FIRE RESTRICTIONS MAP

AN INTERACTIVE MAP SHOWING CURRENT PUBLIC USE RESTRICTIONS AS WELL AS INDUSTRIAL FIRE PRECAUTION LEVELS CAN BE FOUND AT: www.oregon.gov/odf/pages/fire/precautionlevelmap.aspx




Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Tuesday a successful day for Central Oregon District firefighters

June 30 was a very successful day for firefighters working in ODF's Central Oregon District(COD). All fires in the John Day Unit were held within containment lines. 

The Jones Canyon Fire was mapped at 840 acres yesterday. Several SPA [special purpose appropriation] aircraft were used to aid firefighters on the ground and hold the fire within fire lines.  This fire is burning in steep rocky terrain with difficult access.  Firefighters will be focusing on mop-up on this fire over the next several days. There is significant work to be done to cool hot spots and strengthen the fire line. 

Firefighters at the Harper Complex will continue to focus on mop-up within the containment lines of the fires. There has been no growth on these fires since Monday.

On Monday The Dalles Unit held the Happy Ridge Fire to just under 15 acres. This fire had significant potential, burning in pine and oak with high temperatures. The fire boss from Salem and SEATs [single engine air tankers] were used to cool fuels and allow crews and dozers to construct line.   

Fire crews throughout the district have provided mutual aid to other agencies in addition to suppressing numerous ODF fires ignited by the weekend thunderstorms. Extreme fire conditions remain throughout the district with high temperatures, low humidity, and increasing winds.  Yesterday’s success will allow fire managers to regroup and prepare for thunderstorms forecast for later this weekend and early next week as well as the potential fire activity over the holiday weekend. The potential for holdover fires remains a threat throughout the district.

Over the next few days resources will be released from the fires and will be returning to their home units. Sending units will be contacted to plan for their return. These resources have done an outstanding job, and are much appreciated for their hard work.

ODF Team 1 (John Buckman, incident commander) has been making significant progress on the Sugarloaf Fire burning on BLM Offset private lands as well as BLM and inside the John Day Fossil Beds. This fire is approximately 4,800 acres. Yesterday team assumed command of the Blue Basin Fire inside the Fossil Beds, which burned just over 300 acres. This fire is under investigation and is currently in mop-up status. Later this afternoon the team will assume control of the Corner Creek Fire, estimated to have grown to over 6,000 acres since it was discovered on June 29. Corner Creek is also burning on BLM Offset private lands, BLM and Forest Service lands. It is located about 11 miles south of Dayville on the edge of the Black Canyon Wilderness. The fire is burning away from the wilderness on the west side of the S. Fork of the John Day River. The fire is burning across the river from the site of the South Fork Complex which burned in 2014. Yesterday the fire grew from 2,500 to the estimated 6,000 acres. A VLAT [very large air tanker], 3 tankers, 4 SEATs [single engine air tankers] and 3 helicopters were used to protect structures along Wind Creek. 

As we have all heard and seen, fire conditions are extreme with no relief in sight. Resources from other districts and areas, along with the SPA aircraft, contributed to the effort and success in controlling these fires under extreme conditions. While it is only July 1, we are truly in the heart of fire season. 

Thanks to all the firefighters who have come to COD and helped put the fires out, as well as to everyone who has picked up extra duties back in their home units.  

Douglas tightens fire restrictions July 2

The fire danger is high, and conditions on the ground, combined with hot, dry weather have prompted the Douglas Forest Protective Association to tighten fire restrictions on forest operations. Beginning 1 a.m. Thursday, July 2, DFPA will impose Industrial Fire Precaution Level III (3) on all private, county, state, and Bureau of Land Management lands within DFPA’s 1.6 million acre districtThe increase means that industrial operators are prohibited in performing the following:

·         Cable yarding – except that gravity operated logging systems with non-motorized carriages may operate before 1 p.m. or after 8 p.m. when all blocks and moving lines are suspended 10 feet above ground except the line between the carriage and the chokers;

·         Power saws – except at loading sites and at tractor skidder operations before 1 p.m. or after 8 p.m.

In addition, the following activities are permitted before 1:00 p.m. and after 8:00 p.m.

·         Tractor, skidder, feller-buncher, forwarder, or shovel logging operations where tractors, skidders, or other equipment with a blade capable of constructing fireline are immediately available to quickly reach and effectively attack a fire start;

·         Mechanized loading or hauling of any product or material;

·         Blasting;

·         Welding or cutting of metal;

·         Any other spark emitting operation not specifically mentioned.

For the general public, fire restrictions are increasing as well.  Under DFPA’s Regulated Use Closure, when IFPL III goes into effect, all non-industrial chain saw use is prohibited.  In addition, several changes have been made to the Regulated Use Closure which also take effect July 2.

  • The cutting, grinding and welding of metal for non-industrial purposes is prohibited, between the hours of 10 a.m. and 8 p.m.  Cutting, grinding and welding of metal is permitted at all other hours, if conducted in a cleared area and if a water supply is present. 

·         The mowing of dead, dry grass with power driven equipment is prohibited between the hours of 10 a.m. and 8 p.m.

For more information about the current industrial and public use closures that are in effect, visit www.dfpa.net or call the information line 541-672-0379.

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Sugarloaf Fire update - July 1, 2015 morning

Oregon Department of Forestry
Incident Mgmt. Team 1                                                                                                        
John Buckman, Incident Commander                                                                                            

Contact: Brian Ballou, Information Officer, (541) 621-4156                                                           

 FIRE AT A GLANCE

Size: 4,802 acres
Containment: 40 percent

Firefighting resources:
13 hand crews
18 fire engines
2 bulldozers
3 water tenders
350 total personnel

Today's plans on the 4,802-acre Sugarloaf Fire include completing more of the fire containment lines on the north and southeast edges of the fire and continuing the mop-up. Hoses have been set up in the hotter northeastern part of the fire to help extinguish the heavier fuels. Other fire resources will be patrolling to monitor burned areas for signs of hot spots.  Some residual fuels within the fire area will continue to burn, reducing the chances for the fire to flare up later.

On the 317-acre Blue Basin Fire today, a separate fire being managed by this team, and on nearby portions of the Sugarloaf Fire, firefighters continue to patrol and monitor the fire.  Little heat remains in this area.  Part of this area is in the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument.
Yesterday this fire team also assumed responsibility for the Schoolhouse Gulch Fire. It is about 2 miles east of Dayville, roughly 100 acres in size, and has been mopped up.

Later today, this fire team will assume suppression responsibility for the Corner Creek Fire. It is burning on the west side of the South Fork John Day River, about 11 miles south of Dayville. This fire covers about 6,000 acres, on the Ochoco National Forest, Bureau of Land Management Prineville District, and private lands. Fire suppression crews from the Sugarloaf Fire were assigned to the Corner Creek Fire today.
The forecast for the rest of the week is for continuing hot weather with low humidity. Winds are a concern, especially in the evenings when “sundowner” winds have been gusting to 20 mph.
Information about the Sugarloaf Fire is posted online at www.centralorfireinfo.blogspot.com.

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Oregon Dept. of Forestry fire update - July 1, 2015

FIRES ON ODF-PROTECTED LANDS

The lightning-caused Jones Canyon Fire is 500 to 600 acres, burning in the Fossil Subunit of the Central Oregon District, 12 miles NE of Monument. The fire is active and uncontained.

Harper Creek Complex – The complex includes three fires: The largest is the Harper Creek Fire at 321 acres, located four miles south of Mt. Vernon. It is 50-75% contained and in mop-up. The Hog Creek Fire is 96 acres, located six miles east of Long Creek. The Luce Creek Fire is 25 acres, located three miles SW of John Day. These two smaller fires are fully contained. All are lightning caused and located in the John Day Unit of the Central Oregon District.


FIRES ON OTHER LANDS

The lightning-caused Sugarloaf Fire is 4,802 acres. It is burning in the Prineville BLM District north of Dayville and is 40 percent contained. ODF’s Incident Management Team 1 is in command of the suppression operation.  

The 14,049-acre Jaca Reservoir Fire burning 87 miles south of Vale on Bureau of Land Management lands is 70 percent contained. Cause is under investigation. More info: http://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/information/fire_info.aspx

The lightning-caused 317-acre 0301 PR Blue Basin Fire burning nine miles north of Dayville is 50 percent contained. The Bureau of Land Management is the lead agency. More info: http://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/information/fire_info.aspx

The 840-acre Jones Canyon Fire burning 20 miles SW of Ukiah is 22 percent contained. Cause is under investigation. More info: http://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/information/fire_info.aspx

The 639-acre Little Basin Fire burning in the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area, Wallowa-Whitman Nat’l Forest, is 97 percent contained. Cause is under investigation. More info: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4290/

The lightning-caused, 5,345-acre Buckskin Fire burning on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest is 60 percent contained. More info: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4286/

The lightning-caused, 362-acre Bunker Hill Complex burning 30 miles SE of Oakridge on the Willamette National Forest is 50 percent contained. More info: http://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/information/fire_info.aspx

The lightning-caused, 9,000-acre Leslie Gulch Fire burning 45 miles south of Vale on Bureau of Land Management lands is uncontained. More info: http://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/information/fire_info.aspx

The lightning-caused, 462-acre Candy Kid Fire burning on Bureau of Land Management lands eight miles north of Drewsy is 30  percent contained. More info: http://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/information/fire_info.aspx

The lightning-caused Corner Creek Fire burning 11 miles south of Dayville on National Forest lands is 6,000 acres and uncontained. More info: http://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/information/fire_info.aspx

The lightning-caused, 300-acre OR-OCH-000297 Fire burning 11 miles south of Dayville on National Forest lands is uncontained. More info: http://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/information/fire_info.aspx \

Tuesday Fires squelched by Douglas Forest Protective Association

The Douglas Forest Protective Association and local fire departments responded to two natural cover fires Tuesday afternoon.  

The first fire was reported at 1:50 p.m. near Highway 138 West, Mile Post 16.  A brushing crew in the area from the Douglas County Public Works Department and employees from ODOT worked on suppressing the fire before DFPA and Kellogg Volunteer Fire Department arrived on scene.  Firefighters were able to stop the fire spread at 1/2 acre.  Firefighters remained on scene until 6:00 p.m. securing fire trails and mopping up hot spots.  

Fire officials determined that the fire was caused by a holdover debris pile which was burned earlier this spring.  Fire official ask that anyone who has burned debris piles this past winter or spring, check the burned area for any remaining heat or smoke, as debris piles have the ability to smolder for long periods of time before popping back to life on hot, windy days.
 
As firefighters were responding to the fire on Highway 138 West, a second fire was reported at 1:55 p.m. at Cooper Creek Reservoir near Sutherlin.  Firefighters from DFPA, Douglas County Fire District #2, and Fair Oaks Rural Fire Department responded to the fire and stopped the spread at 1/10th of an acre.  

Fire officials determined that the Cooper Creek fire was started by juveniles playing with a lighter.
 
With hot, dry weather forecasted for the next week, fire officials ask that everyone know and follow the public use restrictions currently in effect.  Fire official says that the dry fuels in wildland areas are currently at conditions normally seen towards the end of July or early August.
 
For a complete list of public or industrial restrictions currently in effect, visit www.dfpa.net or call 541-672-0379.

Sugarload Fire update - 06-30-15 evening

Oregon Department of Forestry
Incident Management Team 1
John Buckman, Incident Commander

Contact: Brian Ballou, Information Officer, (541) 621-4156

FIRE AT A GLANCE
5,016 acres
20 percent contained
Lightning-caused
Night Shift Resources:
3 hand crews
2 fire engines
2 water tenders
75 total personnel

Fire activity was moderate on the Sugarloaf Fire today, with little additional acreage burned outside of the previous fire perimeter. Some interior pockets of unburned fuels were consumed, reducing the chance of a reburn later. Crews were able to establish a fire line along part of the north to northeast edge of the fire. More mopup was completed around the structures along Dick Creek Road.
A Hot Shot crew worked on the Blue Basin Fire near State Route 19, maintaining containment of the fire without damaging any sites in the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument. A crew also suppressed a small lightning fire discovered today, about four miles north of Sugarloaf Mountain. Today this fire team also assumed responsibility for the Schoolhouse Gulch Fire. It is about 2 miles east of Dayville, roughly 100 acres in size, and relatively quiet.
Tonight the fire personnel will lay hoses along the fire lines that the day shift completed on the northeast part of the fire. This area has more trees and other heavy fuels which burn more intensely. The hose lays will be needed to supply enough water to extinguish this part of the fire. Other night shift personnel will continue to patrol the fire, watching for hot spots to extinguish. They will concentrate their efforts near the structures and along Dick Creek Road. A “heavy” helicopter will be available to help with water drops if needed until about 9:00 p.m.
On Wednesday, this fire team will be assuming suppression responsibility for the Corner Creek Fire. It is burning on the west side of the South Fork John Day River about 11 miles south of Dayville. This fire grew several thousand acres today.
The forecast for the rest of the week is for continuing hot weather with low humidity. Winds are a concern, especially in the evenings when “sundowner” winds have been gusting to 20 mph. Some nights the winds haven’t abated until 2 a.m.
Information about the Sugarloaf Fire is posted online at www.centralorfireinfo.blogspot.com.

Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Jones Canyon Fire update - 06-30-15, evening

The Jones Canyon Fire in the John Day Unit of the Central Oregon District is currently 800 acres. Potential of this lightning-caused fire burning in grass, brush and juniper fuels remains high.

Comments and questions

The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments you have about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity. You are also welcome to contact us by email at: information@odf.state.or.us.

Current wildfire info

The weather conditions setting up for this summer are ominous: continuing drought, meager winter snowpack, and above-average temperatures forecast through August.

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Protection jurisdiction
The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state- and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. There are about 30.4 million total acres of forest in Oregon.

Fire suppression policy
The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. Suppression of large fires can run into millions of dollars.

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Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.