Current situation

Fire season on ODF-protected land has officially ended in all of Oregon as cooler temperatures and moister conditions settle over much of the state. This late in the fall, a key source of ignitions is fire escaping when piles of woody debris are burned. Care is required with that activity at any time of year.
































Saturday, August 1, 2015

Stouts Fire Morning Update – August 1, 2015


Contact: Brian Ballou (541) 621-4156

“This is a tough fire,” ODF Team 1 Incident Commander John Buckman explained this morning. “Because of the challenging terrain and abundant, dry fuel – large standing and downed trees – we have difficult work ahead to suppress this fire but I know these crews can do it.”

Facing difficult weather – historically high temperatures and low relative humidity – and quick growth to about 8,500 acres since its start July 30. The drought created unusually dry forests prone to fast-spreading fires. Between yesterday and last night the fire grew 2,000 acres to the south and east.

The combined structural and wildland firefighting team of over 800 firefighters will split responsibilities based on their expertise. The Oregon State Fire Marshal (OSFM) Green Team’s and ODF Team I are operating under a “unified command” to coordinate the structural and wildland firefighting efforts. While the city or structural firefighters work with homeowners to help prevent harm to their homes if the fire reaches them, the wildland firefighters will continue working to contain the fire to prevent the fire from spreading to the neighborhoods.

 “The Douglas Forest Protective Association and the Umpqua National Forest gave us specific direction to suppress the fire and be safe,” said OSFM Green Team’s Incident Commander Ted Kunze. “It’s great to see the teams partnering with the communities to protect our forests and the people living near them.”

Yesterday, the Douglas County Sheriff's Office issued a Level 3 (Go) evacuation for residents in the Azalea area from Upper Cow Creek to Snow Creek East. There is a Level 2 (Set) evacuation for residents near the Galesville Dam up to Snow Creek. For the residents on Ferguson Lane, Stouts Creek, and Conley Lane - the level of evacuation was reduced to Level 2. The Red Cross set up an evacuation shelter at the Canyonville YMCA. Fire managers and structure protection teams continue evaluating the wildland-urban interface zones and preparing the areas to help blunt the fire if it reaches these areas. This includes the Milo, Tiller, Azalea, and Crew communities, in addition to the homes under Level II and III evacuations.

Governor Kate Brown invoked the Conflagration Act to bring structural firefighters in from around the state to help protect the neighborhoods close to the fire. The OSFM Office quickly mobilized statewide resources including task force teams from Clackamas, Lane, Linn/Benton, Lincoln, Marion and Yamhill counties to work with the Green Team.

More Information: (541) 621-4156 (7 a.m. to 9 p.m.)     #StoutsFire       StoutsFire@gmail.com http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/                                                    www.dfpa.net                           
www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry                                    www.twitter.com/ORDeptForestry
www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation                       www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA

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Comments and questions

The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

Cool, wet weather in the winter of 2016-17 ended Oregon's long drought and left a thick snowpack at higher elevations which will take some time to melt. However, in the summer of 2017 a series of heatwaves and a prolonged stretch of dry weather created conditions that dried forest fuels, allowing fires to start and spread. The result was more than a thousand fires on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Ninety-five percent of these were put out at less than 10 acres.






What we do

Protection jurisdiction

The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. In total there are about 30.4 million acres of forest in Oregon.



Fire suppression policy

The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. While suppressing large fires can cost millions of dollars, economic and environmental damage from wildfires can be many times greater.





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Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers in Salem, Ore., maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.