Lightning is largely absent from Oregon this week. However, warm, dry weather will greet the hundreds of thousands of visitors arriving to see the eclipse of the sun on Aug. 21. Avoiding activities that can spark a wildfire is key to making the eclipse a safe and pleasant experience for all. One measure adopted to reduce the risk of wildfire is a temporary ban, now in effect, on all campfires in state parks





Monday, June 9, 2014

June 9, 2014 Fire Update - Two Bulls Wildfire

The State Fire Marshal and Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center issued the following media release at 8 a.m. this morning:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, June 9, 2014
@TwoBullsFire @CentralORFire ‪#‎twobullsfire‬

Information Phone: 541-416-6811
Note: The info line number is expected to change today, please monitor social media for this update.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office has ordered Level III Evacuation Notices for the following areas:
• Skyliners Road area outside of the City of Bend (approximately 50 residences.)

Level II Evacuation Notices are in effect for the following areas:
• Area south of Shevlin Park, west of Mt. Washington, and north of Century Drive.
• Saddleback Subdivision on both sides of Johnson Road (lowered from Level III yesterday evening.)

Level I Evacuation Notices have been issued for the following areas:
• Remainder of Northwest Crossing (the area east of Mt. Washington Drive).
• Residents in the area north of Shevlin Park, west of Mt. Washington Drive.

Displaced residents in need of a place to stay or other resources are encouraged to report to the American Red Cross shelter located at High Desert Middle School located at 61111 27th Street. Red Cross information can also be obtained by calling 541-382-2142.

A livestock shelter has been opened at the Deschutes County Fairgrounds in Redmond, OR.

The following road closures remain in place: All of 4606, 1610, Skyline Forest, 4601, 4603, and Tumalo Falls.

CURRENT FIRE INFORMATION
Good progress was made both yesterday during the day and night with firefighters taking advantage of some calmer weather conditions. The priority of securing fireline around the eastern and southern portions of the fire was met and it is anticipated that hoselines will be put into place along that line by the end of today with some mop-up activities commencing there. Some of the available crews from the east flank divisions were reassigned to the western flank of the fire today to help in securing fireline on that portion. Structure protection task forces mobilized under the Oregon State Conflagration Act continue to work around the threatened structures and have contingency plans in place to help protect the watershed facilities if the fire jumps containment lines.

FACEBOOK: facebook.com/TwoBullsFire
TWITTER: @twobullsfire

Dry weather conditions will continue to keep temperatures in the upper 70’s and lower 80’s and relative humidity dipping below 20%. The main concern for today will be hold the lines on the southern portion of the fire and out of the City of Bend’s watershed, as winds are forecasted to get gusty from the northwest at 10-18 mph in the afternoon as a weak upper level disturbance moves over the area.
• 6,800 acres consisting of heavy brush and timber
• 250 homes threatened with 50 remaining under Level III Evacuation
• No structures lost or damaged
• No injuries
• Cause under investigation
• 5% containment
• 11 helicopters, 46 engines, 11 dozers, and 708 personnel assigned to the fire
• Estimated costs to date- $1.23 million Public Information Meeting
An informational meeting open to all public and media will be held Monday evening at 6:00 pm at Bend High School, located at 230 NE 6th St in Bend. Fire representatives will give a current and expected fire briefing and will be available to address questions and concerns.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
The fire is being managed under a unified command of Oregon Department of Forestry Incident Management Team 2 (Incident Commander, Chris Cline) and Oregon State Fire Marshal’s Green Team (Incident Commander, John Ingrao).

Cooperators working the incidents include Oregon Department of Forestry, Oregon State Fire Marshal’s Office, US Forest Service, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, City of Bend, American Red Cross, Bend-La Pine School District, and Cascade Timberlands LLC.

Interested media should report to the Incident Command Post located in the field across from 63685 Johnson Road. Public Information Officers will be available for interviews; media is required to check in with Information immediately upon arrival.

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The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

Cool, wet weather in the winter of 2016-17 ended Oregon's long drought and left a thick snowpack at higher elevations which will take some time to melt. However, even in non-drought years Oregon's warm, dry summers create conditions that allow for fire to start and spread. In an average summer firefighters still see almost a thousand fires on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.



What we do

Protection jurisdiction

The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state- and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. There are about 30.4 million total acres of forest in Oregon.



Fire suppression policy

The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. While suppressing large fires can cost millions of dollars, economic and environmental damage from wildfires can be many times greater.




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Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers in Salem, Ore., maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.