Current situation

With fire season ended, most burning in Oregon forestland in the late fall consists of controlled burns to eliminate piles of woody debris left over after logging or thinning. The timing of such burns is carefully regulated to minimize the chance of smoke entering heavily populated areas.

































Thursday, September 20, 2012

Daily Fire Update - September 20, 2012

FIRE PREVENTION REMINDER

The fire danger level on many forestlands in Oregon is still extreme. A few fire prevention tips for private forest landowners and operators: 1) monitor weather conditions – such as humidity and wind – and consider earlier close-downs if the weather warrants it; 2) keep equipment in good working order and free from flammable debris, as well as parking it away from flammable material when shutting down for the day; 3) Fire Watches – stay on high alert; and 4) be prepared . by performing daily checks of suppression and communications equipment.

For the public, campfires are still an issue in many areas. Open fires, including campfires, are prohibited on forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. On forestlands or in areas when campfires are allowed, they should be put completely out before leaving the campsite. To do so, drown the fire with an abundance of water, stir and separate the hot coals, and drown again until all of the heat has been removed.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported over the past 24 hours on forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS IN OREGON
The lightning-caused Trail 2 Fire, burning in the Metolius Bench Area, is 109 acres and uncontained. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is leading the suppression effort.

The Hunsaker Fire, burning 15 miles northeast of Halfway, is 693 acres and 90 percent contained. The fire is being managed by the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest. Unless the situation changes, this will be the last report on this fire.

The lightning-caused Ka Nee Ta Fire, burning two miles east of Kah Nee Ta Resort, is 115 acres and 90 percent contained. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is leading the suppression effort. Unless the situation changes, this will be the last report on this fire.

The lightning-caused Bear Slide Fire, burning five miles north-northeast of Warm Springs, is 1,680 acres and 90 percent contained. The Bureau of Indian Affairs is leading the suppression effort. Unless the situation changes, this will be the last report on this fire.

The lightning-caused Cache Creek Fire, burning north-northeast of Enterprise in Wallowa County, is 73,697 acres and 90 percent contained. More information on this fire is available on Inciweb at: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/3202/ . Unless the situation changes, this will be the last report on this fire.
The Pole Creek Fire, burning six miles southwest of Sisters, is 24,392 acres and 40 percent contained, with most growth yesterday in the southwest corner of the fire in the Three Sisters Wilderness. A community fire information update is planned for tonight, September 20 at 7:30 pm at the Sisters Elementary School, on 611 East Cascades Avenue. Smoke settled over the fire again last night making visibility poor; the overnight smoke inversion is forecasted to lift by late morning, with air fully mixing by afternoon and improving air conditions. ALL major routes remain open to tourist destinations like Sisters and other central Oregon communities. Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team 4 (Incident Commander: Brian Watts) is managing operations on this fire. More information on this fire is available on Inciweb at: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/3244/ .

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION

For information on wildfires in all jurisdictions within Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, www.nwccweb.us/, or to the national Incident Information System website, www.inciweb.org/state/38.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
The Oregon Department of Forestry is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. Because fires starting on one ownership type may spread to others, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies commonly work closely together.

This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected land, and on the department's role as a partner in fighting major fires that start on land protected by other agencies.

Jeri Chase, Fire Duty Officer Pager #503-370-0403

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Comments and questions

The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

Cool, wet weather in the winter of 2016-17 ended Oregon's long drought and left a thick snowpack at higher elevations which will take some time to melt. However, in the summer of 2017 a series of heatwaves and a prolonged stretch of dry weather created conditions that dried forest fuels, allowing fires to start and spread. The result was more than a thousand fires on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Ninety-five percent of these were put out at less than 10 acres.






What we do

Protection jurisdiction

The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. In total there are about 30.4 million acres of forest in Oregon.



Fire suppression policy

The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. While suppressing large fires can cost millions of dollars, economic and environmental damage from wildfires can be many times greater.





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About Me

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Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers in Salem, Ore., maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.