2015 another severe fire season

By mid-October 2016, ODF's net expenditures on large wildfires stood at $13.2 million. The lack of dry lightning played a significant role in the moderate firefighting costs this season. In 2015, large-fire costs totaled $29.6 million.


Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Fire danger reducing and restrictions lifted in SC Oregon

September 20, 2016
Media Contact: Tamara Schmidt
541-947-6243

LAKEVIEW, Ore. – As of this morning, the fire danger had been reduced from extreme to high, the Industrial Fire Precaution Level was reduced to 2 on lands under the South Central Oregon Fire Management Partnership and Public Use Restrictions were lifted in several areas.
The IFPL affects lands administered by the Fremont-Winema National Forest, the Bureau of Land Management Lakeview District and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at Sheldon-Hart Mountain and Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuge Complexes. The Public Use Restrictions are also lifted on these public lands.
The only Lakeview District BLM lands not included in this are those within the Klamath Falls Resource Area west of Langell Valley. This area is under the protection of the Oregon Department of Forestry, which remains under regulated use. For information on specific restrictions in areas under ODF’s fire protection, please visit http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Fire/Pages/Restrictions.aspx.

Crater Lake National Park remains under Stage 1 Fire Restrictions, prohibiting campfires in the backcountry and restricting campfires and smoking to designated areas. For more information, please visit www.nps.gov/crla and select “Alerts.”

Personal and commercial woodcutters are allowed to resume operations in accordance with their permit and current IFPL levels. Woodcutters are reminded of their responsibility to stay informed of current IFPLs and all restrictions that apply to activities conducted on public lands. Failure to comply with the fire precautionary requirements may result in a violation notice.

“While the Public Use Restrictions are lifted and the fire danger is decreasing, conditions are still dry,” said Interagency Fire Staff Officer Barry Shullanberger.  “As people go out to enjoy their public lands – whether it’s cutting firewood, hunting, camping or just enjoying the warm weather – we ask that they be careful with anything that can throw a spark and to make sure campfires are completely out and cold to the touch before leaving.”

Visitors should also be aware of their surroundings and prepared for changing weather conditions as the seasons change. This includes reporting visible smoke that could be from a wildfire.

For more information on SCOFMP, please visit www.scofmp.org, on Twitter @scofmpfireinfo or on Facebook at http://facebook.com/scofmpfireinfo.

###

No comments:

Post a Comment

Have a question/comment about this season's wildfire activity on the 16 million acres of private and public forestlands that the Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects from wildfire? Let us know. Please keep your remarks civil and free of profanity.

Comments and questions

The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

The weather conditions setting up for this summer are ominous: continuing drought, meager winter snowpack, and above-average temperatures forecast through August.

What we do

Protection jurisdiction
The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state- and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. There are about 30.4 million total acres of forest in Oregon.

Fire suppression policy
The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. Suppression of large fires can run into millions of dollars.

Followers

About Me

My photo
Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.