 26,285 acres and 75 percent contained. A community fire information update is planned for tonight at 7:30 P.M. at the Sisters Elementary School. Residents in the Crossroads and Edgington/Remuda areas remain under a Level 2, pre-evacuation alert. More information on this fire is available on Inciweb at: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/3244

The Bald Mountain Fire, which started on September 18 and is burning 12 miles southwest of Enterprise in the Eagle Cap Wilderness, has been mapped at just over 1,000 acres and is uncontained. Trail closures are in place and visitors are advised to contact the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, who is managing this fire, prior to entering the area.

The Rooper fire burning three miles north of Antelope on Prineville District BLM lands was reported Tuesday afternoon. The fire in grass and brush is 600 acres and 10 percent contained.

For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/  - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38

Kevin Weeks - ODF Public Affairs Office

Reward offered for Slate Creek fire cause information



The Oregon Dept. of Forestry and the Oregon Council Against Arson are offering up to $5,000 for information that leads to the arrest and conviction of the person, or people, who caused the Slate Creek Fire. The fire started on Labor Day around 1:30 p.m. in a densely wooded area southwest of Waters Creek Road, located ten miles southwest of Grants Pass and west of Hwy 199 near the community of Wonder. Specifically, the fire started along a road called the Root Springs Access Rd, about 2 miles up Waters Creek Rd.

The Slate Creek Fire burned 160 acres of Bureau of Land Management and private forestland, and cost the state more than $1.5 million to extinguish.

Anyone who has information about this fire is encouraged to call (800) 452-7888. Information is confidential. Several tips have already been received.

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Brian Ballou, ODF SW Oregon District

Milepost 66 fire in the Gorge approaching 50 acres


The Milepost 66 fire in the Columbia Gorge, burning 2 miles east of Hood River, is estimated Wednesday morning at 50 acres. Fire crews provided attack on the fire burning in steep terrain throughout the night after the fire was reported just after 8:00pm Tuesday. The fire is burning along the Mark Hatfield trail between Hood River and Mosier; the trail is closed during the fire response. Cause of the fire is under investigation


The fire crosses several ownership types, and resources from ODF, the U.S. Forest Service, multiple fire districts including Wy’East Fire District and Westside FD are assigned to the fire. An estimated 30 fire personnel from all responding agencies worked the fire Tuesday night. Mutual aid is being provided from a Washington DNR fire engine. Wednesday, 4 ODF engines are working the fire and an ODF helicopter has been ordered for air attack on the fire, in addition to the USFS units and local fire districts providing mutual aid on the fire.

ODOT advises that one eastbound lane of Interstate 84 is blocked between MP 66 and 67 due to fire activity. Motorists are advised to be prepared for slow downs.

Kevin Weeks - ODF Public Affairs Office

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

Hunter information booths this week in central Oregon


Fire danger remains high in central Oregon. The message to hunters and recreationists is to call ahead to the area you are visiting and find out the current fire use restrictions, which can change quickly and vary from place to place. Fire season remains in effect on all Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands.


In an effort to prevent human-caused fires during hunting season, wildland fire officials will host Hunter Information Booths across Central Oregon Wednesday, Sept. 26 to Friday, Sept. 28. (See below for location and times). Current fire restriction information will be provided to the public regarding open fires, off-road driving, chainsaw use, smoking in the forest, and more. Maps will be available for sale and road closure information will also be available. Coffee will also be available at most locations.

Hunter Booth Locations:

Prineville - at Ray's on the East side of Prineville off Highway 26

Wednesday 9/26/12 5:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Thursday 9/27/12 5:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Friday 9/28/12 5:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Sisters- at Ray's West end of Sisters on Highway 20

Thursday 9/27/12 6 a.m.- 6 p.m.

Friday 9/28/12 6 a.m.- 6 p.m.

La Pine - at Ray's located on Hwy 97 South in La Pine

Thursday 9/27/12 6 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Friday 9/28/12 6 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Walker Range/Crescent -- Highway 58 at mile post 71

Thursday 9/27/12 10 a.m. - 7 p.m.

Friday 9/28/12 10 a.m. - 7 p.m.

The Dalles - Memaloose Rest Area on Interstate 84

Thursday 9/27/12 6 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Friday 9/28/12 6 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
The Dalles - Dodson Road

Thursday 9/27/12 9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Friday 9/28/12 9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Mt. Vernon on Hwy 26

Wednesday 9/26/12 6 a.m.- 6 p.m.

Thursday 9/27/12 6 a.m.- 6 p.m.

Friday 9/28/12 6 a.m.- 6 p.m.


The hunter booths are brought to you by the Central Oregon Fire Prevention Cooperative, the Klamath County Fire Prevention Cooperative the Mid-Columbia Fire Prevention Cooperative and the Grant-Harney Fire Prevention Co-op.

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Burning ban remains in effect in Linn, Benton, Marion counties


Even though the calendar says summer has passed, residents of Linn, Benton and Marion counties are reminded that the ban on backyard debris burning that began June 15 remains in effect till further notice.

The annual three-county burn ban continues with the provision “until further notice” due to the current fire danger.

The fire officials noted that the small amount of rain the weekend before last had no enduring effect on wildfire risk.

“The weather patterns need to change to a winter weather model before open outdoor burning can be done safely,” said the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Allison Blair.

Scarcity of firefighting resources also figured into the decision to extend the ban this year. With several large fires burning throughout the West, firefighting resources continue to be stretched thin.

Rural fire agencies and the Oregon Department of Forestry have the authority to enforce and regulate the burn ban. Under Oregon Revised Statute Chapter 477, the department may issue citations for violation of the burning restrictions.

For more information on the open burning restrictions as well as advice on safe debris disposal, contact the nearest Department of Forestry office or the local fire department.

Contacts:
Allison Blair, ODF Philomath Unit
Chad Calderwood, ODF Sweet Home Unit
Chris Paul, ODF Santiam Unit

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Morning update - September 25, 2012


No new fires 10 acres in size or larger on ODF-protected lands were reported in the past 24 hours to the Salem Coordination Center.


The Grave Creek fire in Josephine County burning 11 miles southwest of Glendale is 26 acres in size and 70 percent contained. The Oregon Department of Forestry, United States Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, Rogue River Fire District, Douglas Forest Protective Association, Douglas County and DOC Shutter Creek inmates are among the 60 fire personnel assigned to the fire. Fire began Sunday evening, cause of which remains under investigation.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS

The Pole Creek Fire, burning six miles southwest of Sisters, is 26,285 acres and 70 percent contained. Fire managers anticipate the fire being fully contained by October 15. A community fire information update is planned for Wednesday, September 26th at 7:30 P.M. at the Sisters Elementary School. Residents in the Crossroads and Edgington/Remuda areas remain under a Level 2, pre-evacuation alert. More information on this fire is available on Inciweb at: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/3244

The lightning-caused Bald Mountain Fire, which started on September 18 and is burning 12 miles southwest of Enterprise in the Eagle Cap Wilderness, is approximately 1200 acres and uncontained. Trail closures are in place and visitors are advised to contact the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, who is managing this fire, prior to entering the area.

For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/  - or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38

Kevin Weeks - ODF Public Affairs Office

Where do I go for fire restriction information?


Fire season remains in effect on all Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands. Closures exist on many federal-managed lands and several large private forest land owners have also closed access to their lands.


The message to hunters and recreationists is to call ahead to the area you are visiting and find out the current fire use restrictions, which can change quickly and vary from place to place.

Fire restriction/fire use information can be found at the following locations:

Private lands in the central Oregon area

Oregon Department of Forestry:

Crook, Deschutes, and Jefferson counties - Prineville Unit 541-447-5658

Gilliam, Morrow, Hood River, and Wasco counties - The Dalles Unit 541-296-4626

Wheeler, Grant, and Harney counties - John Day Unit 541-575-1139

http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/centraloregon/pages/index.aspx


Public lands in central Oregon

USDA - Forest Service

Deschutes National Forest 541-383-5300

Ochoco National Forest 541-416-6500

Malheur National Forest 541-575-1321

http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/centraloregon/fire/



USDI - Bureau of Land Management

Prineville District 541-416-6700

http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/centraloregon/fire/

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Grave Creek fire in SW Oregon


The Grave Creek fire in Josephine County 11 miles southwest of Glendale is now 26 acres in size and 70 percent contained. The Oregon Department of Forestry, United States Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, Rogue River Fire District, Douglas Forest Protective Association, Douglas County and Shutter Creek Corrections are among the 60 fire personnel assigned to the fire.


The fire started Sunday evening around 6:30. Four ODF engines were dispatched and worked overnight to insure the fire did not cross Marial- Reuben Road. Though the terrain is extremely steep and difficult to move in, fire crews are making progress in containing the fire, completing line construction on the east and west side (below the Rogue River Trail).

Closures in Effect:

• The Rogue River Trail is closed in the fire area, 1.5-to-2 miles downstream from the Grave Creek boat landing.

• Marial Rd. and Mt. Reuben Rd. are closed in the area nearest the fire.

Brian Ballou, ODF SW Oregon District

Monday, September 24, 2012

ODFW News Release:Dry weather could mean more land closures for deer hunters

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife released this news release on Friday, September 21 regarding private land closures during the upcoming hunting season.

Jeri Chase, Public Information Officer
Fire Duty Officer Pager #503-370-0403

Daily Fire Update, Monday, September 24, 2012

FIRE PREVENTION REMINDER
The fire danger level on many forestlands in Oregon is still extreme. A few fire prevention tips for private forest landowners and operators: 1) monitor weather conditions – such as humidity and wind – and consider earlier close-downs if the weather warrants it; 2) keep equipment in good working order and free from flammable debris, as well as parking it away from flammable material when shutting down for the day; 3) Fire Watches – stay on high alert; and 4) be prepared by performing daily checks of suppression and communications equipment.

For the public, campfires are still an issue in many areas. Open fires, including campfires, are prohibited on forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. On forestlands or in areas when campfires are allowed, they should be put completely out before leaving the campsite. To do so, drown the fire with an abundance of water, stir and separate the hot coals, and drown again until all of the heat has been removed.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
Southwest Oregon District: The Rancheria Fire, burning on BLM and private forestlands east of Butte Falls, was reported late Sunday afternoon. Initial attack efforts on this fire included crews, engines, air-tankers, and helicopters, and by early Sunday evening the fire was fully lined. Night shift crews working on the fire made good progress on extinguishing flames and mopping up hot spots around the 32-acre blaze. Today, two 20-person crews, four wildland fire engines, and three water tenders will continue pouring water onto flames. Smoke haze will be visible in the fire area throughout the day, and occasionally a tree may erupt in a fireball (a phenomenon firefighters call "torching," which is normal inside a forest which has recently burned) and send up a plume of smoke. Helicopters and an air tanker are available should firefighters need them. The cause remains under investigation.

Southwest Oregon District: The Grave Creek Fire broke out late Sunday in the Rogue River Wild & Scenic Area near Grave Creek, approximately 20 miles north of Grants Pass, and grew overnight to 10-15 acres. Fire crews made good progress during the night, and this morning their firelines are holding on the north, south and west flanks, but the east side of the fire is actively burning. Helicopters lifted off around 7:30 a.m. to join the firefight. The Rogue River Trail is closed in the fire area, 1.5-to-2 miles downstream from the Grave Creek boat landing, which is also closed, as are Marial and Reuben Roads in the area nearest the fire. A major concern today is boaters on the Rogue River today encountering helicopters, which will be dipping buckets of water from the river as part of the fire suppression effort. Cause of this fire is under investigation.

More information on both of these fires on the Southwest Oregon District is available on the Southwest Oregon Fire Blog at http://swofire.blogspot.com/ , as well as the district’s fire twitter feed about fires at http://twitter.com/swofire .

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON

The lightning-caused Bald Mountain Fire, which started on September 18 and is burning 12 miles southwest of Enterprise in the Eagle Cap Wilderness, is approximately 1200 acres and uncontained. Trail closures are in place and visitors are advised to contact the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, who is managing this fire, prior to entering the area.

The lightning-caused Trail 2 Fire, burning in the Metolius Bench Area, is 139 acres and 90 percent contained. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is leading the suppression effort. Unless the situation changes, this will be the last report on this fire.

The Pole Creek Fire, burning six miles southwest of Sisters, is 26,200 acres and 65 percent contained. More information on this fire is available on Inciweb at: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/3244/.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/, or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. Because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies commonly work closely together.

This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected land, and on the department's role as a partner in fighting major fires that start on land protected by other agencies.
  Jeri Chase, Public Information Officer Fire Duty Officer Pager #503-370-0403

Friday, September 21, 2012

Prescribed Burn at the Oregon Garden aims to re-create oak savannah

The Oregon Department of Forestry issued this news release yesterday.


For immediate release
Major media distribution
September 20, 2012
Contact:
Kris Babbs, 503-945-7444, kbabbs@odf.state.or.us
Rod Nichols, 503-945-7425, rnichols@odf.state.or.us


Firefighters will shift roles and set a fire at The Oregon Garden. A prescribed burn to remove excess vegetation will be conducted on Sept. 24 by the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF), The Oregon Garden and Silverton Fire and Rescue.

“This burn of a 12-acre unit within a grove of white oaks is the second phase of a project begun last year,” said Oregon Department of Forestry’s Chris Paul.

The earlier work reduced overgrown vegetation through manual brush removal, tree pruning and herbicide treatment. The aim of the ongoing project, he said, is to create conditions characteristic of the original oak savanna, a lightly forested grassland dominated by oak trees.

The burn will be ignited around 1 p.m. and is expected to be completed in about two hours. It will be staffed by the agencies’ firefighters to contain it within the boundaries of the unit. ODF meteorologists are monitoring weather and wind conditions to minimize smoke intrusion into Silverton. The prescribed burn will be rescheduled if conditions aren’t optimum on Monday.

He said forest fuels such as Himalayan blackberry, Scotch broom and other non-native and invasive plant species will be removed to encourage the growth of camas and other native plants and grasses.

The burn will be visible from the deck of The Oregon Garden Fire Safety House, a new life-sized exhibit that features fire-safe home construction material and design improvements, fire-resistant landscaping plants, and a self-guided interpretive tour on how to reduce the surrounding fuels that could cause a wildfire to encroach on a home.

“Silverton residents and visitors to The Oregon Garden should expect smoke in the area during ignitions and as the fire smolders down,” he said.

The forester advised residents who are sensitive to smoke or have pre-existing respiratory problems to limit their outdoor activities on the day of the burn, particularly during the afternoon, and to keep windows closed. More information about how to limit exposure to smoke is available at: www.deq.state.or.us/aq/burning/wildfires/visibility.htm.

The prescribed burn will also serve as a training tool for firefighters to work with live fire and hone their skills in wildfire suppression tactics.


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Jeri Chase, ODF Public Information Officer
Fire Duty Officer Pager Number: 503-370-0403

Daily Fire Update for Friday, September 21, 2012.

FIRE PREVENTION REMINDER
The fire danger level on many forestlands in Oregon is still extreme. A few fire prevention tips for private forest landowners and operators: 1) monitor weather conditions – such as humidity and wind – and consider earlier close-downs if the weather warrants it; 2) keep equipment in good working order and free from flammable debris, as well as parking it away from flammable material when shutting down for the day; 3) Fire Watches – stay on high alert; and 4) be prepared by performing daily checks of suppression and communications equipment.
For the public, campfires are still an issue in many areas. Open fires, including campfires, are prohibited on forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. On forestlands or in areas when campfires are allowed, they should be put completely out before leaving the campsite. To do so, drown the fire with an abundance of water, stir and separate the hot coals, and drown again until all of the heat has been removed.
FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported over the past 24 hours on forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON

The lightning-caused Bald Mountain Fire, which started on September 18 and is burning 12 miles southwest of Enterprise in the Eagle Cap Wilderness, is approximately 600 acres and uncontained. Trail closures are in place and visitors are advised to contact the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, who is managing this fire, prior to entering the area.

The lightning-caused Trail 2 Fire, burning in the Metolius Bench Area, is 139 acres and 50 percent contained. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is leading the suppression effort.

The Pole Creek Fire, burning six miles southwest of Sisters, is 25,553 acres and 40 percent contained. Active fire behavior produced smoke columns on the southwest side of the fire early in the day yesterday and from the north side late in the afternoon. There is a RED FLAG WARNING in effect from this evening through Saturday evening for the fire area due to potential for thunderstorms producing abundant lightning later today and tonight. The Incident Management Team (Oregon Interagency IMT 4; Incident Commander Brian Watts) that is managing operations on this fire will host camp tours at the Command Post at the Sisters Rodeo Grounds on Saturday, September 22, at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. The public is welcome to come and see how an Incident Management Camp operates. More information on this fire is available on Inciweb at: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/3244/ .

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/ , or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38 .

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. Because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies commonly work closely together.

This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected land, and on the department's role as a partner in fighting major fires that start on land protected by other agencies.


Jeri Chase, ODF Public Information Officer Fire Duty Officer Pager #503-370-0403

Thursday, September 20, 2012

Daily Fire Update - September 20, 2012

FIRE PREVENTION REMINDER

The fire danger level on many forestlands in Oregon is still extreme. A few fire prevention tips for private forest landowners and operators: 1) monitor weather conditions – such as humidity and wind – and consider earlier close-downs if the weather warrants it; 2) keep equipment in good working order and free from flammable debris, as well as parking it away from flammable material when shutting down for the day; 3) Fire Watches – stay on high alert; and 4) be prepared . by performing daily checks of suppression and communications equipment.

For the public, campfires are still an issue in many areas. Open fires, including campfires, are prohibited on forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. On forestlands or in areas when campfires are allowed, they should be put completely out before leaving the campsite. To do so, drown the fire with an abundance of water, stir and separate the hot coals, and drown again until all of the heat has been removed.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported over the past 24 hours on forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON
The lightning-caused Trail 2 Fire, burning in the Metolius Bench Area, is 109 acres and uncontained. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is leading the suppression effort.

The Hunsaker Fire, burning 15 miles northeast of Halfway, is 693 acres and 90 percent contained. The fire is being managed by the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest. Unless the situation changes, this will be the last report on this fire.

The lightning-caused Ka Nee Ta Fire, burning two miles east of Kah Nee Ta Resort, is 115 acres and 90 percent contained. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is leading the suppression effort. Unless the situation changes, this will be the last report on this fire.

The lightning-caused Bear Slide Fire, burning five miles north-northeast of Warm Springs, is 1,680 acres and 90 percent contained. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is leading the suppression effort. Unless the situation changes, this will be the last report on this fire.

The lightning-caused Cache Creek Fire, burning north-northeast of Enterprise in Wallowa County, is 73,697 acres and 90 percent contained. More information on this fire is available on Inciweb at: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/3202/ . Unless the situation changes, this will be the last report on this fire.
The Pole Creek Fire, burning six miles southwest of Sisters, is 24,392 acres and 40 percent contained, with most growth yesterday in the southwest corner of the fire in the Three Sisters Wilderness. A community fire information update is planned for tonight, September 20 at 7:30 pm at the Sisters Elementary School, on 611 East Cascades Avenue. Smoke settled over the fire again last night making visibility poor; the overnight smoke inversion is forecasted to lift by late morning, with air fully mixing by afternoon and improving air conditions. ALL major routes remain open to tourist destinations like Sisters and other central Oregon communities. Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team 4 (Incident Commander: Brian Watts) is managing operations on this fire. More information on this fire is available on Inciweb at: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/3244/ .

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION

For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/, or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. Because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies commonly work closely together.

This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected land, and on the department's role as a partner in fighting major fires that start on land protected by other agencies.

Jeri Chase, Fire Duty Officer Pager #503-370-0403

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Daily fire update - 09-19-12


FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
The 15-acre Jimmy Creek Fire burning in Douglas County in the jurisdiction of the Coos Forest Protective Association was fully contained at 7 p.m. on Sept. 18. Cause is under investigation.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON
The lightning-caused Trail 2 Fire burning in the Metolius Bench Area is 109 acres and uncontained. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is leading the suppression effort.

The Hunsaker Fire burning 15 miles northeast of Halfway, Oregon, is 693 acres and 60 percent contained. The fire is being managed by the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest.

The lightning-caused Ka Nee Ta Fire burning two miles east of Kah Nee Ta Resort is 115 acres and 90 percent contained. The fire is in mop-up and patrol status. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is leading the suppression effort.

The lightning-caused Bear Slide Fire burning five miles NNE of Warm Springs is 1,680 acres and 90 percent contained. The fire is in mop-up and patrol status. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is leading the suppression effort.

The lightning-caused Cache Creek Fire burning NNE of Enterprise in Wallowa County is 73,697 acres and 90 percent contained. The temporary closure in Hells Canyon was lifted Sept. 18. Travelers are asked to continue to exercise caution. The suppression effort is being managed by a local Type 4 incident management team.

The Pole Creek Fire burning six miles southwest of Sisters is 22,000 acres and 20 percent contained. Firefighters completed burnouts on the NW corner of the fire on Tuesday evening. Crews worked to keep the fire within established containment lines on the S, E and N perimeters, and were able to keep the fire west of Road 16. The U.S. Forest Service is leading the suppression effort.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, http://nwccweb.us/index.aspx, or to the national Incident Information System Internet site, http://inciweb.org/38 .

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. Because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies commonly work closely together.

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Jimmy Creek Fire burning in Coos County

The 15-acre Jimmy Creek Fire was reported today burning in Douglas County.  The Coos Forest Protective Association is fighting the fire, which is currently uncontrolled and burning in timber along steep rock bluffs. Extended attack is expected. Two helicopters, four fire engines, one bulldozer, one water tender and six hand crews have been assigned to the suppression action.

Comments and questions

The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

Cool, wet weather in the winter of 2016-17 ended Oregon's long drought and left a thick snowpack at higher elevations which will take some time to melt. However, even in non-drought years Oregon's warm, dry summers create conditions that allow for fire to start and spread. In an average summer firefighters still see almost a thousand fires on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.



What we do

Protection jurisdiction

The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state- and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. There are about 30.4 million total acres of forest in Oregon.



Fire suppression policy

The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. While suppressing large fires can cost millions of dollars, economic and environmental damage from wildfires can be many times greater.




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About Me

My photo
Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers in Salem, Ore., maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.