With most of the state having gone five to six weeks without significant rain, many ODF districts have increased the fire danger level to high. When fire danger is high, outdoor activities that are high risk for starting a fire are typically banned in or near forestland, such as debris burning, campfires outside of designated areas, and using tracer ammunition and exploding targets.














Thursday, June 30, 2016

Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update | Thursday, June 30, 2016

FIRE PREVENTION REMINDER:Public Use Restrictions are being implemented / increasing on various ODF districts throughout the state, often including restrictions on fireworks on ODF-protected lands.  Be sure to know what restrictions are in place where you are working or recreating.  Enjoy celebrating our nation's 240th birthday during the upcoming holiday week-end, but please be safe out there.


NEW FIRES (10 acres or larger reported on ODF-protected lands over the past 24 hours):

Ferguson Creek Fire (Western Lane District): The Ferguson Creek Fire was reported on Wednesday, June 29, burning approximately six miles southwest of Monroe.  By that late afternoon / early evening, the fire was controlled at 25 acres. Cause of the fire is under investigation. Unless the situation changes, this will be the only report on this fire.

No other fires 10 acres in size or larger were reported yesterday on ODF-protected lands.

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

DFPA tightens fire restrictions July 1

Due to the continued hot and dry weather, the Douglas Forest Protective Association will impose a “Regulated Use Closure” effective 12:01 a.m. Friday, July 1. The Public Fire Restrictions will be in effect on all 1.6 million acres of private, county, state and Bureau of Land Management lands protected by DFPA. The Industrial Fire Precaution level (IFPL) will remain at Level 1 for the Douglas District.

Under DFPA’s Public Fire Restrictions, the following provisions are set to help prevent wildfires:

·         Smoking is prohibited while traveling, except in vehicles on improved roads, in boats on the water, and at other designated locations.
·         Open fires are prohibited, including campfires, charcoal fires, cooking fires and warming fires, except at designated locations. Portable cooking stoves using liquefied or bottled fuels are allowed. DFPA’s designated campgrounds include:
  • BLM Campgrounds: Cavitt Creek, Eagle View, Lone Pine, Millpond, Rock Creek, Susan Creek and Tyee.
  • Douglas County Parks Campgrounds: Amacher Park, Douglas County Fairgrounds, Pass Creek, Stanton Park, Chief Miwaleta and Whistler’s Bend.
·         The use of fireworks is prohibited.
·         Motor vehicles, including motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles, are only allowed on improved roads free of flammable vegetation, except for the culture and harvest of agricultural crops. In addition, each vehicle traveling on forest roads must have a shovel and one gallon of water or one operational 2-½ lb. or larger fire extinguisher. All-terrain vehicles and motorcycles must be equipped with one operational 2-½ lb.or larger fire extinguisher.

·         Electric fence controllers must be approved by a nationally recognized testing laboratory or be certified by the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services, and be installed and used in compliance with the fence controller’s instructions for fire safe operation.
·         Chainsaws may not be used between 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. During other hours, chainsaw users must have a shovel and an 8-oz. or larger fire extinguisher at the job site, and a one-hour fire watch is required after the saw is shut down.
·         Mowing of dead or dry grass with power-driven equipment will not be allowed between 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. This restriction does not include mowing of green lawns, or equipment used for the commercial culture and harvest of agricultural crops.
·         The cutting, grinding or welding of metal will not be allowed between 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. These activities will be allowed during other hours provided the work site is cleared of potentially flammable vegetation and other materials, and a water supply is at the job site.
In addition to DFPA’s Public Fire Restrictions, the following activities are prohibited under ORS 477.512 during a declared fire season:
·         The use of exploding targets
·         The use of sky lanterns
·         The use of tracer ammunition or any bullet with a pyrotechnic charge in its base.

In addition to DFPA’s Public Fire Restrictions, private industrial landowners have the ability to add additional restrictions or complete closures to their land holdings throughout the summer due to the fire danger. Recreational forest users are advised to check with the landowners for the locations they plan to recreate on before heading to the woods.

For more information about public or industrial fire restrictions on DFPA protected land, call DFPA’s 24-hour information line at 541-672-0379 or visit www.dfpa.net

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Sunday, June 26, 2016

Fire Update - June 26, 2016

Jewel Road Fire Burns 31 Acres in Central Oregon

The Jewel Road Fire was reported Saturday at 4:30 p.m. burning in grass and brush on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands west of Dufur in central Oregon. Fire-fighting resources from ODF’s Central Oregon District and several cooperators stopped the fire’s spread at 31 acres.

A single-engine air tanker on contract with the Washington Department of Natural Resources flew from Dallesport, Wash., and dropped one load of retardant and three loads of water onto the fire. ODF responded with four engines and a bulldozer, and four additional engines were supplied by the U.S. Forest Service and a rural structural protection district.

The fire burned on rolling hills through grass and brush beneath an overstory of pine and oak trees, and was contained by 11:00 p.m. The engine crews were released from the fire by midnight.

Today, four engines and a five-person crew are patrolling the Jewel Road Fire and extinguishing remaining hot spots.

The cause of the Jewel Road Fire is under investigation.

No other fires 10 acres in size or larger were reported yesterday on ODF-protected lands.

Thursday, June 23, 2016

War Canyon Fire Burns 20 Acres East of Long Creek

The War Canyon Fire was reported around 12:30 PM Wednesday burning in grass and brush on ODF-protected lands two miles east of Long Creek, Ore. Oregon Department of Forestry fire-fighting resources from the Central Oregon District’s John Day Unit were assisted by firefighters from the Long Creek Rural Fire Department. Firefighters stopped the fire spread at approximately 20 acres.

ODF resources on scene included four engines, a four-person hand crew, and the incident commander. Firefighting personnel will continue the mop-up process today to extinguish heat within the fire perimeter.

The cause of the War Canyon Fire is under investigation.

No other fires 10 acres in size or larger were reported yesterday on ODF-protected lands.

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Fire Update - June 21, 2016


Update: Early season wildfire burns nearly 100 acres

A wildfire ignited Monday afternoon burning approximately 100 acres, five miles west of The Dalles in the Central Oregon District.
Courtesy: ODF Central Oregon District
It was originally reported by crews that the fire was roughly 45 acres; however, remapping has shown the wildfire is larger. This is not due to fire growth, but better measurement.
 
The Chenoweth Fire began around 5:20 p.m. on state-protected land and burned through the night before crews could extinguish all visible flames.
Alongside the crews from the Oregon Department of Forestry, a private contractor, Steelhead Enterprises, pitched in fighting this fire.
Firefighters will continue to strengthen the trails creating a containment buffer. The fire is contained. Fire crews will work on hot spots the rest of the day.
The cause of the fire is currently under investigation.
 
--
 
As we head into this week, the Fire Danger Level is Low to Moderate throughout the state.
The Fire Forecast shows windy, dry weather will last for one more day throughout several regions. But temperatures look to remain around average as more showers are anticipated in the middle of the week. Summer weather is expected to return this weekend. It’s a reminder to know the changing conditions before enjoying the outdoors!

Monday, June 20, 2016

Break from wildfire activity may be coming to an end

The mild weather over the past several days has given firefighters a break. But summer officially arrived June 19, and a seasonal warming and drying trend now underway is expected to increase the potential for new fire starts. It's a great time of year to enjoy Oregon's forests, but please practice fire safety as you recreate.

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Akawana Fire - final update, June 15, 2016

Christie Shaw
Public Information Officer
541-263-0661
Christie.shaw@oregon.gov

Mop-up operations for the 2,094 acre Akawana Fire are nearly complete. The fire is now 95 percent contained, with a 500-foot cold black line around most of the perimeter. Smoke may continue to be visible from material burning in the interior of the fire for several weeks. Cool, moist weather throughout central Oregon has aided firefighters during the mop-up activities, and reduced interior fire activity. Firefighters experienced scattered showers over some parts of the fire today, and the weather forecast calls for additional precipitation over the next few days.

The Type 3 Team, led by Incident Commander Rob Pentzer, will transfer command of the fire back to ODF’s Central Oregon District Thursday morning. A 10-person hand crew from the district will continue to patrol the fire, extinguishing any smoke or flames within the 500-foot perimeter on Thursday. District personnel will continue to monitor the fire and provide regular patrols throughout fire season.

The Emergency Area Closure implemented for public safety near the fire for the Deschutes and Ochoco National Forests and Crooked River Grassland was lifted June 14, 2016, at 6 a.m. The public is asked to keep clear of firefighting activities, including mop-up operations and patrols within the Akawana Fire perimeter. 

While the weather may be in a cooling trend with scattered moisture, it is still fire season in the Central Oregon District. Burning is allowed by permit only. Please contact your local ODF office for further information. Exploding targets and tracer ammunition are prohibited during fire season, as well as sky lanterns.
This will be the final news release for the Akawana Fire. Please direct questions or requests for information to Christie Shaw (541-263-0661), Information Officer for the Central Oregon District.  For more information on ODF’s Central Oregon District visit www.ODFcentraloregon.com.

###

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Fire update - June 15, 2016

No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported in the past 24 hours on Oregon Dept. of Forestry-protected lands. While weather conditions have muted wildfire activity, the transition to summer is underway and with it a rise in fire danger. Enjoy Oregon's forests but please be "fire aware" as you recreate.
 
FIRE FACTS 
Akawana Fire -  On Tuesday firefighters continued mop-up activities within the fire perimeter, working to extinguish flames and smoke within 500 feet of the fire line. Most of the work is complete, But smoke may be visible from smoldering stumps or burning material well within the fire perimeter. Crews also worked hard to remove the remaining fire hose from the fire line. 
 
Mop-up will continue today. The fire is now 90 percent contained at 2,094 acres burned. The lightning-caused Akawana Fire was reported June 7 burning north of Sisters in ODF's Central Oregon District.. Recent conditions have muted fire activity. But the seasonal transition is underway and with it warm, dry weather that will increase wildfire activity. Please be "fire aware" as you recreate in the forest.

The Northwest Preparedness Level has been lowered to 1, effective June 15, 2016. Among other things PL-1 means that the potential for emerging significant wildland fires is expected to remain minimal.

###

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Fire update - June 14, 2016

No new fires 10 acres or larger were reported in the past 24 hours on Oregon Dept. of Forestry-protected lands. Cooler weather with rain in some parts of the state have moderated wildfire conditions. But fire danger will rise with the return of warm, dry weather. Please be fire safety-conscious in the forest.

Monday, June 13, 2016

Akawana Fire final update - June 13, 2016

Oregon Department of Forestry
Incident Management Team 3
Link Smith, Incident Commander

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4772
 
Note: This will be the final update from this team.

Sisters, OR –  The Oregon Department of Forestry’s Type 1 Incident Management Team, led by Incident Commander Link Smith, will hand the fire over to a smaller Type 3 organization tomorrow. The Team would like to thank the Sisters, Three Rivers and Grandview communities for their kind hospitality and support during its stay.
The size of the fire remains 2,094 acres, and it is now 80 percent contained.

While fire crews have reached at least 300 feet into the fire from the perimeter with mop-up operations, residents may see smoke for several days from burning stumps and snags well within containment lines.

The Type 3 Team in place for the next few days is made up of about 140 firefighters and support staff. Equipment assigned to the fire with this team will include three fire engines, four water tenders, two bulldozers, three skidgines and one helicopter. The fire camp will be moved to ODF’s Sisters sub-unit office.

Now that the smoke has cleared over the Akawana Fire, residents should continue to treat fire season with respect. Everyone is encouraged to follow current fire season restrictions to prevent human-caused fires.

In addition, residents of the wildland-urban interface, where communities border forests and grazing lands, should always be prepared before fire threatens communities. Have a plan that includes making arrangements for persons with special needs, livestock and pets. Learn more about the Ready Set Go Program at www.wildlandfirersg.org/

To stay up to date on fire information in central Oregon, please follow Oregon Department of Forestry’s Central Oregon District on Facebook. Other valuable resources include www.inciweb.nwcg.gov, www.oregon.gov/odf, www.keeporegongreen.org and www.airnow.gov.

The incident management team would also like to recognize and thank all cooperating agencies that assisted us in the complete and coordinated fire protection system on this fire. Agencies and partners included the Oregon State Fire Marshal’s Office and responding structural task forces from around the state, Lake Chinook Fire District, the Central Oregon Fire Management Service, Crooked River National Grasslands, PGE/Warms Springs Tribes Land Ownership, U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and Jefferson and Deschutes County Emergency Management.

###

Sunday, June 12, 2016

Akawana Fire update - June 12, 2016 evening

Oregon Department of Forestry
Incident Management Team 3
Link Smith, Incident Commander

Information:
www.facebook.com/odfcentraloregon
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4772

Type of Incident: Wildfire
Cause: Lightning
Date of Origin: June 7, 2016
Location: Akawana Butte, 13 miles North of Sisters
Types of Fuel: Grass, Brush and Timber
Structures Threatened: 0
Structures Damaged: 0
Residences Destroyed: 0
Current Size: 2,094 acres
Percent Containment: 80%
Number of Personnel: 537
Hand Crews: 21
Engines 16
Dozers 5
Water Tenders 11
Skidgines 5 (track equipment with a water tank and pump)
Helicopters 6

Note: It was another great day on the fireline. Firefighters continued aggressive mop-up, making sure that this fire will not reignite and flare up later this summer. No additional growth has occurred in the last operational period. The size remains 2,094 acres and is now 80 percent contained. A warming trend and stronger winds are expected tomorrow that will pose a mild test to containment lines.

Cooperators: Oregon Department of Forestry, Oregon State Fire Marshal, US Forest Service, Lake Chinook Fire District, Crooked River National Grasslands, Central Oregon Fire Management Services, Deschutes and Jefferson counties, PGE/Warm Springs Tribes Land Ownership.


Contact Info:
Tom Fields
Oregon Dept. of Forestry
503-983-8897

Akawana Fire update - June 12, 2016 morning

Oregon Department of Forestry
Incident Management Team 3
Link Smith, Incident Commander

Information:
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4772

Sisters, OR –  All evacuation notices for the Akawana Fire will officially be lifted at 10 a.m. today. Residents not only affected by this fire, but throughout Oregon, are encouraged to treat fire season as if they are under a Level 1 evacuation notice by being ready and prepared in the event a fire impacts their community. Residents can get ready by assembling emergency supplies and belongings in a safe place, planning escape routes and ensuring all those residing within the home know the plan of action. Learn more by visiting www.wildfires.org.

The fire has burned 2,094 acres and is currently 72 percent contained. Total firefighting costs at this point are about $2.3 million.

Firefighters anticipate another favorable day of weather for mop-up operations into the fire’s interior. Stronger winds are expected to return to the area tomorrow, which will serve as a mild test for the fire staying within its current footprint. Crews working on this fire are also available to help local resources, should any new fires occur within the area.

Cooperating agencies assisting in the fire suppression effort include the Central Oregon Fire Management Service, U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management and Jefferson and Deschutes County Emergency Management.    

For the latest updates on the fire, log on to www.facebook.com/ODFCentralOregon.


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Saturday, June 11, 2016

Akawana Fire Quick Facts June 11, 2016 9 p.m.

Akawana Fire Quick Facts
June 11, 2016 9 p.m.

Fire Information:                    

Email Address:                      Akawanafireinfo@gmail.com
Facebook:                          facebook.com/odfcentraloregon
Twitter:                              @centralORFire

Type of Incident:                     Wildfire

Cause:                                       Lightning

Date of Origin:                         June 7, 2016

Location:                                  Akawana Butte, 13 miles North of Sisters

Types of Fuel:                         Grass, Brush and Timber

Structures Threatened:              912

Structures Damaged:                0

Residences Destroyed:             0

Current Size:                            2094 acres

Percent Containment:               72%

Number of Personnel:              595               

Hand Crews:                            22

Fire engines                             17

Bulldozers                               6

Water Tenders                         1

Skidgines                                 4 (track equipment with a water tank and pump)

Helicopters                              6

Note: The Oregon State Fire Marshal’s Incident Management Team and structural task forces working under the Conflagration Act have been released today to return to their home areas. The threat to structures has decreased significantly and conditions continue to improve. OSFM’s Green IMT will remain on the incident through this morning to help ensure a smooth transition.

Cooperators: Oregon Department of Forestry, Oregon State Fire Marshal, US Forest Service, Lake Chinook Fire District, Crooked River National Grasslands, Central Oregon Fire Management Services, Deschutes and Jefferson counties, PGE/Warm Springs Tribes Land Ownership

 ###

Akawana Fire update - June 11, 2016 morning

Contact:
Tom Fields
Oregon Dept. of Forestry
503-983-8897

Sisters, OR –  Fire crews were very successful yesterday and overnight thanks to hard work, cool temperatures and higher humidity. All Level 2 evacuation notifications have now been lowered to Level 1 (be ready). This includes homes in the Three Rivers subdivision (as of June 9), Forest Park, Air Park, Rim Park and their outlying areas (as of yesterday). Gusty afternoon winds spurred one spot fire across containment lines in the southeast corner of the fire that crews, equipment and helicopters quickly attacked and extinguished. Infrared imaging taken overnight shows a solid decrease in heat near the fire’s perimeter.

The Akawana Fire is burning north of Sisters in the Oregon Dept. of Forestry's Central Oregon District. The lightning-caused fire, reported June 7, has burned 2,094 acres and has line completely around it. It is currently 60 percent contained. Total firefighting costs are close to $1.8 million.

Firefighters anticipate favorable weather today as they focus their efforts on mop-up operations into the fire’s interior. While some heavy equipment and air resources are being released, additional crews are being brought in to do the more labor-intensive dirty work of digging out hot spots from beneath stumps and soaking larger fuels on the ground. Crews working on this fire are also available to help local resources, should any new fires occur within the area.

To date, just one minor hand injury has occurred.

Structural task forces working under the Conflagration Act have been released to return to their home areas. The threat to structures has decreased significantly and conditions continue to improve. Oregon State Fire Marshal’s Green incident management team will remain on the incident through this morning to help ensure a smooth transition.

Cooperating agencies assisting in the fire suppression effort include the Central Oregon Fire Management Service, U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management and Jefferson and Deschutes County Emergency Management.    

For the latest updates on the fire, log on to www.facebook.com/ODFCentralOregon.


###

 

 

Friday, June 10, 2016

Akawana Fire update - Friday, June 10, 2016 afternoon

Despite increased wind activity today, firefighters continue to have success corralling the Akawana Fire north of Sisters in the Central Oregon District.

Local residents may see an increase in smoke in the air as crews conduct low-intensity burnout operations of fuels along containment lines to prevent future issues.

Contact:
Tom Fields
Oregon Dept. of Forestry
503-983-8897

Akawana Fire update - June 10, 2016 morning

Contact:
Tom Fields, Oregon Dept. of Forestry, 503-983-8897

Sisters, OR –  Residents in the Lake Billy Chinook area are breathing a little easier this morning thanks to a change in the weather and the persistence of fire crews on the Akawana Fire. Level 2 evacuation notices have been lowered to a Level 1 in the 3 Rivers Subdivision. About 262 homes in Forest Park, Air Park, Rim Park and outlining areas remain in a Level 2 evacuation notification, which calls for residents to be set to go at a moment’s notice. Consistent cloud cover and a trace of rain calmed fire behavior so that firefighters could build containment lines along the fire’s edge and keep the fire from further spread.

As of this morning the fire is 2,065 acres and completely lined. It is currently 44 percent contained. Total firefighting costs are close to $950,000.

While much of the fight has been taken out of the Akawana Fire, firefighters still have a lot of work ahead of them. ODF’s incident management team fire behavior analyst Mike Haasken reiterated to firefighters at this morning’s briefing that, although we will have cooler conditions, the forest fuels are still very dry and susceptible to ignition should something cross containment lines. An infrared photo taken from aircraft overnight indicated that the fire’s edge remains extremely hot. Today’s objectives include strengthening established containment lines and mopping up hot spots from the perimeter into the interior.

Structural task forces protecting homes under the Conflagration Act will continue to stand ready should the fire take an unexpected run. The threat to structures has decreased significantly. If conditions continue to improve throughout today, the OSFM may release some task forces to return to their home communities, however the OSFM will maintain a significant presence for the near future.   

Cooperating agencies assisting in the fire suppression effort include the Central Oregon Fire Management Service, U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management and Jefferson and Deschutes County Emergency Management.     

For the latest updates on the fire, log on to www.facebook.com/ODFCentralOregon.

 

 

 

 

Thursday, June 9, 2016

Akawana Fire update - Thursday, June 9, 2016 evening


Fire Information:   503-983-8897                 

Email Address:                         Akawanafireinfo@gmail.com

Facebook:                                   facebook.com/odfcentraloregon

Twitter:                                         @centralORFire

Type of Incident:                     Wildfire

Cause:                                       Lightning

Date of Origin:                         June 7, 2016

Location:                                 Akawana Butte, 13 miles North of Sisters

Types of Fuel:                         Grass, Brush and Timber

Structures Threatened:              912

Structures Damaged:                0

Residences Destroyed:             0

Current Size:                            1,930 acres

Percent Containment:               44%

Number of Personnel:              561               

Types of resources:                 20 hand crews, 6 helicopters, 5 air tankers, 20 fire engines, 9 bulldozers, 8 water tenders.

The evacuation level for Three Rivers has been lowered to a level 1 (Be Ready), Forest Park, Air Park, Rim Park and outlying properties remain in level 2. A total of 262 structures remain at evacuation level 2 (Be Set).


Akawana Fire Recent Activities:

   Fire crews made solid progress as cooler conditions moderated fire activity, allowing crews to gain direct access to the edge of the fire.

   Spot fires occurred in a few areas, but crews were able to quickly contain them. 

   Air resources (planes and helicopters) played a major role in expanding control lines.

   Tomorrow’s objectives include mopping up hot spots from containment lines into the interior and strengthening lines along the northeast corner of the fire.

   Structural Task Forces protecting homes under the Conflagration Act will continue prepare and safeguard homes until the danger has abated.

###

Akawana Fire update: June 9, 2016

Incident management teams from the Oregon Department of Forestry and the Oregon State Fire Marshal’s Office are currently serving in unified command on the Akawana Fire burning 13 miles north of Sisters. The fire is currently 1,930 acres. Approximately 912 homes in the Three Rivers Grandview area are considered threatened and under a Level 2 evacuation notice. Level 2 indicates that residents should be set for a potential evacuation. Residents must be prepared to leave at a moment’s notice.

The lightning-caused fire was reported on Tuesday, June 7 at 2 p.m. The fire is 30 percent contained and is currently burning on private forestland protected by ODF. The fire is being pushed by 15-20 mph winds and is burning in heavy dead and down fuels. The winds are expected to persist through today with a cooling trend in the next day or two. In all, about 400 firefighters and support staff are expected to work on the fire today. Crews are being supported from the air by helicopters and retardant-dropping air tankers. 

By mid-morning today the wind had calmed a bit.

Due to the threat to structures, Gov.Kate Brown invoked the Conflagration Act Wednesday afternoon at the request of Jefferson County Fire Defense Board Chief Brian Huff. The declaration authorizes the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal to mobilize firefighters and equipment to assist local resources battling the fire. The State Fire Marshal has mobilized four task forces, for a total of approximately 20 pieces of firefighting equipment, including engines and water tenders.

Cooperating agencies assisting in the fire suppression effort include the Central Oregon Fire Management Service, U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management and Jefferson and Deschutes County Emergency Management.     

For the latest updates on the fire, log on to www.facebook.com/ODFCentralOregon.

 

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

Gov. Kate Brown invoked Conflagration Act for Akawana Fire

At 1:40 p.m. Wednesday, Gov. Kate Brown invoked the Emergency Conflagration Act in response to the Akawana Fire near Three Rivers. Officials report the fire began at about 2 p.m. on Tuesday, June 6, and has spread quickly. A Level 2 pre-evacuation notice was issued today to Three Rivers residents.

"To ensure the safety of Jackson County residents, and given the dry and windy conditions on the ground, I am invoking an emergency declaration to make additional state resources available to firefighters and local first responders," Brown said.

In accordance with ORS 476.510-476.610, Gov. Brown determined that a threat to life, safety, and property exists due to the fire and the threat exceeds the firefighting capabilities of local firefighting personnel and equipment.

The Governor's declaration authorizes the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal to mobilize resources to assist local resources battling the fire. 

2,000-acre Akawana Fire burning north of Sisters

The 2,000-acre Akawana Fire reported June 7 is burning 13 miles north of the town of Sisters in the Oregon Dept. of Forestry’s Central Oregon District on private lands. ODF has dispatched an incident management team to the fire. It will take over command of the firefighting operation from local ODF forces Thursday morning, with the incident command post to be located at the ODF office in Sisters. The fire is burning in heavy brush and beetle-killed ponderosa pine fuels.

Terrain is moderate, enabling bulldozers to build fire line effectively. The fire burned actively Tuesday evening with steady winds promoting spread. ODF fire managers expect continued growth over the next 24 hours as wind is forecast to persist.
The fire is threatening approximately 1,200 homes in the Three Rivers subdivision near Lake Billy Chinook. Gov. Kate Brown has invoked the Oregon Conflagration Act to provide added protection to homes and other structures. The Conflagration Act authorizes structural firefighters and equipment from around the state to assist local fire departments in battling the fire.

In addition, the Oregon State Fire Marshal has dispatched a structural incident management team to the fire to assist with protection of homes and other structures.

Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Two large fires burning in eastern Oregon

The following two wildfires are burning on Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service lands respectively:

Owyhee Canyon Fire – The 20,500-acre fire is burning 38 miles SW of Jordan Valley, Ore., on the  Vale BLM District. It is 50 percent contained. It was reported the afternoon of June 5. Cause: lightning. Resources include: 25 fire engines, 4 water tenders, 2 dozers, 4 Snake River Valley hand crews, 1 hot shot crew and miscellaneous air resources. According to Marvin Vetter, the Jordan Valley Rangeland Protection Association has been assisting on the fire since Saturday. More wind and lightning are forecast for today.

Draw Fire – The 400-acre fire is burning 20 miles NE of Chiloquin on the Fremont-Winema NF. It is uncontained. It was reported the morning of June 5. Winds carried the blaze over a control line and spot fires started beyond the fire line. Cause: under investigation. Resources include: 75 firefighters, various air tankers and helicopters. The South Central Oregon Fire Management Partnership Type 3 IMT is scheduled to take over the fire the morning of June 7.

Monday, June 6, 2016

 (The following news release was sent out today by the Douglas Forest Protective Association).

Fire Season begins June 8 on DFPA-protected land

The Douglas Forest Protective Association announced that the 2016 fire season will officially begin Wednesday, June 8 at 12:01 a.m. on all private, county, state, and BLM lands protected by DFPA.  
 
The declaration of fire season imposes certain fire restrictions on both the general public and industrial forest workers to help prevent wildfires.

With the declaration of fire season, exploding targets, tracer ammunition, and sky lanterns are prohibited on, or within, one-eighth of a mile of DFPA-protected land.

The start of fire season also means the end of unregulated outside debris burning for rural Douglas County residents. Due to poor burning conditions which have come earlier this year than normal, burn permits for debris piles and burn barrels will not be issued by DFPA or Douglas County Fire District No. 2.  

Those wishing to burn yard debris before Wednesday are encouraged to exercise caution and are reminded to never leave the burn unattended. In addition, fire officials recommend checking any debris piles that were burned earlier this spring.  f not properly extinguished, burn piles have the potential of smoldering for weeks, or even months, before popping back to life on a warm, windy day.

Fire season also means the start of industrial fire regulations. On Wednesday, the entire Douglas District will go into Industrial Fire Precaution Level I (one.)  During IFPL I,smoking is prohibited while working on, or traveling through, an industrial operation.  
In addition, specified fire tools and suppression equipment must be on site and ready for use at all operations. A fire watch service is also required once work has completed for the day.
As fire season progresses, additional public and industrial restrictions may be imposed as fire conditions become more severe. 
For more information about public or industrial restrictions on lands protected by DFPA, call DFPA’s Closure Information Line at 541-672-0379, or visit www.dfpa.net.  
 
An interactive map with state wide fire restrictions can also be viewed online at www.oregon.gov/ODF/Fire/Pages/Restrictions.aspx

Sunday, June 5, 2016

 (The following news release was sent out early Sunday morning by the Douglas Forest Protective Association).

Douglas County landfill fire

The Douglas County 911 Center received a report of a fire burning in the Douglas County Landfill, Saturday evening, at approximately 7:55 pm.  Firefighters from various agencies and crews from the Douglas County Public Works Department arrived at the landfill - located south of Roseburg near McLain Avenue - and began suppression efforts to extinguish the fire.

Crews spent the evening cooling the fire with water and began moving truckloads of dirt, which will be used to cover the smoldering material within the landfill.  

As of Saturday evening, the fire was contained within the landfill and has a minimal chance of spreading.  Crews will continue to work through the night to fully contain the fire.

No structures were threatened by the fire, and no injuries have been reported.  

Agencies assisting in the suppression efforts include the Douglas County Public Works Department, Douglas County Fire District #2, Roseburg Fire Department, North Douglas Fire & EMS, Douglas Forest Protective Association, and the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office.

Friday, June 3, 2016

Railroad fire burning at Mosier


[Following is a report from the Oregon State Fire Marshal's Office on the status of a fire in the town of Mosier, Oregon. The Oregon Dept. of Forestry has fire engines on scene to protect wildlands in the vicinity of the fire.]
 
- 3:40 p.m. Friday, June 3, 2016 -
 
The OSFM has activated its Agency Operations Center for the purpose of managing information and communication regarding the Wasco County Train Derailment near the city of Mosier, Oregon.

Current information indicates that there was a derailment of 11 cars of a Union Pacific crude oil train near the city of Mosier,

Oregon. On scene personnel indicate that one tank car is burning.

A unified command has been established between Mosier Rural Fire and Mid-Columbia Fire and Rescue.

OSFM Hazmat Emergency Response Team # 3 from Gresham is responding along with resources from Union Pacific

Railroad and Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad, and additional local, state, and federal resources.

Schools in Mosier have been evacuated and are being taken to Wahtonka campus in The Dalles.

Law enforcement is assisting with evacuations of threatened homes within a one-half mile radius of the incident. Those residents are also being accepted at the Wahtonka campus in The Dalles.

The Oregon Department of Transportation has closed I-84 westbound at The Dalles, MP 87, and eastbound at Mosier, MP 64. ODOT says traffic should detour to Washington SR 14.

Union Pacific and Burlington Northern railroads are deploying foam trailers and other supporting equipment to the incident.

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Comments and questions

The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

Cool, wet weather in the winter of 2016-17 ended Oregon's long drought and left a thick snowpack at higher elevations which will take some time to melt. However, even in non-drought years Oregon's warm, dry summers create conditions that allow for fire to start and spread. In an average summer firefighters still see almost a thousand fires on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.



What we do

Protection jurisdiction

The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state- and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. There are about 30.4 million total acres of forest in Oregon.



Fire suppression policy

The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. While suppressing large fires can cost millions of dollars, economic and environmental damage from wildfires can be many times greater.




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Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers in Salem, Ore., maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.