Current situation

Winter and spring see lots of controlled burns in Oregon to eliminate piles of woody debris left over after logging or thinning. Embers buried in the ashes of these pile burns can sometimes reignite even days after a fire appears to be out, especially if winds blow away ashy debris. The same winds can then fan smoldering embers back to life. That's why it's a good idea to keep checking old pile burns to ensure no hot spots have rekindled.


































Friday, September 4, 2015

Oregon Dept. of Forestry fire update - 09-04-15

CONTACT:
Fire Information Duty Officer: Jeri Chase, 503-945-7201 (office) or 503-931-2721 (Cell).

Note: No fire updates will be issued on Saturday, Sunday, or Monday unless the situation necessitates doing so. Have a great and wildfire-safe holiday week-end.

FIRE FACTS

ODF Central Oregon District - John Day Unit: The lighting-caused Canyon Creek Complex, started on August 12 and located one mile south of John Day and Canyon City, is at 109,876 acres (17,040 ODF-protected acres) and 66 percent contained. The complex, which destroyed 44 primary residences, has 951 personnel assigned and is under Unified Command of the Great Basin Incident Management Team 1 (IC Lund) and the Oregon State Fire Marshal Red Team (IC Walker).
More Information: 541-820-3643 or 541-820-3633 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4495/ | www.facebook.com/CanyonCreekFireOregon | www.twitter.com/canyoncreekfire | #canyoncreekcomplex |

ODF Northeast Oregon District - Wallowa Unit: The lightning-caused Grizzly Bear Complex, started on August 13, 20 miles southeast of Dayton, WA and near Troy, OR, is 74,709 acres (10,107 of ODF-protected acreage, including 3,299 acres of Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife lands) and 27 percent contained. The complex, which destroyed five primary residences (33 total structures), has 1,116 personnel assigned and is being managed by Washington Incident Management Team 4 (IC Gales).
More Information: 541-437-0138 | http://inciweb.nwcg.giv/incident/4511 | www.facebook.com/pages/Grizzly-Bear-Complex-Fire/1152633018086248 | www.twitter.com/2015grizzlyfire | www.bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com | #grizzlybearcomplex

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA): The human-caused Stouts Fire, started on July 30, 11 miles east of Canyonville, remains at 26,452 acres (11,239 ODF-protected acres) and today is 98 percent contained. The fire has 247 personnel assigned and is being managed by a smaller fire management organization (Florida Forest Service Type 3 - IC Mike Work).
More information: 541-825-3724 or 206-402-7175 | http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/ | www.facebook.com/StoutsFire www://twitter.com/StoutsFire | www.flickr.com/photos/stoutsfirephotos | #stoutsfire |

OTHER FIRE INFORMATION
For information on wildfires on all jurisdictions in Oregon, view:
* the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center website, or
* the national Incident Information System site.

Online and social media resources:
* department's web site
* department's blog for news on wildfires statewide and provides current fire statistics.
* Southwest Oregon District blog with district specific wildfire info, and follow the Twitter feed covering fires as they occur.
* Douglas Forest Protective Association website, Facebook Page and Twitter feed.
* Blue Mountain Interagency Wildfire blog for news on wildfires in the Blue Mountains (northeast Oregon)
* ODF Forest Grove District's Fire blog with district-specific wildfire information
* ODF Central Oregon District's Twitter feed
* Keep Oregon Green website, Facebook page and Twitter feed

OTHER INFORMATION
* ODOT Tripcheck
* Evacuation - Ready, Set, Go!
* Wildfire Smoke

FIRE STATISTICS
Fire statistics can be accessed from the ODF Wildfire Blog and the ODF website. When personnel are heavily engaged in firefighting activities, the latest information may not always appear in the statistics.

ABOUT THIS UPDATE
This update provides information primarily about fires on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands involving fires 10 acres or larger. ODF provides fire protection primarily on private and state-owned forestland, and Bureau of Land Management forestlands west of the Cascades, and also works closely with partner firefighting agencies.

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Comments and questions

The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

Cool, wet weather in the winter of 2016-17 ended Oregon's long drought and left a thick snowpack at higher elevations which will take some time to melt. However, in the summer of 2017 a series of heatwaves and a prolonged stretch of dry weather created conditions that dried forest fuels, allowing fires to start and spread. The result was more than a thousand fires on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Ninety-five percent of these were put out at less than 10 acres.






What we do

Protection jurisdiction

The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. In total there are about 30.4 million acres of forest in Oregon.



Fire suppression policy

The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. While suppressing large fires can cost millions of dollars, economic and environmental damage from wildfires can be many times greater.





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About Me

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Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers in Salem, Ore., maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.