Current situation

Fire season on ODF-protected land has ended in most of Oregon as cooler temperatures, shorter days and moister conditions settle over much of the state. Exceptions are ODF-protected lands in the southern border counties of Jackson, Josephine, Klamath and Lake.






























Thursday, October 23, 2014

Fire season ends in NE Oregon - all ODF districts are out

[With the announcement today that the Northeast Oregon District has ended fire season, the entire state is now officially out. It was an active season. On the 16 million acres protected by ODF, 1,117 fires burned 51,198 acres. Compared to the 10-year average, that is 174 more fires and more than double the acreage burned.]  

News Release from the Oregon Dept. of Forestry, Oct. 23, 2014:

As of 12:01 p.m. on October 23, 2014, fire season was officially terminated for forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF), Northeast Oregon District. This includes private, state, county, municipal and tribal lands in seven counties: Union, Baker, Wallowa, Umatilla and small portions of Grant, Malheur and Morrow. Scattered rain showers throughout the district over the past few weeks, combined with cooler fall temperatures has reduced the fire danger.

However, John Buckman, Northeast Oregon District Forester, reminds the public to implement safe practices when using fire in the fall months.

"Fall is a good time to burn forest slash or yard debris, but please recognize that just one sunny and windy day can change conditions very quickly," he said. "Each fall we respond to escaped fires, so please continue to use fire in a responsible manner."

Technical advice for burning and smoke management can be obtained from your local ODF office.

With the termination of fire season, requirements such as providing firefighting equipment at logging sites or obtaining a burning permit for burn barrels are no longer in effect. However, termination of fire season does not relieve landowners or forest operators of lawful responsibilities concerning the safe burning of debris or slash. Windy conditions combined with warm weather could cause unpredictable fire behavior.

Specific Smoke Management/Burning Advisory Information:

- Unless you are in a rural or city fire department protection area, burn permits for burn barrels and small amounts of yard debris are not required. If you are under the protection of a rural or city fire department, please call and ask what their burning restrictions are. Burning within the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation requires a permit from the CTUIR. Follow all requirements within the permit.

- Burning of slash from forestry and logging activities requires a Notification of Operation/PDM from the Oregon Department of Forestry. In addition to this permit, the local Oregon Department of Forestry office must be contacted prior to ignition.

Before burning in northeast Oregon, it is important to check weather conditions related to smoke management. For smoke management forecasts call (541)963-9781 or visit the following website:
www.odf.state.or.us/DIVISIONS/protection/fire_protection/Daily/neo.htm.

- Slash Burns must be registered with the local Oregon Department of Forestry office at least seven days prior to burning and burning accomplishments reported within seven days after burning.

The Northeast Oregon District of the Oregon Department of Forestry would like to thank forest landowners, forest operators and the public for their efforts in fire prevention, detection and suppression activities this season. After back-to-back record fire seasons for the State of Oregon, the Northeast Oregon District was again able to keep acres burned below the 10-year average of 2,207 acres.

Firefighters in the district suppressed 105 fires, which burned just 1,038 acres. Additional resources such as helicopters, bulldozers and single-engine air tankers partially paid for with General Fund monies from the State of Oregon helped significantly to check fire spread quickly in a year in which there were numerous large fires burning throughout the state.

These additional resources were part of the coordinated effort employed by ODF, which also included rural fire departments, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Bureau of Indian Affairs, local contractors, landowners and a long-standing relationship with the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management.

For further information, contact the Oregon Department of Forestry at these local offices:

La Grande Unit (541) 963-3168
Baker City Sub-Unit (541) 523-5831
Wallowa Unit (541) 886-2881
Pendleton Unit (541) 276-3491

To report a fire, call 9-1-1.

Northeast Oregon District Wildfire Blog:
http://neodistrictfireblog.blogspot.com/
ODF on Twitter:
https://twitter.com/ORDeptForestry

Contact Info:
Christie Shaw, (541)886-2881, (541)263-0661
Jamie Knight, (541) 963-0195, (541)786-0501

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Comments and questions

The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

Cool, wet weather in the winter of 2016-17 ended Oregon's long drought and left a thick snowpack at higher elevations which will take some time to melt. However, even in non-drought years Oregon's warm, dry summers create conditions that allow for fire to start and spread. In an average summer firefighters still see almost a thousand fires on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.



What we do

Protection jurisdiction

The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. In total there are about 30.4 million acres of forest in Oregon.



Fire suppression policy

The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. While suppressing large fires can cost millions of dollars, economic and environmental damage from wildfires can be many times greater.





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Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers in Salem, Ore., maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.