All ODF fire protection districts are now in fire season. It's especially important in summer to avoid or be extra careful with any potential source of fire in wooded areas. Fire season means the end of most outdoor activities that are high risk for starting a fire, such as debris burning, campfires outside of designated areas, and using tracer ammunition and exploding targets.













Thursday, May 28, 2015

Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update for Thursday, May 28, 2015


This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) fire update for Thursday, May 28, 2015.

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
Southwest Oregon District – Grants Pass Unit.  A wildfire reported Wednesday, May 27, after 6:00 p.m., burned 10 acres on Granite Hill, north of the city of Grants Pass. Firefighters responded from Grants Pass Fire-Rescue, Rural Metro Fire Dept. and the Oregon Department of Forestry's Grants Pass Unit. Crews worked until after midnight to complete fireline and mop up hot spots around the fire's perimeter.  Today, a 20-man crew, two engines, and a water tender are being used to mop up hot spots throughout the burned area.  The cause of the fire is being investigated.  Unless something changes and other reports are necessary, this will be the only report on this fire.  For information on this and other fires on ODF-protected forestlands in southwest Oregon, visit the ODF Southwest Oregon Fire Blog at http://www.swofire.com/.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS
No new fires were reported burning on other lands in Oregon.

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through today:
Lightning-caused fires:  6 fires burned 3 acres
Human-caused fires: 103 fires burned 275 acres

Total: 109 fires burned 278 acres

10-year average (January 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 9 fires burned 5 acres

Human-caused fires: 82 fires burned 392 acres
Total: 91 fires burned 397 acres

Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.*

*When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office) or 503-931-2721 (Cell), any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon’s forests.

 

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

ODF Fire Update for Tuesday, May 26, 2015


This is the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) fire update for Tuesday, May 26, 2015.

 
FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS
Coos Forest Protective Association (CFPA).  On Monday, May 25, at approximately 1 p.m., the Sandy Creek Fire was reported burning in steep, rocky terrain, eight miles east of Bridge, OR, on forestlands protected by CFPA/ODF.  This afternoon, the fire was estimated at approximately 35 acres and is 60 percent lined.  The cause of the fire is under investigation.  More information is available in the news release regarding the Sandy Creek Fire issued today by CFPA and posted at
http://coosfpa.net/newsreleases.aspx.  Unless other updates are necessary, this will be the only report on this fire.

FIRES ON OTHER LANDS
No new fires were reported burning on other lands in Oregon.
FIRE INFORMATION DUTY OFFICER
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officer, who is currently Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office) or 503-931-2721 (Cell), any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon’s forests.

 
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Thursday, May 21, 2015

Enjoy a wildfire-free Memorial Day at home or in the forest

Some Oregonians enjoy the Memorial Day weekend at home, while others head to the forest. Whichever you choose, make it a wildfire-free holiday by following some basic safety tips.

If you’re going to the forest, check first to see if campfires are allowed at your destination. If they are, review the Keep Oregon Green Association’s checklist on the web, www.keeporegongreen.org/. It advises how to safely locate, maintain, and then extinguish your campfire.

If you’re staying home over the holiday, some yard work might figure in your plans. But, what to do with that pile of debris left over from pruning trees and trimming shrubs? If possible, chip or recycle it. But if burning is your only option, be careful. Already this spring, escaped debris burns have damaged property and incurred firefighting costs.

Again, the Keep Oregon Green website is a good place to go. Check out their tips on how to do backyard burning safely.

Friday, May 8, 2015

Peavine Creek Fire - final update

The Peavine Creek fire located about five miles north of Glendale was detected by Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) fire detection cameras at 5 p.m. on May 5.

Final fire size is 148 acres. There was no growth in the fire since the last update. The increase in acreage is due to more accurate GPS mapping of the fire.

The Peavine Creek fire was declared fully contained 7 p.m. Thursday, May 7.

Firefighters and industrial forestry representatives will remain on scene for several more days patrolling the fire trails and extinguishing hot spots within the interior of the fire.

DFPA will monitor the fire area throughout the summer to check for rekindling.

Cause of the Peavine Creek Fire remains under investigation. 

Thursday, May 7, 2015

Peavine Creek Fire, 123 acres, contained


On Wednesday evening, firefighters continued to strengthen containment lines around the Peavine Creek Fire north of Glendale in Douglas County. Higher humidity due to fog aided their efforts. Priority has now shifted from strengthening containment lines to mopping up hot spots. Firefighters will start from the outside of the fire and work in, with the goal of extinguishing 100 percent of the heat and smoke within the entire fire. On scene at the fire today are three hand crews, five water tenders, one bulldozer and various industrial forest landowner representatives.

Fire facts
 
  • Location: five miles north of Glendale
  • Reported: around 5 p.m. May 5
  • Situation: burning in heavy fuels on steep, rugged terrain
  • Size: about 123 acres
  • Status: 100 percent trailed with either dozer line or hand line
  • Cause: under investigation.
 
Contact:
Kyle Reed
Douglas Forest Protective Association
541-672-6507 x136 office
541-580-2789 mobile
 
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Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Peavine Creek Fire breaks out in Douglas County

May 6, 2015

Contact:
Kyle Reed
Douglas Forest Protective Association                                                               
(541) 672-6507 X 136              
(541) 580-2789  
kyle.reed@oregon.gov

The Peavine Creek Fire, located 5 miles north of Glendale, is estimated to be about 100 acres this morning. The fire, discovered Tuesday afternoon about 5 p.m. by DFPA’s fire detection cameras, damaged two pieces of logging equipment that were parked nearby.  The fire is burning on industrial timber lands. It is not threatening any homes. The cause is under investigation.

About 60 firefighters worked through the night Tuesday and made good progress on the fire, creating a fire trail around half of it. Wednesday’s goal is to complete the trail around the entire fire and begin the mop-up phase.

Working the fire today are three 20-person hand crews, two sets of cutters, five water tenders, a bulldozer, a fixed-wing observation aircraft, a helicopter, and various industrial representatives.


Comments and questions

The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

Cool, wet weather in the winter of 2016-17 ended Oregon's long drought and left a thick snowpack at higher elevations which will take some time to melt. However, even in non-drought years Oregon's warm, dry summers create conditions that allow for fire to start and spread. In an average summer firefighters still see almost a thousand fires on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.



What we do

Protection jurisdiction

The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state- and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. There are about 30.4 million total acres of forest in Oregon.



Fire suppression policy

The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. While suppressing large fires can cost millions of dollars, economic and environmental damage from wildfires can be many times greater.




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About Me

My photo
Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers in Salem, Ore., maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.