Current situation

Fire season on ODF-protected land has officially ended in all of Oregon as cooler temperatures and moister conditions settle over much of the state. This late in the fall, a key source of ignitions is fire escaping when piles of woody debris are burned. Care is required with that activity at any time of year.
































Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Fire Update - Tuesday, August 18, 2015

We’ve changed the look, length and frequency of ODF Daily Fire Updates. Starting today, the Daily Fire Update will provide a high-level snapshot of Oregon fire activity, pointing to additional resources and contact information. The ODF Fire Blog will become home for all updates from individual fires and other-fire related information. Please bookmark the blog page for quick reference. Please also find ODF on Facebook and Twitter for regular updates and stories from the front lines.

URGENT FIRE PREVENTION MESSAGE
“Your help is critical in preventing the next wildfire.”  With resources stretched thin and more than 300,000 acres burning in Oregon alone, State Forester Doug Decker calls on Oregonians to keep the next fire from starting.  See the video at


 FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

ODF Central Oregon District – John Day Unit:  The lightning-caused Canyon Creek Complex, started August 12, is burning one mile south of John Day and Canyon City.  The complex is approximately 43,738 acres and 0 percent contained.  Evacuation notices have been issued for this fire at all levels, which has destroyed and continues to threaten primary residences in the fire’s area, and an area closure is in effect.  A community meeting will be held tonight at 5:00 p.m. [note the updated time] at the Grant Union High School’s old gym.  This is the top priority fire in the nation for resources, with additional firefighting resources continuing to arrive from around the state and country, and approximately 561 firefighters currently assigned.  The fire is being managed under Unified Command by the Great Basin Incident Management Team 1 (Incident Commander Lund) and the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal Red Team (Incident Commander Walker).

More Information:
Joint Information Center: 541-575-3040
www.fs.usda.gov/malheur
https://twitter.com/MalheurNF
#canyoncreekcomplex
canyoncreekcomplex@gmail.com


Northeast Oregon District – Baker Sub-Unit:  The Eldorado Fire, burning approximately 8 miles southeast of Unity on ODF-protected private lands, Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and Wallowa-Whitman National Forest lands, is estimated at 20,500 acres and 30 percent contained.  ODF Incident Management Team 3 (Incident Commander Smith) assumed command of the fire on August 15.  This morning, all evacuation notices for the fire area have been updated to Level 1 [Get Ready].  Today, 285 personnel are assigned to this fire.  The cause remains under investigation.

More information:
Baker County, Oregon Joint Information Center (JIC):  541-523-2905

ODF Northeast Oregon District – Baker Sub-Unit: The lightning-caused Cornet-Windy Ridge Complex, which started on August 10, is burning 10 miles east of Unity, and approximately 99,270 acres and 35 percent contained.  The fire is burning on ODF-protected lands, and U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management lands.  Area and road closures remain in effect on this fire, and evacuation notices at all levels have been issued for this fire which threatens and has destroyed structures.  Approximately 628 personnel are assigned to this fire which is being managed under Unified Command by the Southwest Incident Management Team (Incident Commander Ruggiero) and the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal Green Team (Incident Commander Kunze).

More Information:
Baker County, Oregon Joint Information Center: 541-523-2905
bakerjointinfo@gmail.com
http://inciweb/nwcg.gov/incident/4478/
https://www.facebook.com/CornetFire

ODF Northeast Oregon District – Baker Sub-Unit:  The lightning-caused Eagle Complex, which comprises three fires burning approximately 20 miles northwest of Richland (16 miles northeast of Baker city), is approximately 2,518 acres and 0 percent contained.  This complex, burning on ODF-protected lands and the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, is being managed by the Rocky Mountain Interagency Team Black (Incident Commander Greer). 

More information:
Baker City Joint Information Center (JIC): (541) 523-2905
bakerjointinfo@gmail.com
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4481/
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Rocky-Mountain-Area-Incident-Management-Team-Black/341078999367545

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA):  The Stouts Fire, reported July 30, burning 11 miles east of Canyonville near Milo, is 25,076 acres and 72 percent contained.  Today the fire released resources – personnel and equipment – to assist with other fires burning in Oregon; currently 1,030 personnel remain on this fire.   Approximately 48 percent of the fire has burned on ODF-protected forestlands (private lands and BLM), and about 52 percent on the Umpqua National Forest. The fire is under joint command of ODF Incident Management Team 2 (Incident Commander Chris Cline) and the U.S. Forest Service (Incident Commander Mike Wilde).  The fire has been determined to be human-caused.   

More information:
Phone:  541-825-3724
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/
www.facebook.com/StoutsFire 
https://twitter.com/StoutsFire                                                                    
#StoutsFire

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA):  The Cable Crossing Fire remains at 1,857 acres and 90 percent contained.  Today, about 50 firefighters remain assigned to the fire, which is in mop-up status.

More information:
Phone: 541-817-7186
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4424/
www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation
www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA

WILDFIRES AND ROAD AND HIGHWAY SAFETY, DELAYS, AND CLOSURES
Wildfires can affect the status of Oregon’s roads, including State Highways.  Firefighting equipment may be in the area – either on the roadways or in the air above.  Smoke may appear suddenly, making travel hazardous.  Use caution when driving in the area of any wildfire, traveling at a safe and appropriate speed for the conditions, but do not slow down or stop to watch firefighting operations.  And, always, for the latest information on state roads and highways relating to delays and closures, visit www.tripcheck.com.

EVACUATIONS - READY, SET, GO!
Be aware that evacuation levels can change rapidly based on unexpected growth from fire behavior.

  • LEVEL ONE – GET READY!  Be Prepared. Residents should be aware of the danger that exists in their area and monitor websites, social media, and local media outlets for information.
  • LEVEL TWO – GET SET!  Be Set. This indicates that there is significant danger to your area, and residents should be ready to evacuate at a moment’s notice.
  • LEVEL THREE - GO! Leave Immediately. Danger to your area is current or imminent, and you should evacuate immediately.
If, at any time, no matter what the level, you feel threatened by fire, do not wait for someone to tell you that it is time to evacuate, just go.  For more information on the READY, SET, GO! Evacuation Levels system, visit www.wildlandfirersg.org/.

 WILDFIRE SMOKE
Smoke may persist where wildfires are burning in in Oregon, including times when burn-out firefighting operations are taking place. Stay up-to-date on smoke density and public health advisories, or view and monitor Oregon’s air quality index.  Wildfires and severe smoke can create dangerous conditions for people, especially those with chronic health conditions. Learn what you can do to reduce the risk of health effects of wildfire smoke.

 FIRE STATISTICS*
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2015, through today:*
Lightning-caused fires:  249 fires burned 2710 acres
Human-caused fires: 543 fires burned 27,048 acres
Total: 792 fires burned 29,758 acres

10-year average (January 1 through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 237 fires burned 21,523 acres

Human-caused fires: 429 fires burned 3,308 acres
Total: 666 fires burned 24,831 acres

 Fire statistics can be accessed any time from the ODF website.*

*When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

 NEWS MEDIA
News media may call the Fire Information Duty Officers, who are currently Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office) or 503-931-2721 (Cell), and Rod Nichols, 503-945-7425 (office) or 503-508-0574 (Cell), any time for fire information. If the duty officer is unable to take your call, you can expect a prompt return call. Media may also call the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters office, 503-945-7200, weekdays during business hours.

 OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
For information on Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands view:
ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland. The department also provides fire protection on some other lands, including U.S. Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Forestry works closely with neighbors and partner agencies to support the firefighting efforts on major fires outside its authority because sharing firefighting resources can help better protect all of Oregon’s forests.

OTHER LINKS
Fire weather
Wildfire smoke forecasts

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Have a question/comment about this season's wildfire activity on the 16 million acres of private and public forestlands that the Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects from wildfire? Let us know. Please keep your remarks civil and free of profanity.

Comments and questions

The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

Cool, wet weather in the winter of 2016-17 ended Oregon's long drought and left a thick snowpack at higher elevations which will take some time to melt. However, in the summer of 2017 a series of heatwaves and a prolonged stretch of dry weather created conditions that dried forest fuels, allowing fires to start and spread. The result was more than a thousand fires on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Ninety-five percent of these were put out at less than 10 acres.






What we do

Protection jurisdiction

The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. In total there are about 30.4 million acres of forest in Oregon.



Fire suppression policy

The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. While suppressing large fires can cost millions of dollars, economic and environmental damage from wildfires can be many times greater.





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About Me

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Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers in Salem, Ore., maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.