Current situation

Widespread rain and unseasonably cool temperatures in Oregon have dampened existing fires and prevented new ones, easing the strain on firefighting resources. At the same time, wet conditions are making it harder on firefighters trying to remove equipment and repair the impacts from suppression efforts. In steep areas that burned earlier this summer, mudflows, rockslides and fire-weakened trees falling are concerns.






















Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Lightning brings several fires to Central Ore July 31, evening

FIRE NEWS--Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center
For Immediate Release: July 31, 2013 6:30 p.m.
Contact: Media Desk, 541/416-6811 Website: www.fs.fed.us/r6/centraloregon/fire
Email: coidcincidentinformation@gmail.com
Follow Us On Twitter: @CentralORFire


Lightning brings several fires to area

Central Oregon – As expected, lightning moving across Central Oregon in the late afternoon kept initial attack firefighting resources busy responding to incidents on state and federal lands.

Crews responded to approximately 29 reports of smoke beginning around 3 p.m. By about 6 p.m. approximately 700 hundred lightning strikes had hit Central Oregon.

Airtankers dropped retardant and engines and crews responded to a fire, approximately 5 miles northeast of Sisters, OR that was threatening structures in the Squaw Creek Canyon Estates on private, state-protected lands. By 6:30 p.m. the crews had put dozer line completely around the fire.

Two small fires, approximately 3 to 4 miles west of the western edge of Cultus Lake, in the Three Sisters Wilderness were being responded to by helicopter rappel crews due to their remote nature. Approximately 4 miles northwest of the western edge of Cultus Lake, smokejumpers responded to a series of small fires around Little Round Top Mountain on the border of the Willamette National Forest and the Deschutes National Forest.

Two fires, one about 3 miles and one about 5 miles south of Lava River Cave, also had crews on them as the afternoon turned to evening. Near Suttle Lake, there was a fire about 2 ½ miles directly north of the lake and another fire approximately 1 ½ miles east of the lake’s eastern edge. Firefighters were responding.

Oregon Dept. of Forestry fire update - July 31 afternoon

This is an Oregon Dept. of Forestry (ODF) fire update for the afternoon of July 31, 2013.

FIRES ON OREGON DEPT. OF FORESTRY-PROTECTED LANDS
The 21,400-acre, lightning-caused Douglas Complex fires are burning seven miles north of Glendale in Douglas County, and are 5 percent contained.

The Douglas Complex is now the highest priority nationally for resources.

Late Saturday evening Governor Kitzhaber declared the Douglas County Complex a conflagration. The declaration authorized the State Fire Marshal to mobilize structural firefighters and equipment to assist local resources battling the fire and working to protect structures. More than 400 homes are threatened. The Oregon Office of the State Fire Marshal is managing the fire jointly with Oregon Department of Forestry.

Oregon National Guard air and ground resources are being mobilized to the Douglas Complex today.

Douglas Complex Special Message: Evacuations are still in effect for Reuben Road, Mt. Reuben Road and McCullough Creek Road in Douglas County. Josephine County is also continuing evacuations for Poorman Creek, Lower Graves Creek Road, Graves Creek Road, and Lower Wolf Creek. The Governor has declared a State of Emergency for Josephine and Douglas Counties.

Douglas Complex Current Situation: The Douglas Complex has added a fourth branch to the complex.
The Complex currently consists of Milo, on the east side of Interstate 5; Rabbit Mountain, on the west side of Interstate 5 northwest of Glendale; Dad’s Creek, west of Glendale, and the Farmer’s Fire south of Glendale.

ODF Incident Management Team 2 (IC’s: Dennis Sifford, ODF, John Ingrao, State Fire Marshal Office) are managing the Douglas Complex. Firefighters are contending with hazards including falling boulders and trees and old mine shafts, which are affecting access into some of the fire area. Values at risk include homes, commercial timberland, and critical wildlife habitat. There are no reports of homes burned. Two minor injuries have been reported. Two outbuildings have been destroyed.
The incident command post is located at the Glendale High School in the community of Glendale.

Milo
Milo Branch is a group of smaller fires, all less than 20 acres in size. Firefighters are patrolling these fires today. No further control problems are expected on these fires.

Rabbit Mountain
Near Middle Creek, firefighters continue to make progress on line construction as well as setting up hoses and water for use in extinguishing heat along the fire line. Spread of the fire was slowed by the cooler temperatures and increased humidity yesterday.

Dad’s Creek
The south end of the fire continues to burn actively near Grave Creek; however, growth has slowed with the increased humidity and cooler temperatures. Overnight, on Dad’s Creek Fire, structure protection resources assigned in the Cow Creek Road area and Rattlesnake Road area made good progress helping Oregon Department of Forestry crews prepare the area for burn out operations that are expected to take place in the next 24-36 hours. The structure protection task forces assigned to that division reported good results with continued active fire behavior.

In Josephine County, overhead personnel spent a large part of the day accessing the area and reported challenging terrain, limited access, and active fire conditions. Approximately 30 homes are being threatened in the Grave Creek, Poorman Creek, and Lower Wolf Creek areas. Personnel will continue reconnaissance in these areas to get an accurate count of the number of structures threatened and formulate structure protection plans.

The fire is expected to burn actively again in the afternoon when temperature increases and winds start to affect fire movement. Smoke and erratic winds may impact air operations. Areas around Glendale will continue to see more smoke in the area.

Farmer’s Fire
Has been burning for several days in the Grants Pass Unit (ODF) has become part of the Complex. This fire is approximately 200-400 acres.

Weather: A Red Flag warning has been issued for the area. The warning indicates an increased risk of fire potential. This warning is based on high fire activity in the area and the dry fuel conditions. The threat of dry lightning and thunderstorms continues through Wednesday, with a chance for rain as the storm progresses. A drying trend is forecast for the weekend.

Evacuations and Closures:

• Cow Creek Road from Riddle into the fire area and from Glendale into the fire has been closed. The public is asked to honor the road blocks and not interfere with firefighters working in the area.
• Evacuations have been ordered for McCullough Creek Road, Reuben Road, and Mt. Reuben Road in Douglas County, and Poorman Creek Road, Lower Grave Creek, Grave Creek, and Lower Wolf Creek in Josephine County.
• An additional three hundred sixty five residences are considered threatened. This means evacuations could be necessary at some point in the future. Any official evacuation orders would be issued by the Douglas County or Josephine County Sheriff’s Offices.

Fire Information Meetings: A public meeting is planned in Wolf Creek for Thursday night, August 1, at 6:00 pm at the Community Center.

Public Safety/Prevention: Due to winds transitioning from the northwest and inversions setting in at night, thick smoke from the Dad’s Creek fire is settling into Glendale during the morning hours. To address any concern as a result of smoke in the area, an air quality sensor has been installed in Glendale. Go to www.oregonsmoke.blogspot.com to track air quality measurements.

Douglas Forest Protective Association has increased prevention restrictions to IFPL 3, where a 1 p.m. shutdown is in effect. Public restrictions are also in place. Check www.dfpa.net before commencing your activities.

Resources Include: 41 Type 2 hand crews, 86 engines, 15 dozers, 27 water tenders, 3 Type 1 helicopters, 6 Type 2 helicopters, and 2 Type 3 helicopters
and overhead personnel. There are 1,387 personnel assigned to this fire.

The Brimstone Fire is 1,600 acres and burning in Josephine County northwest of Grants Pass, 10 miles Northwest of Merlin, Oregon. The fire is 10 percent contained and burning in old growth, logging slash and mixed hardwood conifer stands in steep terrain with rolling debris and falling snags. There is limited visibility and lack of aircraft support due to smoke inversion from the Douglas Complex. ODF’s Incident Management Team 3 has been assigned to this fire.

The fire made no significant movement late Tuesday or overnight. Crews coming in from night shift said planned fireline improvement on the north and southeast corners was completed, and burnouts in those same areas were successful. There is a low risk of structures burning in this time period.

Resources and strategy
There are 773 personnel and firefighters assigned to the Brimstone Fire's suppression effort. Specifically, 29 crews, 26 wildland fire engines, seven bulldozers and nine water tenders are divided between the day and night shifts.The weather has been calm and this has helped reduce fire activity. However, the heavy smoke layer has made it impossible to use helicopters on the fire.

The current strategy is to strengthen control lines and completely encircle the fire using additional fire hoses and tenders to provide water for hot spots. As a contingency, a secondary fire line was created through a connecting network of newly opened roads and established roads. While fire officials were generally pleased with progress made early Wednesday morning, extreme fire conditions still threaten control lines. Air attack is hampered by heavy smoke and the fire team is preparing for increased winds that could affect fire behavior and pose hazardous conditions for firefighters.

No evacuations have been announced for residential areas around the fire area, but structural fire protection personnel have assessed homes should an evacuation become necessary. To find out more about evacuation planning, call the Josephine County Emergency Operations Center (EOC) at (541) 474-5305.

Firefighters ask that the public not use roads in the Upper Quartz Creek Rd and Hogs Creek Rd areas because these roads are narrow and are being heavily used by fire engines, trucks hauling water, and bulldozers.

Information about the Brimstone Fire can be learned by calling (541) 479-3842.

Information about other fires in southwest Oregon can be had by calling the Joint Information Center (JIC) at (541) 471-6620.

Big Windy Complex is lightning-caused and is now estimated at 2,914 acres. The Complex consists of the Big Windy (Josephine County), Calvert Peak and Jenny Fires (Curry County) and is located on Medford District, Bureau of Land Management lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. It is 0 percent contained.

Location is approximately 8 miles northwest of Galice; the north part of the fire is within two miles of Winkel Bar on the Rogue River. Pacific NW IMT2 assumed command yesterday. Weather: A Red Flag warning was issued at midnight and extends to 2 pm today.

News & Highlights: The BLM portion of the Wild Section of the Rogue River is closed from Graves Creek to Mule Creek effective today due to extreme fire conditions, and public health and safety issues. Also, the Medford District of the Bureau of Land Management has given official notice that the Rogue River Trail from Grave Creek to the Rogue River Ranch is temporarily closed. All entry is restricted in order to protect the public during fire suppression operations.

Additionally, watercraft will be launched from the Graves Creek put-in to deliver supplies to crews working to provide structure protection for Black Bar Lodge, Zane Grey Cabin and the Rogue River Ranch. As visibility allows, helicopters will assist with the transfer of supplies from ground transport to the boats at Graves Creek.

Cooperating agencies & partners: Oregon Department of Forestry, Medford District Bureau of Land Management, Josephine County, Curry County, Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest.

The Rawhide 2 Fire in Eastern Oregon was reported Saturday burning in grass and timber approximately 7 miles east of Elgin. The 30-acre fire is 90 percent contained.

The Ferguson Mountain Fire in Eastern Oregon, Lake Unit, was reported Sunday; this 15-acre fire is now 100 percent lined and is 98 percent mopped up.

The 503-acre Davis Creek Fire burning in the John Day Unit of the Central Oregon District is 100 percent contained. The fire was burning in grass and timber fuels. There are still hot spots and the fire is in patrol status. Cause is under investigation.


FIRES BURNING ON OTHER LANDS
The 3,080-acre, lightning-caused Whiskey Complex fire burning in timber six miles east of Tiller on the Tiller Ranger District of the Umpqua National Forest is 10 percent contained. The Complex consists of 4 fires, they are the Whisky Fire (2,250 acres), the Big Brother Fire (250 acres), the Buckeye Fire (550 acres) and the Smith Ridge Fire (30 acres). Continued dry weather is forecast. The incident is being managed by a unified command: Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team and the Douglas Forest Protective Association. For more information go to: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3562/

The 1,750-acre lightning-caused Labrador Fire is burning in an area south and west of the Illinois River in inaccessible country approximately 30 miles southwest of Grants Pass, Oregon. Fire behavior yesterday continued to be moderated by smoke over the area. Suppression efforts are aimed at allowing the fire to slowly back down to the Illinois River on the south and east edges.

Suppression efforts are hampered by steep terrain and little road access, fire crews are also dealing with significant poison oak issues. Crews are continuing structural protection in Oak Flat and on private lands, and indirect fire line preparation. The structure protection at Oak Flat in Josephine County is nearly complete and fire fighters remain spike camped in the area in case they are needed. A public meeting will be held at the Josephine County building at 102 South Redwood Highway in Cave Junction at 7 pm Thursday, August 1. Information will be shred along with maps and presentations by fire managers.

Continued limited use of aircraft due to smoke over the fire, aviation resources being made available to other fires and will be re-engaged when smoke clears. Trail and road closures are in place. For more information go to: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3563/

The 108-acre Browns Creek Fire burning 17 miles northwest of Gilchrist near Browns Creek on Wickiup Reservoir is 100 percent contained. All campgrounds are now open and Forest Road 42 was opened last night.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2013, through today:*
Lightning-caused fires: 93 fires burned 722 acres
Human-caused fires: 417 fires burned 2,471 acres
Total: 510 fires burned 3,193 acres

10-year average (Jan. 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 113 fires burned 5,386 acres
Human-caused fires: 338 fires burned 1,415 acres
Total: 451 fires burned 6,801 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

*Note: When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer pager, 503-370-0403, 24/7 for fire information. The duty officer will call back promptly. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, go to the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or the national Incident Information System site.

ODF maintains a blog that includes breaking news on wildfires statewide, along with current fire statistics. The Southwest Oregon District maintains a blog with wildfire info specific to the region. In addition, the district provides a Twitter feed on fires as they occur.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update focuses primarily on firefighting activity on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger in size or of other significance. It also reports on ODF’s actions as a partner in fighting major fires that start on lands protected by other agencies.

ODF is responsible for fire protection on private and state-owned forestland, and on a limited amount of other forestlands, including those owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in western Oregon. Because fires may cross ownerships, and because of the need to share firefighting resources, agencies work closely together.

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Douglas Complex Fire Update July 31 9 a.m.


Oregon Department of Forestry Team 2- Dennis Sifford, Incident Commander
Oregon State Fire Marshal Office Green Team – John Ingrao, Incident Commander
Phone Numbers: 541-832-0136; 541-832-0137
Douglas County Information Number: 888-459-3830
Hours of operation: 8:00 am – 9:00 pm

July 31, 2013
9:00 am

The Douglas Complex is being jointly managed by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry and the Oregon Office of the State Fire Marshal.

Special Message:

Evacuations are still in effect for Reuben Road, Mt. Reuben Road and McCullough Creek Road in Douglas County. Josephine County is also continuing evacuations for Poorman Creek, Lower Graves Creek Road, Graves Creek Road, and Lower Wolf Creek.

On Tuesday the Governor declared a State of Emergency for Josephine and Douglas Counties.

Current Situation: The Douglas Complex has added a fourth branch to the complex – the Complex currently consists of Milo, on the east side of Interstate 5; Rabbit Mountain, on the west side of Interstate 5, northwest of Glendale, Dad’s Creek, west of Glendale, and the Farmer’s Fire south of Glendale. Firefighters are contending with hazards, like falling boulders and trees, and old mine shafts, which are affecting access into some of the fire area. Values at risk include homes, commercial timberland, and critical wildlife habitat. There are no reports of homes burned. Two minor injuries have been reported. Two outbuildings have been destroyed.

Milo
Milo Branch is a group of smaller fires, all less than 20 acres in size. Firefighters are patrolling these fires today. No further control problems are expected on these fires.

Rabbit Mountain
Near Middle Creek, firefighters continue to make progress on line construction as well as setting up hoses and water for use in extinguishing heat along the fire line. Spread of the fire was slowed by the cooler temperatures and increased humidity yesterday.

Dad’s Creek
The south end of the fire continues to burn actively near Grave Creek; however, growth has slowed with the increased humidity and cooler temperatures. Overnight, on Dad’s Creek Fire, structure protection resources assigned in the Cow Creek Road area and Rattlesnake Road area made good progress helping Oregon Department of Forestry crews prepare the area for burn out operations that are expected to take place in the next 24-36 hours. The structure protection task forces assigned to that division reported good results with continued active fire behavior.

In Josephine County, overhead personnel spent a large part of the day accessing the area and reported challenging terrain, limited access, and active fire conditions. Approximately 30 homes are being threatened in the Grave Creek, Poorman Creek, and Lower Wolf Creek areas. Personnel will continue reconnaissance in these areas to get an accurate count of the number of structures threatened and formulate structure protection plans.

The fire is expected to burn actively again in the afternoon when temperature increases and winds start to affect fire movement. Smoke and erratic winds may impact air operations. Areas around Glendale will continue to see more smoke in the area.

Weather: A Red Flag warning has been issued for the area. The warning indicates an increased risk of fire potential. This warning is based on high fire activity in the area and the dry fuel conditions. The threat of dry lightning and thunderstorms continues through Wednesday, with a chance for rain as the storm progresses. A drying trend is forecast for the weekend.

Evacuations and Closures:

• Cow Creek Road from Riddle into the fire area and from Glendale into the fire has been closed. The public is asked to honor the road blocks and not interfere with firefighters working in the area.
• Evacuations have been ordered for McCullough Creek Road, Reuben Road, and Mt. Reuben Road in Douglas County, and Poorman Creek Road, Lower Grave Creek, Grave Creek, and Lower Wolf Creek in Josephine County.
• An additional three hundred sixty five residences are considered threatened. This means evacuations could be necessary at some point in the future. Any official evacuation orders would be issued by the Douglas County or Josephine County Sheriff’s Offices.

Fire Information Meetings: A public meeting is planned in Wolf Creek for Thursday night, August 1, at 6:00 pm at the Community Center.

Public Safety/Prevention: Due to winds transitioning from the northwest and inversions setting in at night, thick smoke from the Dad’s Creek fire is settling into Glendale during the morning hours. To address any concern as a result of smoke in the area, an air quality sensor has been installed in Glendale. Go to www.oregonsmoke.blogspot.com to track air quality measurements.

Douglas Forest Protective Association has increased prevention restrictions to IFPL 3, where a 1 p.m. shutdown is in effect. Public restrictions are also in place. Check www.dfpa.net before commencing your activities.

Fire Statistics:
Location: 7 miles north of Glendale, OR Percent Contained: 5% Complex Size: 25,396 acres Cause: Lightning
Start Date: 7/26/13 Total Personnel: 1,387


Resources Include: 41 Type 2 hand crews, 86 engines, 15 dozers, 27 water tenders, and overhead personnel

Air Resources: 3 Type 1 helicopters, 6 Type 2 helicopters, and 2 Type 3 helicopters

Places to get information:

Douglas Forest Protective Association -www.dfpa.net
Twitter - www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA
Facebook - www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation
InciWeb - http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3559/
ODF PIO Blog - http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/.
ODF Southwest Oregon District - www.swofire.com
American Red Cross - www.redcross.org/nss
Air Quality – www.oregonblogspot.com

Oregon Military Dept., Oregon Emergency Management

The Oregon Military Department and the Oregon Office of Emergency Management are assisting with response to the Douglas Complex fire in Southern Oregon. The Douglas Complex fire, a group of lightning-caused wildfires in southern Douglas County and northern Josephine County, has burned more than 25,000 acres.
Multiple state agencies have responded to the fires, providing a variety of assets in support of the firefighting operations.

The Oregon Army National Guard is providing aviation assets at the request of the Oregon Department of Forestry. Five aircraft are prepared to help with fire suppression including three HH-60M Blackhawk helicopters, one CH-47 Chinook helicopter, and one UH-72 Lakota. Approximately 125 Soldiers along with 26 High Mobility Multi Wheeled Vehicles are also slated to be called-up on State Active Duty within the next 72 hours to assist with traffic control in the evacuated areas.

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management is assisting with coordinating response to the fires. The Oregon Dept. of Forestry is the lead response agency.

Contact: Kim Lippert, Public Information Officer, Oregon Emergency Management, 503-580-6874
Oregon Military Department Public Affairs (503) 584-3917
Angie Johnson, Oregon Dept. of Forestry (at the Douglas Complex) (541-832-0136; 541-832-0137

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

ODF fire update - July 30, 2013 afternoon

This is an Oregon Dept. of Forestry (ODF) fire update for the afternoon of July 30, 2013. Southern Oregon continues to be the focus of firefighting activity in the state with numerous large fires burning in the region.

FIRES ON OREGON DEPT. OF FORESTRY-PROTECTED LANDS

The 21,400-acre, lightning-caused Douglas Complex fires are burning seven miles north of Glendale in Douglas County, and are 2 percent contained.

Additional Homes Evacuated in Josephine County
Josephine County Sheriff issued a road closure order this afternoon due to fire activity in the area. Lower Wolf Creek Road is closed from the town of Wolf Creek to Leland Road. Lower Graves Creek Road is closed from Leland Road to the Rogue River. Josephine County Sheriff's Office also issued an evacuation order for all residences on Lower Graves Creek Road from the Graves Creek Bridge to Leland Road, Lower Wolf Creek Road, and from Lower Graves Creek to Water Tank Gulch. This new evacuation order affects an estimated 30 residences.

Evacuation orders are still in effect for:
* McCullough Creek Road, Reuben Road, and Mt. Reuben Road in Douglas County, and Poorman Creek Road in Josephine County.

Citizens can evacuate to Glendale Elementary School or Josephine County Fairgrounds:

* Glendale Elementary School is located at 100 Pacific Avenue in Glendale.
* Josephine County Fairgrounds is located at 1451 Fairgrounds Road in Grants Pass.

For more information, call Red Cross at 888-680-1455.


 
Resources include: 38 hand crews, 29 fire engines, 2 bulldozers, 8 water tenders, and overhead personnel. Air Resources: 3 Type 1 helicopters, 5 Type 2 helicopters, and 3 Type 3 helicopters

 
Big Windy Complex is lightning-caused and burning in steep terrain 25 miles Northwest of Grants Pass. It is located on Medford District Bureau of Land Management lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry, is 2,117 acres and threatening 33 structures.

The Big Windy Complex consists of 3 fires: The Big Windy, Calvert Peak, and Jenny Fires. The fires are burning northwest of Merlin, OR, and south of the Rogue River. Fire behavior is active with group torching and short-range spotting. The Jenny Fire is expected to cross the river to the east.


There is extremely limited visibility due to smoke inversion from the Douglas Complex. Pacific NW Incident Management Team 2 assumed command yesterday and the Incident Commander is Chris Schulte. Strategies are being developed for containment lines. Assessing of structure protection needs will continue and line construction will take place as additional resources report to the Complex.

Current resources: One heavy helicopter and one light helicopter are on loan to the Big Windy Complex from the Labrador Fire. There is also one light helicopter assigned. Ground operations: Crews focusing on point protection as needed and working on prepping for fire line construction. Fire crews scouting for potential medivac sites for the helicopters. Cooperating agencies & partners: Oregon Department of Forestry, Medford District BLM, Josephine County, Curry County, Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest.

For more information: 541-471-6620.

 The Brimstone Fire is 1,500 - 2,000 acres and burning in Josephine County northwest of Grants Pass, 10 miles Northwest of Merlin, Oregon. The fire is burning in old growth, logging slash and mixed hardwood conifer stands in steep terrain with rolling debris and falling snags. There is limited visibility and lack of aircraft support due to smoke inversion from the Douglas Complex.

 ODF’s Incident Management Team 3 has been assigned to this fire. There is a low risk of structures burning in this time period and no evacuation orders have been issued. Southerly movement will increase with day time heating; rapid growth will be expected if inversion breaks.

 Resources assigned: 29 handcrews, 8 helicopters, 28 engines, 3 bulldozers, 5 water tenders, plus overhead personnel.

For fire information: 541-479-3842

The Rawhide 2 Fire in Eastern Oregon was reported Saturday burning in grass and timber approximately 7 miles east of Elgin. The 30-acre fire is 90 percent contained.

The Ferguson Mountain Fire in Eastern Oregon, Lake Unit, was reported Sunday; this 15-acre fire is now 100 percent lined.

The 503-acre Davis Creek Fire reported July 28 burning in the John Day Unit of the Central Oregon District was fully lined the same day and is in mop-up. The fire is burning in grass and timber fuels. Cause is under investigation.

FIRES BURNING ON OTHER LANDS

The 2,400-acre, lightning-caused Whiskey Complex fires burning in timber six miles east of Tiller on the Tiller Ranger District of the Umpqua National Forest are uncontained. The four fires in the complex were reported July 26. The incident is being managed by a unified command: Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team and the Douglas Forest Protective Association. For more information go to: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3562/

The 700-acre, lightning-caused Labrador Fire reported July 26 is burning adjacent to the Illinois River 13 miles NW of Cave Junction near the community of Oak Flat. The lightning-caused fire reported July 26 is burning in the old Biscuit Fire area, which contains a lot of downed, jackstrawed trees and heavy brush. Crews are continuing structural protection and indirect fire line preparation. Trail and road closures are in place. For more information go to: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3563/

The 51,340-acre Sunnyside Turnoff Fire burning on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation at Eagle Butte Lookout is 95 percent contained. The fire was human caused. More information is available at: http://nwccweb.us/information/fire_info.aspx

The 108-acre Browns Creek Fire burning near Browns Creek on Wickiup Reservoir is fully lined. A local incident management team took command of the fire today, using federal, state and contract resources. Forest Road 42 remains closed to allow for helicopter bucket drops on the fire without endangering public traveling on the road. Though firefighters have made good progress on the fire, evacuations of campers in the area remain in place today.

Monday, July 29, 2013

Douglas Complex Fire Update - 3 p.m., July 29

Oregon Department of Forestry Incident Management Team 2:
Dennis Sifford, Incident Commander
Oregon State Fire Marshal Office Green Team - John Ingrao, Incident Commander
Hours of operation: 8:00 am - 9:00 pm
Phone Numbers: 541-832-0136; 541-832-0137
Douglas County Sheriff's Office Information Line: 1-888-459-3830

Additional Homes Evacuated in Josephine County
Josephine County Sheriff issued a road closure order this afternoon due to fire activity in the area. Lower Wolf Creek Road is closed from the town of Wolf Creek to Leland Road. Lower Graves Creek Road is closed from Leland Road to the Rogue River. Josephine County Sheriff's Office also issued an evacuation order for all residences on Lower Graves Creek Road from the Graves Creek Bridge to Leland Road, Lower Wolf Creek Road, and from Lower Graves Creek to Water Tank Gulch. This new evacuation order affects an estimated 30 residences.

Evacuation orders are still in effect for:
* McCullough Creek Road, Reuben Road, and Mt. Reuben Road in Douglas County, and Poorman Creek Road in Josephine County.

Citizens can evacuate to Glendale Elementary School or Josephine County Fairgrounds. Glendale Elementary School is located at 100 Pacific Avenue in Glendale. Josephine County Fairgrounds is located at 1451 Fairgrounds Road in Grants Pass.

For more information, call Red Cross at 888-680-1455.

Fire Statistics
Location: 7 miles north of Glendale, OR
Complex Size: 21,000 acres
Percent Contained: 2%
Cause: Lightning
Start Date: 7/26/13
Total Personnel:1,024

Resources
38 hand crews, 11 helicopters, 29 fire engines, 2 bulldozers, 8 water tenders, and overhead personnel

Places to get information
Douglas Forest Protective Association -www.dfpa.net
Twitter - www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA
Facebook - www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation
InciWeb - http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3559/
ODF PIO Blog - http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/
ODF Southwest Oregon District - www.swofire.com
American Red Cross - www.redcross.org/nss

Fire Contact Info
541-832-0136 or 541-832-0137

Oregon Dept. of Forestry fire update - July 29, 2013

Southern Oregon continues to be the focus of firefighting activity in the state with numerous large fires burning in the region.

FIRES ON OREGON DEPT. OF FORESTRY-PROTECTED LANDS
The 13,400-acre, lightning-caused Douglas Complex fires are burning seven miles north of Glendale in Douglas County. The Douglas Complex fires were ignited by lightning from thunderstorms the morning of July 26. The Oregon Office of the State Fire Marshal is managing the fire jointly with ODF. Structural protection task forces mobilized through the Fire Marshal kept busy Sunday on the Dad's Creek Fire as personnel worked among homes located along Reuben Road at the north end of the fire and to the south accessed from Mt. Reuben road. Structural protection crews worked in conjunction with helicopters and a bulldozer, building fire line to protect homes in the area.

Josephine County Sunday issued an evacuation order for residents living along Poorman Creek. Eight homes have been affected. Residents who have been evacuated can go to the American Red Cross Shelter that has been established at the Glendale Elementary School.

The Douglas Complex has been divided into three branches: Milo, on the east side of Interstate 5; Rabbit Mountain/Union Creek, on the west side of I-5, northwest of Glendale; and Dad's Creek/Panther Butte, west of Glendale. The fires continue to burn actively on the east side of I-5. All fires in the complex have been staffed, with private industrial landowners and 11 aircraft assisting firefighters in suppression. There are no reports of any homes being burned.

Milo Branch - a group of smaller fires, each less than 20 acres in size. Firefighters will begin mopping up hot areas of each fire. Minimal fire activity is expected today for this branch.

Rabbit Mountain/Union Creek - Fire on this branch has grown in all directions. This branch is expected to burn actively again today. Firefighters will continue building fire line on the east flank of the fire, working towards the north.

Dad's Creek/Panther Butte - The larger fire in this branch spread significantly to the south Sunday afternoon, growing on the eastern and western sides of Poorman Creek approximately 2-3 miles in either direction. Overnight, crews were able to take advantage of the cooler temperatures and higher humidity to build fire line and suppress any spot fires found in the area. The Fire Marshal's Office will evaluate the fire situation to the south and west of this fire, determining what impact there will be to structures. The fire is expected to burn actively again today in the afternoon when the temperature increases and winds start to affect fire movement. Smoke and erratic winds may impact aviation operations. Areas around Glendale will see more smoke in the area, mostly during the morning hours.

Evacuations and Closures:
Cow Creek Road from Riddle into the fire area, and from Glendale into the fire has been closed. The public is asked to honor the road blocks and not interfere with firefighters working in the area.

Evacuations have been ordered for McCullough Creek Road, Reuben Road, and Mt. Reuben Road in Douglas County, and Poorman Creek Road in Josephine County.

An additional 400 residences are considered threatened. This means evacuations could be necessary at some point in the future. Any official evacuation orders will be issued by the Douglas County or Josephine Sheriff's Offices.

Resources:
Resources fighting the complex fires include: 11 helicopters, 38 hand crews, 29 fire engines, two bulldozers and eight water tenders, with a total of 1,008 personnel staffing the complex.

Fire Information Meetings:
A community meeting is scheduled tonight at the Glendale Elementary School Gym, at 6:30 p.m. On Sunday a public meeting was held at the Glendale Elementary School with approximately 400 people attending.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS
The 1,649-acre, lightning-caused Whiskey Complex fires burning six miles east of Tiller on the Umpqua National Forest are uncontained. The three fires in the complex were reported July 26. For more information go to: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3562/

The 700-acre, lightning-caused Labrador Fire is burning adjacent to the Illinois River 13 miles NW of Cave Junction near the community of Oak Flat. It was reported July 26. For more information go to: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3563/

The 108-acre Browns Creek Fire burning near Browns Creek on Wickiup Reservoir is fully lined. The fire broke out Sunday and kept firefighters busy throughout the afternoon and evening. A local incident management team took command of the fire today, using federal, state and contract resources. Forest Road 42 remains closed today to allow for helicopter bucket drops on the fire without endangering public traveling on the road. Though firefighters have made good progress on the fire, evacuations of campers in the area remain in place today.

The 503-acre Davis Creek Fire reported July 28 burning in the John Day Unit of the Central Oregon District was fully lined the same day and is in mop-up. The fire is burning in grass and timber fuels. Cause is under investigation.

The 400-acre Labrador Fire burning west of the Illinois River downstream from Oak Flat on Bureau of Land Management lands protected by ODF is uncontained. The lightning-caused fire reported July 26 is burning in the old Biscuit Fire area, which contains a lot of downed, jackstrawed trees and heavy brush. Crews are continuing structural protection and indirect fire line preparation. Trail and road closures are in place.

The 51,340-acre Sunnyside Turnoff Fire burning on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation at Eagle Butte Lookout is 95 percent contained. The fire was human caused. More information is available at: http://nwccweb.us/information/fire_info.aspx

Sunday, July 28, 2013

EIGHT HOMES EVACUATED IN JOSEPHINE COUNTY

 


News Release from Oregon Dept. of Forestry
July 28, 2013

Issued 2:30 p.m.

Josephine County Sheriff's Office is asking residents of Poorman Creek Road, off of lower Graves Creek Road to evacuate due to danger from the Douglas Complex. The Dad's Creek Fire, within Douglas Complex, has grown farther south into Josephine County, threatening the homes along Poorman Creek Road. Crews, dozers, and fire engines, along with heavy helicopters and air tankers are currently working on the fires in the Glendale area.

Citizens can evacuate to Glendale Elementary School. Red Cross has a shelter set up there at 100 Pacific Avenue in Glendale. For more information, call Red Cross at 888-680-1455.


Places to get information:

Douglas Forest Protective Association -www.dfpa.net
Twitter - www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA
Facebook - www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation
InciWeb - http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3559/
ODF PIO Blog - http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/
ODF Southwest Oregon District - www.swofire.com

Contact Info:
Angie Johnson
Oregon Dept of Forestry
Incident Mgmt Team 2
541-832-0136; 541-832-0137

Browns Creek Fire update


 

 

FIRE NEWS--Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center

For Immediate Release:  July 28, 2013  5:15 p.m.

 
 

Browns Creek Fire
           
Central Oregon – A fire, which started at approximately 1 p.m., near Browns Creek on Wickiup Reservoir kept firefighters busy through the afternoon growing from 2 acres to approximately 40 acres by 5 p.m.

Campers at Sheep Bridge campground, areas adjacent to Forest Road 4280 (Forest spur roads 100 and 700), Gull Point Campground and South Twin Lake were evacuated throughout the afternoon with North Twin Lake area being put on notice for evacuation.  Forest Road 42, off of the Cascade Lakes Scenic Byway, was closed at approximately 3 p.m. for fire traffic and safety concerns.

Resources on the fire included 3 helicopters, 9 engines, 3 dozers, 2 water tenders, a 20 person hand crew, Redmond hotshots,  and both Deschutes County and Forest Service law enforcement personnel

More resources will continue to be assigned to the fire, including handcrews coming off of other local fire assignments.  A Type 3 team is expected to take over the fire early tomorrow morning.

Crews also assisted Jefferson County on a fire around 2 p.m. near Madras that threatened structures.  The fire was contained; however, one structure was burned.

Conditions remain hot and dry around Central Oregon.  Fire officials remind the public to be careful with their campfires.  Always watch or attend your campfire, and completely extinguish it upon leaving.

DOUGLAS COMPLEX FIRE UPDATE - 8 A.M., JULY 28, 2013


Special Message: Residents west of Glendale were evacuated late yesterday afternoon. Douglas County Sheriff's Office evacuated all homes west of McCullough Creek Road to Reuben. Residents east of McCullough Creek Road to the mill west of Glendale are being asked to prepare for potential evacuation. This means residents are warned that should conditions worsen, they also will be asked to evacuate. Seventy-five total homes have been affected.

Residents that have been evacuated can go to the American Red Cross Shelter that has been established at the Glendale Elementary School. You can contact Red Cross by calling 541-580-4568 or visiting the Red Cross website at www.redcross.org/nss.

The Oregon State Fire Marshal Office has an incident management team at the fire that is operating jointly with ODF personnel to assist with the fire threat to 45 structures. In addition to the team, four structure protection task forces have arrived and will be spread out amongst the threatened structures that were evacuated yesterday. Those task forces are comprised of personnel and resources from Lane, Linn, Marion, and Lincoln counties. Additional forces are available and will be ordered if needed.

Current Situation: The Douglas Complex has been divided up into three branches - Milo, on the east side of Interstate 5; Rabbit Mountain/Union Creek, on the west side of Interstate 5, northwest of Glendale, and Dad's Creek/Panther Butte, west of Glendale. Fire has been burning actively, yesterday and overnight, in both branches west of the interstate. All fires have been staffed, with private industrial landowners and ten aircraft assisting firefighters in suppression.

Milo

Milo Branch is a group of smaller fires, all less than 20 acres in size. They have been lined and firefighters will begin mopping up hot areas of each fire. Minimal fire activity is expected today for this branch.

Rabbit Mountain/Union Creek

This branch is expected to burn actively again today. The two main fires have grown together and have crossed Cow Creek Road on the south end. Firefighters will work towards building fire line on the east and north sides of the fire today.


Dad's Creek/Panther Butte

This branch burned actively yesterday to the south, crossing the District boundary between Douglas Forest Protective Association and Oregon Department of Forestry - Southwest Oregon District. The activity on this branch precipitated the evacuation of homes in the Reuben area and homes along McCullough Creek Road. The fire grew approximately 3000 acres yesterday afternoon. Oregon State Fire Marshal's Office has invoked the Conflagration Act and structural firefighting resources have been brought in from across Oregon to assist in protecting homes in this area.

Weather: Gusty winds and low relative humidity will impact firefighting efforts today until approximately 8:00 p.m. Temperatures will be several degrees lower than yesterday, ranging from 75 degrees to 85 degrees. Winds will come from the north at 10 mph, with gusts to 15 mph.

Evacuations and Closures: Cow Creek Road from Riddle into the fire area and from Glendale into the fire has been closed. The public is asked to honor the road blocks and not interfere with firefighters working in the area. Residents that have been evacuated can contact the Red Cross Shelter at Glendale Elementary School.

Fire Information Meetings: A community meeting will be planned for Monday night at the Glendale Elementary School Gym at 6:30 p.m., Monday, July 29, 2013.

Fire Statistics:

Location: 7 miles north of Glendale, OR
Percent Contained: 2%
Complex Size: 7,500 acres (better mapping reduced the acreage previously reported)
Cause: Lightning

Start Date: 7/26/13
Total Personnel: 751

Resources Include: 33 Type 2 hand crews, 10 engines, 2 dozers, 4 water tenders, and overhead personnel

Air Resources: 3 Type 1 helicopters, 5 Type 2 helicopters, and 2 Type 3 helicopters

Places to get information:

Douglas Forest Protective Association -www.dfpa.net

Twitter - www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA
Facebook - www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation

InciWeb - http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/3559/

ODF PIO Blog - http://wildfireoregondeptofforestry.blogspot.com/. Contact Info:
Oregon Department of Forestry Team 2- Dennis Sifford, Incident Commander

Oregon State Fire Marshal Office Green Team - John Ingrao, Incident Commander

Phone Number: 541-832-0136

Saturday, July 27, 2013

Douglas Complex grows to 10,000 acres Saturday

The Douglas Complex grew to 10,000 acres July 27, as hot, dry conditions caused most of the fires to spread. The state Conflagration Act was invoked today, and an Oregon Fire Marshal's structural fire management team has been mobilized to aid local fire departments with protection of homes.

The fires in the southern portion of the complex made a run Saturday to the east. The Douglas County Sheriff's Office evacuated homes in the community of Glendale this afternoon. Homes in the area west of McCullough Creek Road to Ruben Road were evacuated. Residents east of McCullough Creek Road to the mill west of Glendale have been asked to prepare for potential evacuation, should fire conditions worsen and require it.

Thunderstorms across southwestern Oregon Friday morning ignited the fires that are being managed collectively as the Douglas Complex.





Douglas Complex update - 5:30 p.m., July 27, 2013

The fires in the southern portion of the Douglas Complex in Douglas County made a run today to the east. The Douglas County Sheriff's Office evacuated homes in the community of Glendale this afternoon. Homes in the area west of McCullough Creek Road to Ruben Road were evacuated. Residents east of McCullough Creek Road to the mill west of Glendale have been asked to prepare for potential evacuation, should fire conditions worsen and require it.

 
Places to get information:


Douglas Forest Protective Association -www.dfpa.net

Twitter - www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA


Douglas Complex fires estimated at 4,000 - 5,000 acres

The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) today revised its estimate of the size of the Douglas Complex to between 4,000 and 5,000 acres based on new field observations. Ignited by lightning Friday morning, the fires making up the complex are burning in forest fuels parched by the sustained hot, dry weather in the Douglas County area. An ODF incident management team took over command of the suppression effort Saturday morning.

Vinci Fire in Western Lane District contained at 115 acres

The 115-acre Vinci Fire reported July 26 burning in the Southern Oregon Area's Western Lane District was contained Saturday and is in mop-up. Cause of the fire is under investigation.

Douglas Complex fires grow to 2,000 acres

An Oregon Dept. of Forestry (ODF) fire team Saturday morning assumed command of the suppression effort on the 2,000-acre Douglas Complex fires in Douglas County. ODF’s Incident Management Team 2 took over the fire suppression effort from the Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) at 8 a.m. on July 26. The incident command post is located at the Glendale High School in the community of Glendale.

Thunderstorms Friday morning ignited 54 fires on DFPA’s protection jurisdiction. A majority of the fires in the Complex are located in the Cow Creek Canyon west of Glendale. A handful of fires in the Milo area are included in the Complex. The total number of fires is expected to decrease, as several fires in close proximity to each other have burned together.

Central and southcentral Oregon experienced thunderstorms Friday evening. Today ODF and its partner agencies are locating and suppressing new fire starts from this latest lightning event.

Friday, July 26, 2013

ODF Fire Team taking over Douglas Complex fires

The Oregon Dept. of Forestry (ODF) Friday afternoon mobilized a fire team to manage a group of lightning-caused wildfires in Douglas County called the Douglas Complex. ODF’s Incident Management Team 2 will take over the fire suppression effort from the Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) on Saturday morning, July 26. The incident command post will be located at the Glendale High School in the community of Glendale.
Thunderstorms Friday morning ignited 52 fires on DFPA’s protection jurisdiction. The lightning-started blazes range from less than an acre up to several hundred acres in size.

No homes or other structures are currently threatened by the fires.

ODF, partners fighting 70 new lightning-caused wildfires

The Oregon Dept. of Forestry and its partners - forest landowners, federal resource agencies and local fire departments - are busy with 70 new wildfires ignited by lightning July 26.

ODF brought on a third contract air tanker and several additional helicopters today to bolster its fire suppression capability.

Eastern Oregon is experiencing lightning this afternoon, with more expected there and possibly also in central Oregon.  


Fifty-four new lightning-started wildfires reported in So. Oregon

Aerial and ground reconaissance following this morning's lightning event in southern Oregon has turned up 54 new fires in the Douglas County area. Two of the fires are five or more acres in size, and several others range from 2-3 acres.

The Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) has deployed firefighting resources to 30 of the fires. An Oregon Department of Forestry air tanker and four helicopters are working four of the blazes located in the Cow Creek area west of Riddle and in the Rabbit Mountain and Glendale areas. An additional helicopter has been ordered.

Four DFPA hand crews have joined the suppression effort, assisted by resources from Coos Forest Protective Association, forest landowners, local fire departments and the Bureau of Land Management.

Lightning ignites scores of new fires

Human-caused fires were the focus earlier this week with the Stagecoach and Sunnyside Turnoff fires, but lightning returned to center stage Friday morning in the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Southern and Eastern Oregon Areas. The Southern Oregon Area reported approximately 60 new lightning-started fires. In Douglas County alone, more than 200 lightning strikes were recorded. Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) firefighters have located eight fires thus far and expect to find more as reconnaissance continues. DFPA and other local fire departments are battling the fires.

The Klamath-Lake District in the Eastern Oregon Area received lightning across both its Klamath and Lake units. ODF fire managers are conducting aerial patrols this morning to locate any new fire starts. The Fremont-Winema National Forest and the Sheldon-Hart National Wildlife Refuge reported a total of two new fires on their lands.

ODF prepositioned extra firefighting resources in both areas ahead of the anticipated lightning to enable rapid initial attack on any new fires.

Firefighters in northern Klamath County on Wednesday continued to make progress on the 330-acre Stagecoach Fire burning about eight miles northeast of Gilchrist. The fire, burning on Bureau of Land Management and Walker Range Forest Protective Association lands, is now 70 percent contained. It was human caused.

FIRES BURNING ON OTHER LANDS
The 48,916-acre Sunnyside Turnoff Fire burning on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation at Eagle Butte Lookout remains at 40 percent containment. The fire was human caused. More information is available at: http://nwccweb.us/information/fire_info.aspx

Thursday, July 25, 2013

Smock Road Fire burning in The Dalles Unit

The 15-acre Smock Road Fire is burning in The Dalles Unit of the Central Oregon District in grass, oak and pine fuels about 10 miles west of Maupin. The fire's progress has been stopped, and mop-up was underway by late afternoon. The blaze was caused by a vehicle accident on Smock Road, in which a semi-truck hauling hay caught fire and the flames spread to roadside vegetation. Resources fighting the fire include eight fire engines, one hand crew and two helicopters. Two single-engine air tankers are en route. A couple of power poles were ignited by the fire, and a utility crew is on site. Agencies involved in the suppression effort include ODF, Bureau of Land Management and local fire departments.

Stagecoach Fire full containment expected July 26

FIRES ON OREGON DEPT. OF FORESTRY-PROTECTED LANDS
Firefighters in northern Klamath County on Wednesday continued to make progress on the 330-acre Stagecoach Fire burning about eight miles northeast of Gilchrist. The fire is 40 percent contained, with full containment expected Friday. It was human caused.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS
The 45,491-acre Sunnyside Turnoff Fire burning on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation at Eagle Butte Lookout is 40 percent contained. The fire was human caused. More information is available at: http://nwccweb.us/information/fire_info.aspx

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

State officials urge caution as wildfire conditions become extreme

July 24, 2013

State officials from the Oregon Department of Forestry and the Office of State Fire Marshal are encouraging Oregonians to use extreme caution as intense heat and dry thunderstorms are predicted for areas around the state for the next few days.

The increase in heat reduces the humidity and fuel moistures allowing fires to ignite quickly and burn hot and fast. Smoking, off road driving, campfires, mowing dry grass, the use of power saws, exploding targets and fireworks are examples of activities that are either restricted or prohibited entirely during fire season.

Officials advise contacting the local fire district or Oregon Department of Forestry office for specific restrictions in your area.

Also, to reduce the risk of a wildfire around your home, fire officials suggest removing dead vegetation a minimum of 30 feet around your house. In most cases, trees and healthy plants do not need to be removed. However, trees should be pruned and grass kept short and green to keep fire on the ground and more manageable by fire crews. If you're thinking of landscaping, ask your local nursery or OSU Extension agent about fire resistant plants.

Homeowners should also keep access in mind for large fire trucks. Long driveways should be at least 12 feet wide, have 10 feet of vegetation clearance from the centerline out, and about 14 feet overhead. Large vehicle turnaround areas are critical for your safety as well as firefighter safety.

It is the homeowners' responsibility to protect their homes by building defensible space. For more information, visit the websites for Keep Oregon Green, Oregon Department of Forestry, or call your nearest ODF or forest protective association office.

Arson arrest made on Stagegoach Fire

FIRES ON OREGON DEPT. OF FORESTRY-PROTECTED LANDS
Firefighters continued to make good progress Tuesday on the 330-acre Stagecoach Fire burning about eight miles northeast of Gilchrist on Bureau of Land Management and Walker Range Forest Protective Association lands. Containment remained at 10 percent due to some active fire behavior along the fireline and occasional torching within the fire perimeter. Fire activity picked up in the afternoon as pockets of unburned fuel ignited within the fire perimeter, and firefighters conducted small burnout operations.

More than 160 firefighters worked the fire Tuesday, mopping up hotspots and holding and improving the containment line. Resources included two hotshot crews, two Type 2 hand crews, 17 fire engines, two bulldozers, five water tenders and 22 miscellaneous management personnel. Residual smoke lingers as mop-up efforts continue.

The fire was determined to be human-caused. Two individuals illegally residing on Bureau of Land Management lands left a fire unattended. The Klamath County Sheriff’s Office arrested one suspect on charges of first-degree arson.

FIRES BURNING ON OTHER LANDS
The 45,491-acre Sunnyside Turnoff Fire burning on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation at Eagle Butte Lookout is 40 percent contained. More information is available at: http://nwccweb.us/information/fire_info.aspx



Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Stagecoach Road Fire lined at 300 acres

FIRES ON OREGON DEPT. OF FORESTRY-PROTECTED LANDS
The 300-acre Stagecoach Road Fire was reported mid-afternoon Monday burning on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Walker Range Forest Protective Association lands (WRPA) on the east side of Highway 97 about eight miles north of Gilchrist. Five air tankers (two ODF and three federal) dropped 20 loads of fire retardant on the fire. Two subdivisions were evacuated last evening and one structure, a cabin, was destroyed. The evacuation order was later lifted. The fire is now fully lined. It also burned about 20 acres of private lands in WRPA jurisdiction. The U.S. Forest Service’s Crescent Ranger District is the lead agency managing the fire.

FIRES BURNING ON OTHER LANDS
The 22,320-acre Sunnyside Turnoff Fire burning on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation at Eagle Butte Lookout is 20 percent contained. More information is available at: http://nwccweb.us/information/fire_info.aspx

Monday, July 22, 2013

Fire danger climbs to extreme in Wild & Scenic reach of Rogue River

The Southwest Oregon District announced today that the public-use fire danger level on ODF-protected lands in the Wild & Scenic section of the Rogue River will move up to "extreme" on July 24. No open fires of any kind will be allowed.

ODF protects the Wild & Scenic Section of the Rogue River between Grave Creek and Marial. The remainder of the section is protected by the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest.

The following regulations will go into effect Wednesday morning:

  • Smoking prohibited except in boats on the water, and on naturally vegetation-free gravel bars and sand bars below the river’s high-water mark.
  • Open fires prohibited, including campfires, charcoal fires, cooking fires and warming fires. Portable cooking stoves using liquefied or bottled fuels will be allowed on naturally vegetation-free gravel bars and sand bars below the high-water mark
  • Travelers must carry a shovel and bucket (one-gallon size).
  • Fireworks prohibited.
For further information about fire restrictions in all parts of the Wild and Scenic Section of the Rogue River, contact the Smullin Visitor Center located at the Rand National Historic Site, 541-479-3735.

For more information about ODF fire season regulations in the Southwest Oregon District, contact the unit office in your area:

  • Medford Unit, 5286 Table Rock Rd., Central Point. Phone: 541-664-3328
  • Grants Pass Unit, 5375 Monument Drive, Grants Pass. Phone: 541-474-3152
Southwest Oregon District fire precaution level information is also posted at: www.swofire.com.

Oregon Dept. of Forestry fire update - July 22, 2013

Fires on ODF-protected lands
The 500-acre Pacifica Fire reported Friday afternoon burning in Josephine County in the Southwest Oregon District was fully lined by Saturday morning. As ODF firefighters fought the fire, structural firefighters and engines were called in from across Jackson and Josephine counties, with additional help from fire departments in Lincoln, Linn, Lane and Marion counties, to protect 150 structures threatened by the flames. An Oregon State Fire Marshal’s incident management team managed the structural protection effort.

Fires on other lands
The 20,000-acre Sunnyside Turnoff Fire burning near Eagle Butte Lookout on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation is 20 percent contained. Eight additional hand crews have been ordered. Oregon Incident Management Team 4 will take over management of the fire at 6 p.m. this evening.

The 530-acre Cuba Fire burning 30 miles east of Joseph on the Idaho side of the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area is 75 percent contained. Full containment of the lightning-caused fire is expected by Tuesday.

Saturday, July 20, 2013

A Plea For Prevention

From Tom Fields
Fire Prevention Coordinator
Oregon Department of Forestry

We are currently facing extreme fire danger conditions in many areas of our great state. Human-caused fires are on the rise, putting human life and property in grave danger. Now is the time to act. Do your part to prevent future human-caused fires. Pay attention to local public use fire restrictions such as smoking, campfire use, off-road driving, debris burning, power saw use, and any other spark emitting activity that could lead to a wildfire. Remember, all fires start small. And with the combination of high temperatures, low humidity and wind, the smallest of fires can lead to large, catastrophic fires. Don’t be the problem, be the solution. Thank you for doing your part in Keeping Oregon Green and Safe.

500-acre Pacifica Fire in SW Oregon fully lined

Fire crews working evernight on the 500-acre Pacifica Fire, located near the community of Williams in Josephine County, completed a fireline around the perimeter, stabilizing the wildfire that broke out around 2:30 p.m. Friday. More than 150 structures were threatened by the fire, one home burned as did several outbuildings and vehicles.

The Oregon State Fire Marshal deployed an incident management team and out-of-area structural fire task forces to assist with providing additional structural protection this weekend.

More than 200 firefighters are working on the Pacifica Fire today and the fire camp is set up on the Pacifica property, located on Water Gap Rd. Firefighters plan on mopping up hot spots within 100 of the fireline and 100 feet around structures inside the burned area.

Roadblocks that were set up yesterday on the Williams Highway and Water Gap Rd. have been removed. However, non-residents are asked to avoid the fire area today as many fire engines and heavy equipment will be using the Williams Highway, Water Gap Rd. and Powell Creek Rd.

The cause of the fire is being investigated.

[Report provided by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry's Southwest Oregon District.]

Friday, July 19, 2013

Pacifica Fire threatens structures in SW Oregon

The approximately 150-acre Pacifica Fire burning in the Southwest Oregon District jumped Highway 238 at 2:45 p.m. on Friday, July 19, immediately threatening the towns of Williams and Provolt, located southwest of Medford. Some 150 structures are threatened. The fire is burning in timber and brush. Initial attack is underway by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry with assistance from local fire departments. The Oregon State Fire Marshal's Blue Team, a structural fire incident management team, has been dispatched to the site. Cause of the fire is under investigation.

Daily Fire Update for July 19, 2013

This is the Oregon Dept. of Forestry (ODF) fire update for July 19, 2013.

FIRES ON OREGON DEPT. OF FORESTRY-PROTECTED LANDS
Brookside Boulevard Fire
A fire that started Thursday afternoon in a community north of Grants Pass burned 31 acres and one structure. The Brookside Boulevard Fire in Merlin required more than 60 firefighters from the Oregon Department of Forestry and rural fire departments from Josephine and Jackson County. Firefighters were assisted by three helicopters, one air tanker, two bull dozers and 27 engines. The cause of the fire is under investigation.

Box Springs Fire
Expected containment for the Box Springs Fire is slated for this evening. The fire has burned 470 acres 25 miles northeast of Prineville. Oregon Department of Forestry’s Incident Management Team #3 (Dan Thorpe, Incident Commander) is expected to turn the fire over to ODF’s Central Oregon District Saturday morning.

FIRES BURNING ON OTHER LANDS
None reported in the last 24 hours.

FIRE WEATHER
Expect high pressure to continue over the region through Tuesday with generally sunny and dry weather. Temperatures are expected to range a bit above average inland from the coast and fire danger will continue to climb through midweek. The potential for a renewed round of thunderstorms next week will boost the risk of large fires considerably over Oregon.

Thursday, July 18, 2013

Daily Fire Update For July 18, 2013

This is the Oregon Dept. of Forestry (ODF) fire update for July 18, 2013.

FIRES ON OREGON DEPT. OF FORESTRY-PROTECTED LANDS
The Military Fire burned about 10 acres yesterday (07/17) along Hwy 97 about 45 miles north of Klamath Falls. Smoke from the fire caused a temporary closure of Hwy 97. By using pilot cars, Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) has been able to establish two-way traffic on U.S. Highway (hwy) 97 between milepost 218 and 220. ODOT hopes to have the highway fully opened sometime around 9 p.m. today. Fire crews from the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF), U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management worked in unison to contain the fire. The cause of the fire is under investigation.
Box Springs Fire
The Box Springs Fire 25 miles northeast of Prineville has been kept in check at 470 acres and is now 75% contained. Full containment is expected by tomorrow (07/19) evening. Oregon Department of Forestry’s Incident Management Team #3 (Dan Thorpe, Incident Commander) is managing the suppression effort. One challenge facing fire crews is the lack of water resources close to the fire. Water is being trucked in from long distances.

FIRES BURNING ON OTHER LANDS
None reported in the last 24 hours.

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Daily Fire Update for July 17, 2013

This is the Oregon Dept. of Forestry (ODF) fire update for July 17, 2013.
FIRES ON OREGON DEPT. OF FORESTRY-PROTECTED LANDS
No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported on ODF-protected lands in the past 24 hours.

Box Springs Fire
Crews are making significant progress on the Box Springs Fire 25 miles northeast of Prineville. The lightning-caused fire that started Sunday is estimated at about 500 acres and is 50% contained. Oregon Department of Forestry’s Incident Management Team #3 (Dan Thorpe, Incident Commander) is managing the suppression effort. The fire is completely lined and mop up activities have begun. Resources on the fire include 350 personnel, 3 helicopters, 9 engines, 5 water tenders and 3 bull dozers.

FIRES BURNING ON OTHER LANDS
None reported at this time.

FIRE WEATHER UPDATE
Widespread lightning received last 24hrs throughout Eastern Oregon and most of Washington. Low to moderate initial attack activity reported.

Box Springs Fire 50 percent contained, no growth

The 500-acres Box Springs Fire burning 25 miles northeast of Prineville in the Oregon Department of Forestry's Central Oregon District was stable Wednesday morning with no growth. The lightning-caused fire is fully lined and 50 percent contained. No smoke is visible in the area today.

The Department still has many firefighters continuing mop-up and asks the public to be cautious driving on forest roads due to firefighting traffic. Traffic is heaviest on Forest Service Road No. 27, with some traffic on McKay Road, also (pronounced 'muk-eye'). Firefighting vehicles will continue traveling back and forth to the fire for the next 2-3 days.

Lightning storms forecast for Tuesday evening didn't materialize, enabling firefighters to focus on the existing fire.

Most of the resources fighting the fire are ODF and private contract, along with some local USDA Forest Service resources.

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Box Springs Fire in central Oregon fully lined

The 500-acre Box Springs Fire burning 25 miles northeast of Prineville in the Central Oregon District was fully lined by the afternoon of July 16 and is 25 percent contained. An Oregon Department of Forestry fire team took over management of the lightning-caused fire this morning. Thunderstorm activity has been forecast for the area, and firefighters will keep a close watch tonight for any new lightning starts. The Box Springs Fire is burning on private forestlands.

Oregon Dept. of Forestry Daily Fire Update for July 16, 2013

This is the Oregon Dept. of Forestry (ODF) fire update for July 16, 2013.

FIRES ON OREGON DEPT. OF FORESTRY-PROTECTED LANDS

Box Springs Fire
The Oregon Department of Forestry mobilized Incident Management Team #3 Command and General Staff (Dan Thorpe Incident Commander) and a few key overhead positions, to the Box Springs Fire 25 miles northeast of Prineville. The lightning caused fire has burned about 500 acres with 5% containment. The fire sent smoke into the city of Prineville at about 5:00 p.m. last night. While visibility has improved today, the public is advised to heed caution when driving. A fire weather watch is in effect for much of Central Oregon for an increased threat of thunderstorms for Tuesday afternoon and overnight.

South Umpqua Road Fire
The South Umpqua Road Fire near Tiller burned about 25 acres of grass, brush and reprod. The Douglas Forest Protective Association responded to the fire yesterday afternoon and was assisted by Tiller Rural Fire Department, Umpqua National Forest and the Douglas County Sheriff’s office. About 50 firefighters are on scene today mopping up. The cause is under investigation.

Black Snag Spring Fire
The Black Snag Spring Fire in the John Day Unit within the Central Oregon District was downsized to 4 acres.


FIRES BURNING ON OTHER LANDS
None reported at this time.


FIRE WEATHER
Thunderstorms are expected to develop later today in Oregon gradually moving into eastern Washington tonight and Wednesday. This event will likely result in moderate IA activity and a realistic potential for several large fires. Breezy conditions are expected for both today and Wednesday which could result in an elevated spread potential for any ignitions. Currently a “High Risk” alert for large fires is in effect for a good portion of eastern Oregon but the condition is fluid and may be updated later this morning.


Monday, July 15, 2013

Oregon Dept. of Forestry (ODF) fire update for July 15, 2013

FIRES ON OREGON DEPT. OF FORESTRY-PROTECTED LANDS

The Black Snag Spring Fire was reported Saturday night burning in grass, brush and timber 11 miles southwest of Spray, OR, approximately 10 acres in size. The fire is 100 percent lined, two crews and an engine are still on the fire.

The Box Springs Fire was reported Sunday approximately 25 miles northeast of Prineville. The fire is approximately 120-acres, is burning in timber and brush, and is approximately 75 percent lined with some spots outside the line. The Central Oregon District is putting together a local Type 3 organization for this fire and has requested some misc. overhead and 4 engines from Salem Coordination Center.

The onset of drier and warmer weather has prompted some counties and districts to raise industrial fire precaution levels -- please be careful and help prevent wildland fires.

FIRES BURNING ON OTHER LANDS
The Sugar Creek Fire was reported Sunday night burning southeast of Prineville approximately 12 miles from Paulina near the Forest Service’s Sugar Creek Campground. The fire was wind-driven, burning in juniper and sage with single tree torching. Post Paulina RFPA and Miller Ranch responded and the fire is in mop up.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2013, through today:*
Lightning-caused fires: 52 fires burned 29 acres
Human-caused fires: 298 fires burned 1,160 acres
Total: 350 fires burned 1,189 acres

10-year average (Jan. 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 74 fires burned 4,370 acres
Human-caused fires: 245 fires burned 689 acres
Total: 318 fires burned 5,059 acres

Friday, July 12, 2013

Fire Update for July 12, 2013

FIRES ON OREGON DEPT. OF FORESTRY-PROTECTED LANDS

No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported on ODF-protected lands in the past 24 hours.
The onset of drier and warmer weather has prompted some counties and districts to raise industrial fire precaution levels -- please be careful and help prevent wildland fires.

Some ODF personnel are still currently assisting with firefighting in Alaska and Colorado. The Oregon Department of Forestry and its sister agencies in the other western states routinely share firefighting resources as needed. The arrangement is reciprocal: If ODF needs outside help on fires in Oregon, its partner agencies will provide personnel and equipment when possible.


FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2013, through today:*
Lightning-caused fires: 51 fires burned 19 acres
Human-caused fires: 281fires burned 1002 acres
Total: 332 fires burned 1,021 acres

10-year average (Jan. 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 66 fires burned 535 acres
Human-caused fires: 230 fires burned 663 acres
Total: 296 fires burned 1,198 acres

Thursday, July 11, 2013

ODF Fire Update for July 11, 2013

FIRES ON OREGON DEPT. OF FORESTRY-PROTECTED LANDS



No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported on ODF-protected lands in the past 24 hours.

Some ODF personnel are still currently assisting with firefighting in Alaska and Colorado. The Oregon Department of Forestry and its sister agencies in the other western states routinely share firefighting resources as needed. The arrangement is reciprocal: If ODF needs outside help on fires in Oregon, its partner agencies will provide personnel and equipment when possible.

The onset of drier and warmer weather has prompted some counties and districts to raise industrial fire precaution levels -- please be careful and help prevent wildland fires.


FIRE STATISTICS

Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2013, through today:*
Lightning-caused fires: 50 fires burned 19 acres
Human-caused fires: 276 fires burned 1001 acres
Total: 326 fires burned 1,020 acres

10-year average (Jan. 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 62 fires burned 529 acres
Human-caused fires: 225 fires burned 585 acres
Total: 287 fires burned 1,114 acres

Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Oregon Dept of Forestry fire update for July 9, 2013

FIRES ON OREGON DEPT. OF FORESTRY-PROTECTED LANDS

The 154-acre Stratton Creek Fire burning 11 miles northwest of Grants Pass was 100 percent contained by July 9. Five 20-person crews, two water tenders, one bulldozer and six type-6 engines will remain on the fire through the week to fall hazardous trees, improve lines where needed, continue mop-up and begin rehabilitation where needed. The fire was human-caused and is under investigation.

The 160-acre Bland Mountain Fire burning in the Douglas Forest Protective Association jurisdiction of the Southern Oregon Area is 100 percent contained and in mop-up with 4 crews and 1 engine still on scene. Cause is under investigation.

ODF personnel are currently fighting fires in Alaska and Colorado. The Oregon Department of Forestry and its sister agencies in the other western states routinely share firefighting resources as needed. The arrangement is reciprocal: If ODF needs outside help on fires in Oregon, its partner agencies will provide personnel and equipment when possible.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2013, through today:*
Lightning-caused fires: 51 fires burned 19 acres
Human-caused fires: 268 fires burned 987 acres
Total: 319 fires burned 1006 acres

10-year average (Jan. 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 55 fires burned 510 acres
Human-caused fires: 213 fires burned 535 acres
Total: 268 fires burned 1,045 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.

*When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

Monday, July 8, 2013

Stratton Creek Fire contained July 7

The 154-acre STRATTON CREEK FIRE burning 14 miles northwest of Grants Pass in the Southwest Oregon District was fully contained by the evening of July 7. At the peak of the suppression effort, resources on the fire included bulldozers, hand crews, and two heavy airtankers. The fire started in the Stratton Creek Ridge area between Stratton Creek Road and Hog Creek Road in heavy timber and steep terrain on public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management and eventually burned into public lands managed by Josephine County Forestry. Five 20-person hand crews, two water tenders, one bulldozer and six fire engines will remain on the fire through the week to fell hazardous trees, improve lines, continue mop-up and begin rehabilitation where needed. Cause is under investigation. The 125-acre BLAND MOUNTAIN FIRE burning in the Douglas Forest Protective Association jurisdiction of the Southern Oregon Area was lined and in mop-up by July 7. Cause is under investigation. Both fires were reported July 4.

Saturday, July 6, 2013

Bland Mountain Fire 90 percent contained

The 125-acre Bland Mountain Fire burning in the Douglas Forest Protective Association jurisdiction of southern Oregon was 90 percent contained by the morning of July 6. Mop-up continues on the fire, which is burning in timber and grass fuels.

The size of the Stratton Creek Fire burning in the Grants Pass Unit of the Southwest Oregon District has been revised downward to 175 acres due to more accurate mapping. On the morning of July 6 the fire continues to be active, burning in timber and other fuels. Cause is under investigation.

Friday, July 5, 2013

Stratton Creek Fire grows to 200 acres in SW Oregon District

The Stratton Creek Fire in the Grants Pass Unit of the Southwest Oregon District had grown to 200 acres by mid-morning July 5. The fire is currently uncontained. Cause is under investigation. The fire was reported July 4.

The 125-acre Bland Mountain Fire in the Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) jurisdiction of southern Oregon is 80 percent contained and in mop-up. Cause is under investigation. The fire was reported July 4.

The 2-acre Bear Creek Fire along Highway 42 South near Bandon caused the highway to be closed at the 2-1/2 mile marker due to visibility concerns from smoke. Coos Forest Protective Association is fighting the fire, with assistance from a DFPA helicopter. Coos County has mobilized a structural task force. The fire was reported July 5.

Thursday, July 4, 2013

Stratton, Bland Mtn. fires break out in southern Oregon July 4

Two new wildfires were reported Saturday afternoon in southern Oregon: The 75-acre Stratton Fire in the Southwest Oregon District's Grants Pass Unit and the 20-acre Bland Mountain Fire in the Douglas Forest Protective Association's jurisdiction.

The Bland Mountain Fire is burning in grass and timber and displaying active behavior. Initial attack is in progress. Cause is under investigation.

The Stratton Fire is burning in brush and timber and also active, pushed by winds up to 20 mph. Initial attack is in progress. Cause is under investigation.

Tuesday, July 2, 2013

ODF firefighters continue assistance to other western states

Sixty-seven Oregon Dept. of Forestry (ODF) personnel are currently fighting fires in other states. These include:

  • 62 in Alaska (includes ODF’s Incident Management Team 1)
  • 5 in Colorado
The Oregon Department of Forestry and its sister agencies in the other western states routinely share firefighting resources as needed. The arrangement is reciprocal: If ODF needs outside help on fires in Oregon, its partner agencies will provide personnel and equipment when possible.

NO NEW FIRES
No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported on the 16 million acres of private and public lands protected by ODF in the past 24 hours.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS
  • The 30,000-acre Owyhee Fire burning four miles west of Adrian on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands is uncontained. Cause: lightning.
  • The 2,800-acre Curry Canyon Fire burning five miles northwest of Juntura on BLM lands is fully contained. Cause: lightning.
  • The 12,000-acre Crooked Creek Complex Fire burning nine miles southwest of Rome on BLM lands is 25 percent contained. Cause: lightning.
  • The 550-acre Shumway Fire burning 12 miles southeast of Juntura on BLM lands is uncontained. Cause: lightning.

Monday, July 1, 2013

State Forester Doug Decker on the firefighting tragedy in Arizona

[Following is an excerpt from a message Oregon State Forester Doug Decker sent to Oregon Dept. of Forestry employees on July 1 regarding the recent tragedy in Arizona.]

By the nature of the profession, firefighters work side by side.

Today—side by side—we share our sorrow at yesterday’s loss of 19 firefighters, 18 of them members of a Hotshot crew, on Central Arizona’s Yarnell Hill Fire. This is one of the greatest tragedies in the history of wildland firefighting.

On behalf of the Department and Oregon’s broader wildland firefighting community, I have extended our thoughts and prayers to the families, co-workers and friends of these firefighters. Yesterday evening, I also offered Oregon’s ready support to Arizona State Forester Scott Hunt.

It will take time to establish exactly what led to this tragedy. This is a loud and clear statement that firefighting is serious business with the very highest of stakes. Protecting people, resources and property often means going into harm’s way. As we do this, we must keep safety and vigilance paramount.

These reminders are exactly on point for us at this moment. Our permanent and seasonal workforce is trained, in place, and putting out fires on a daily basis. Our Incident Management Team 1 is on assignment in Alaska, and several others of our staff are in Colorado and Arizona. The indicators point to a more-than-typically severe fire season in the West.

As the summer goes on, we, too, will encounter the most challenging of conditions: lightning, unpredictable winds, heavy fuels, and other conditions that demand our utmost attention to safety.

More broadly, we are in an era when weather and forest health conditions across much of the West suggest many challenging fire seasons ahead. However that future plays out, when all is done, our No. 1 priority is for everyone to return home safely.

There will be much more to come, as investigators sort through yesterday’s events, as memorial ceremonies are organized, and as the Yarnell Hill fire, which has destroyed a number of homes, continues to challenge firefighters.

Our fire protection work is vital to public health and safety, and to the protection of natural resources. It is widely appreciated. As you go about this difficult mission, I am counting on you to be safe.

Best,
Doug Decker

Comments and questions

The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

Cool, wet weather in the winter of 2016-17 ended Oregon's long drought and left a thick snowpack at higher elevations which will take some time to melt. However, even in non-drought years Oregon's warm, dry summers create conditions that allow for fire to start and spread. In an average summer firefighters still see almost a thousand fires on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.



What we do

Protection jurisdiction

The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. In total there are about 30.4 million acres of forest in Oregon.



Fire suppression policy

The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. While suppressing large fires can cost millions of dollars, economic and environmental damage from wildfires can be many times greater.





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About Me

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Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers in Salem, Ore., maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.