Current situation

Cooler air should start moving across the area late Thursday or Friday, bringing more widespread showers with some embedded wet thunderstorms west of the Cascades. Precipitation should taper off into the weekend. The potential for new significant fires will stay low across the Pacific Northwest into next week.


Thanks to cooler temperatures, and higher humidity and precipitation, fire restrictions have started to be reduced in different parts of the state depending on the local fuel conditions. Check with your local district or forest protection association for restrictions on activities linked to fire starts or use ODF's fire restrictions and closures web page for the latest details at http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Fire/Pages/Restrictions.aspx.





Monday, September 17, 2018

ODF Fire Update for Monday, Sept. 17

Terwilliger Fire - Willamette National Forest
This past weekend, a special team of staff from the McKenzie River Ranger District worked to mitigate hazards posed by fire weakened and damaged trees around the Terwilliger Hot Springs. The fire burned through the springs with varying levels of severity. Approximately, five burned trees were felled. These trees posed the most imminent danger of falling and further damaging the springs and the rock work constructed around them. Additional hazard trees around the hot springs will likely need to be felled in the coming months. Only the minimum number of staff needed to do this work are entering the area due to the myriad of fire hazards that remain in the vicinity of the springs and along Aufderheide Scenic Byway (Forest Service Road 19).

After effects of the Terwilliger Hot Springs.

Forest Service Road (FR) 19 remains closed to the public due to unsafe conditions from falling rocks, debris and fire weakened trees. The closure begins at the junction of FR 408 south to Box Canyon. Firefighters are allowed on portions of FR 19 where mitigations to reduce risks have been taken. No fire traffic, except for emergency vehicles, are allowed on FR 19 adjacent to the Cougar Reservoir; beginning from the junction of FR 415 south to the FR 1985. The Terwilliger (Cougar) Hot Springs remain closed. The public is asked to respect the road and area closures for the protection to themselves and firefighters.



 
Location: 5 miles southeast of Blue River
Cause: Under investigation
Acres burned: 11,082
Personnel: 367
Containment: 75%
More information:

Klondike Fire West
Klondike Fire is still actively burning.
Fire activity was minimal yesterday with some fire growth reported in the Indigo Creek and Silver Creek drainages. Helicopters were used to keep these areas of growth in check. Small amounts of rain fell over the western portions of the fire area, but not enough to change fire behavior significantly on a long-term basis. A drying trend is forecast for the area and is expected to bring about a rise in fire activity for the next few days.

Firefighters are continuing to focus on mopping up and holding the fireline, as well as felling snags and fire-damaged trees along forest roadways. Road graders will continue repair work on the roads and contingency lines west of the fire perimeter. Work on construction of check lines between the North Fork of Indigo Creek and Cedar Mountain, which are in place as potential control lines, should be completed today.

Evacuation Information: The evacuation level in the Agness Zone remains at 2 - Be Set.

Location: 9 miles northwest of Selma
Ignition date: July 15, 2018
Cause: Lightning
Acres burned: 140,232 acres
Personnel: 633
Containment: 72%
More information:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5998/ 

Miles and Columbus fires 
(formerly the South Umpqua Complex/Sugar Pine Fires; also includes Snow Shoe and Round Top)
Tom Merritt, Incident Commander with the US Forest Service ICT3, took command today at 0600. 

Despite starting July 15, the Miles Fire continues to burn actively in the interior of the fire.
This photo was taken Sept. 15 in the northeast section where firefighters were actively patrolling.
Firefighters will continue to patrol and secure the fire's perimeter as well as repair lines to a more natural condition. Crews are being reallocated to other areas of the fire as work is completed. Personnel are identifying equipment no longer in use for suppression or repair work and will release it to other incidents if needed.

Appropriate hazard reduction for employees, contractors, and the public may be needed. This work includes the identification and mitigation of danger trees next to roads, trails, and firelines which pose a significant threat to firefighters and the public when the area is reopened.

Weather is expected to be drier Monday through Thursday, with a cold front coming on-shore Friday. This cold front will increase the potential for showers and higher relative humidity (RH) in the Fire area. RH over the Fire area will drop into the low 30s-hi 20s during the week. Typical early morning downslope winds of 1-3 mph will occur, and afternoon transport winds from the west-northwest will predominate.

Location: Approximately 7 miles northeast of Trail
Ignition date: July 15, 2018
Cause: Lightning
Acres burned: Combined total of 54,134 acres
Personnel: 310
Containment: 70%
More information:

Friday, September 14, 2018

ODF Fire Update for Friday, Sept. 14

Ongoing fires

Terwilliger Fire - Willamette National Forest
Northwest Incident Management Team 8 (NWIMT8), Incident Commander, Doug Johnson, assumed management of the Terwilliger Fire on Wednesday morning. 

Scattered precipitation was received over the fire area Wednesday resulting in minimal fire activity. Fire continues to creep slowly east into the Three Sisters Wilderness. Fire crews are monitoring fire activity from the air and ground. Firefighters are remaining vigilant as moisture hasn't soaked through the forest canopy and dry receptive fuels remain. Fire resources patrolled and mopped-up heat on the west flank near the private lands. The burning intensity was scattered and a "dirty burn" resulted where various fuels remain and could be subject to re-burn. Therefore, emphasis on locating and cooling hotspots is of the utmost importance. Suppression repair work is also being identified.

Tree fallen on Forest Service Road (FR) 19 taken on Sept. 7.
Local officials have decided to close Forest Service Road (FR) 19 to all traffic, including to firefighters, due to unsafe conditions. From its intersection with FR 1900-408 south to, and including, Box Canyon hazardous debris, such as car-sized boulders and very large trees, continue to create very high risk situations and near-miss incidents. The number one objective of any incident managers is to keep all firefighters and the public safe by limiting exposure. Only emergency vehicles, in case there is a need for rapid evacuation of injured personnel, will be allowed. 

Location: 5 miles southeast of Blue River
Cause: Under investigation
Acres burned: 10,948
Personnel: 421
Containment: 66%
More information:

Klondike Fire West
Helicopter crews performed tactical firing along 150 road to reinforce containment lines. Today, cool and damp weather conditions are expected to result in smoldering and creeping fire spread with limited perimeter growth. Today's burning period will shorten while winds out of the west-northwest will assist with tactical firing operations. Crews will continue mop-up between Game Lake and Saddle Mtn. On the north side of the fire, crews will hold the fire along the 150 Road down toward Indigo Creek and East along the 2308 Road toward Bear Camp Road. At Silver Mine, hose lays and structure protection are in place should the fire advance onto private land.

Evacuation Information: The evacuation level in the Agness Zone remains at 2 - Be Set.

Location: 9 miles northwest of Selma
Ignition date: July 15, 2018
Cause: Lightning
Acres burned: 138,212 acres
Personnel: 1,015
Containment: 64%
More information:

Miles and Columbus fires 
(formerly the South Umpqua Complex/Sugar Pine Fires; also includes Snow Shoe and Round Top)
Firefighters continue to patrol and secure the fire's perimeter as well as repair lines to a more natural. Crews are being reallocated to other areas of the fire as work is completed. Personnel are locating and evaluating equipment no longer in use for suppression or repair work and will release it to other incidents if needed.

Location: Approximately 7 miles northeast of Trail
Ignition date: July 15, 2018
Cause: Lightning
Acres burned: Combined total of 54,068 acres
Personnel: 301
Containment: 65%
More information:

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Oregon's drought persists despite recent light rainfall

SALEM, Ore. - It will take some time for recent rains to make up for the state's exceptionally dry summer. Precipitation for the month of August was well below normal according to the Oregon Water Conditions Report, issued by the Oregon Water Resources Department. Some areas received as little as 5 percent of normal precipitation. Areas west of the Cascades and northwestern Oregon were especially dry.

In the past 30 days temperatures have been generally warmer than normal, particularly in the northeast, southwest, and southeast corners of the state.


In the past two weeks temperatures have been cooler at the coast, in the Cascades and in the north central region. The exceptions were eastern and southeastern regions of the state, where temperatures were up to six degrees warmer than normal for this time of year.


Over the next 8 to 14 days, the federal Climate Prediction Center is forecasting an increased probability of above-normal temperatures across most of Oregon. The most recent three-month outlook still indicates increased chances of above-normal temperatures statewide.


Drought conditions not yet over in Oregon

The most recent update to the U.S. Drought Monitor indicates continued drought conditions across Oregon. According to the Monitor's Sept. 4, 2018 report, 100% of the state is listed as abnormally dry, with 84% in severe drought and almost 22% in extreme drought.  

At the start of September, nine Oregon counties were under state-declared drought status. Twelve counties as of Sept. 5 met U.S. Department of Agriculture's drought designation. 

Oregon statewide water year precipitation at snow-monitoring sites continues to hover at just under 86% of normal. The lowest values are in the Rogue/Umpqua basins at 76% of normal for the water year. The highest amounts of water-year precipitation are currently in the Umatilla, Walla Walla, and Willow basins with 102% of normal.

Monday, September 10, 2018

Rains dampen, but don't extinguish, chances for more new significant fire activity


Record dry spells in the Willamette Valley were broken up over the weekend and early Monday, with nominal rain falling from Portland south to Eugene. Precipitation was heavier in the northwest Coast Range, with some coastal rain as far south as Coos Bay.  

However, no rain fell on most of southwest Oregon, where fire conditions remain extreme or high. The 10-day forecast calls for seasonal temperatures with lower-than-normal precipitation. Fuel moisture remains very low, and even areas that saw rainfall will need significantly more before this changes.

Meteorologists expect more rain this week west of the Cascades - chances are lower in southwest Oregon - with possible showers on the east side as well. 

ODF Fire Update for Monday, Sept. 10


Round-up of new significant fire activity 
The Row River Road Fire in the South Cascade district was contained at initial attack last Wednesday (Sept. 5) at 12 acres. However, it destroyed four residences and three outbuildings. The cause is under investigation.

The Tepee Fire started Friday, Sept. 7 about 17 miles southeast of Bend. It stands at 2,067 acres and 40% contained. Road, trail and area closures are in effect. A Type 3 Incident Management Team is managing the fire. 

The Willow Fire also started Friday, Sept. 7, burning on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands just east of Madras. This fire is at about 400 acres and 60% contained. Firefighters resumed mop-up today, but terrain is a challenge. Containment is expected to rise today as crews cool hot spots on fire lines. All evacuations were lifted on Sunday.

Ongoing fires
Terwilliger Fire - Willamette National Forest
After backing down Sawtooth Ridge on Friday, the northeast section of the fire showed little activity over the weekend. Moderate to low-intensity fire continues to move slowly east into the Three Sisters Wilderness. Helicopters performed bucket drops over the weekend and are available as needed.

Location: 5 miles southeast of Blue River
Cause: Under investigation
Acres burned: 10,944
Personnel: 562
Containment: 66%
More information:

Klondike Fire West
As expected, fire activity on the Klondike West Fire remains tied to the weather with moderate fire behavior. On Sunday afternoon, conditions were right for a successful tactical firing operation from Forest Service Road 2308 Northeast to Brandy Creek. With moderate fire activity, other planned burns were delayed due to wind direction and low relative humidity contributing to small spot fires across the line. Crews are waiting for favorable winds with a plan to run a swing shift this evening in hopes of opportunities for burning.  

Evacuation Information: The evacuation level in the Agness Zone remains at 2 - Be Set.

Location: 9 miles northwest of Selma
Ignition date: July 15, 2018
Cause: Lightning
Acres burned: 132,420 acres
Personnel: 1,303
Containment: 51%
More information:

Watson Creek Fire - Lake County
This fire was turned back over to the local unit today. Teams will be performing suppression repair. The fire is expected to continue to smolder and smoke until a season-ending precipitation event occurs. Crews will patrol and monitor. This will be the final report unless significant activity occurs.

Location: 
6 miles west of Paisley
Ignition Date: August 15, 2018
Cause: 
Under investigation
Acres burned:
59,061 acres
Personnel:
88
Containment:
95%
More information: 

Miles and Columbus fires 
(formerly the South Umpqua Complex/Sugar Pine Fires; also includes Snow Shoe and Round Top)
The Miles and Columbus fires merged last week, as expected. A Type 3 Incident Management Team took over on Monday. Growth has been relatively light as fire patrols and suppression repair continue.

Location: Approximately 7 miles northeast of Trail
Ignition date: July 15, 2018
Cause: Lightning
Acres burned: Combined total of 53,653 acres
Personnel: 261
Containment: 65%
More information:


Friday, September 7, 2018

Statewide fire preparedness level drops with expected decrease in fire activity

As new fire activity has significantly slowed this week and requests for firefighting resources decline, the statewide fire preparedness level dropped to Level 3 on Friday.

While there are still a few large fires on the landscape - the largest in Oregon being Klondike West at 117,458 acres - this is nevertheless an encouraging sign. No ODF incident management teams are deployed at present, although ODF staff are represented on some large fires.  

The fire preparedness level is best understood as a measurement of demand for firefighting resources. Lowering the preparedness level reflects a sustained decrease in this demand. ODF and other partners in Oregon's complete and coordinated system are maintaining formidable firefighting forces and are still putting out new fires with initial attack and battling to fully contain existing blazes. 

ODF Fire Update for Sept. 7, 2018

Hugo Road Fire - Jackson County
Containment continues to increase and now stands at 86% on this fire, which started last week. The cause is now reported as a tree falling on power lines. Crews have finished mopping up 300 feet from the fire's edge. The final size is 199 acres.

Several firefighters from this fire responded to a new fire start six miles northeast of Selma, catching it at roughly two acres. 

Location: 
10 miles northwest of Grants Pass
Cause: 
Tree falling on power lines
Acres burned: 199
Personnel: 140
Containment: 86%
More information:
Terwilliger Fire - Willamette National Forest
Fire behavior was generally less active yesterday as smoke covered the area throughout the day. Crews mopped up, chipped and patrolled areas on the west and north perimeter, while the northeast side is slowly backing down a north-facing slope. Crews located and extinguished spot fires to the south. Helicopters are assisting with bucket drops as smoke permits.
 
Location: 5 miles southeast of Blue River
Cause: Under investigation
Acres burned: 9,639
Personnel: 674
Containment: 35%
More information:

Klondike Fire West
Hot, dry weather continued over the fire Thursday, but favorable winds allowed tactical firing operations to occur on the west and north parts of the fire. On the west side, firing operations were successful between Game Lake Peak and Saddle Mountain, tying the fire line in with areas burned by the Chetco Bar and Collier Butte Fires and removing fuel from the path of the advancing fire. 

Evacuation Information: Firing operations are not expected to change the evacuation level for Agness. The evacuation level in the Agness Zone is 2 - Be Set.

Location: 9 miles northwest of Selma
Ignition date: July 15, 2018
Cause: Lightning
Acres burned: 117,458 acres
Personnel: 1,126
Containment: 51%
More information:

Watson Creek Fire - Lake County
Fire crews continue to mop up and perform suppression repair along the fire boundary and within the interior. The Level 1 (Be Ready) evacuation status for Lakeview Estates was lifted yesterday. Road and area closures remain in effect through September 17.

Location: 
6 miles west of Paisley
Ignition Date: August 15, 2018
Cause: 
Under investigation
Acres burned: 
58,900 acres
Personnel: 
209
Containment: 
95%
More information: 

Miles and Columbus fires 
(formerly the South Umpqua Complex/Sugar Pine Fires; also includes Snow Shoe and Round Top)
As expected, the Miles and Columbus fires have merged. They remain within control lines.

Suppression repair continues on the southern fire perimeter, with mop-up and patrol continuing on the northern, western and eastern ends. Firefighters are monitoring for spot fires.

Location: Approximately 7 miles northeast of Trail
Ignition date: July 15, 2018
Cause: Lightning
Acres burned: Combined total of 53,166 acres
Personnel: 271
Containment: 65%
More information:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5966/

Taylor Creek and Klondike East
No additional fire growth is expected on the Taylor Creek or the East Zone of the Klondike Fire as there are well tested fire lines or recent burn scars surrounding the perimeter. Residents of the Illinois River Valley may see small smoke columns rising from the fire area depending on the weather, but they will be unburned islands torching out within the containment lines. This will be the final report unless significant activity occurs.
Location: 10 miles west of Grants Pass
Ignition date: July 15, 2018
Cause: Lightning
Acres burned: 52,839 acres
Personnel: 79
Containment: 95%
More information:

Tuesday, September 4, 2018

ODF Fire Update for September 4, 2018

Douglas Forest Protection Association catches several small fires along Interstate 5 over Labor Day weekend
Firefighters were challenged by six fires near the Curtin area along I-5 in check over the weekend.
Officials from DFPA believe about 97 acres burned in what is being referred to as the I-5 MP 163 Fires, which started Friday evening. The blazes were caused by a vehicle malfunction in the area, specifically a failed catalytic converter.
As of Monday morning, the fire had been 100% dozer-trailed and was 45% mopped up.
Ongoing fires

Watson Creek Fire - Lake County
This fire is being managed by Northwest Incident Management Team 6 (Incident Commander Shawn Sheldon).

Personnel and equipment numbers will continue to decrease as the incident management team aims to keep appropriate resources on the incident for the work that remains.
Containment has increased to 95% over the past few days as crews have continued full suppression, mop-up, patrol and repair activities. 

Location: 6 miles west of Paisley
Ignition Date: August 15, 2018
Cause: Under investigation
Acres burned: 58,761 acres
Personnel: 280
Containment: 95%
More information: 

Terwilliger Fire - Willamette National Forest
The fire is being managed by the Northern Rockies Team 4 (Incident Commander Rick Connell). 

Firing operations were successful yesterday in the northwest and southwest perimeters. Structural assessments continued along the Highway 126 corridor and Kings Road. Air operations added a 7th helicopter to provide support. However, smoke delayed air operations yesterday until mid-afternoon and may do so again today.
Location: 5 miles southeast of Blue River
Cause: Under investigation
Acres burned: 9,158
Personnel: 720
Containment: 29%
More information:
Klondike Fire West
The areas with the most fire growth occurred at the confluence of the east and west forks of Indigo Creek, along Silver Creek, and to the southwest into the Chetco Bar Fire burn area. Some growth occurred on the east perimeter. Reduced visibility due to smoke prevented air tanker flights, so helicopter water and gel drops were used exclusively. Crews continued fuel reduction operations on contingency lines and worked on structure protection in and around Agness.

Conditions favorable for high fire activity will persist on Tuesday. Firefighters will continue reducing fuel availability, treating the contingency line on the ridge on the west side of Horse Sign Creek, and treating the ridge west of Fish Hook Creek.

Evacuation Information: The evacuation level in the Agness Zone is 2 - Be Set.

Community meeting: Wednesday, Sept. 5, 5 p.m., Agness Community Library

Location: 9 miles northwest of Selma
Ignition date: July 15, 2018
Cause: Lightning
Acres burned: 112,307 acres
Personnel: 1,226
Containment: 42%
More information:

Miles and Columbus fires 
(formerly the South Umpqua Complex/Sugar Pine Fires; also includes Snow Shoe and Round Top)
These fires are being managed by the Nevada Type 3 Incident Management Team (Incident Commander Brock Uhlig).

Suppression repair continues on the southern fire perimeter, with mop-up and patrol continuing on the northern, western and eastern ends. Fires are remaining within containment lines as the Miles and Columbus fires grow together.

Location: Approximately 7 miles northeast of Trail
Ignition date: July 15, 2018
Cause: Lightning
Acres burned: Combined total of 52,841 acres
Personnel: 268
Containment: 62%
More information:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5966/

Taylor Creek and Klondike East
A Type 3 Incident Management Team led by Derrick Davenport assumed management of this fire at 8 a.m. today. The new Incident Command Post will be at the U.S. Forest Service's Wild Rivers Ranger Station in Cave Junction.

Location: 10 miles west of Grants Pass
Ignition date: July 15, 2018
Cause: Lightning
Acres burned: 52,839 acres
Personnel: 115
Containment: 95%
More information:

Hugo Road Fire declared conflagration as two residences destroyed, but containment grows

A fire reported Sunday evening north of Grants Pass grew to nearly 200 acres and destroyed two residences as firefighters faced numerous challenges, including live power lines and even a cougar sighting.

This fire is on private land near the community of Hugo, west of Interstate 5 near exit 66. As of Tuesday morning, a 200-plus firefighter force lined the entirety of the fire, boosting containment to 30 percent. Regular updates are being posted to swofire.com. 

Two residences, 13 outbuildings, two recreational vehicles and 11 vehicles were destroyed. Three additional residences were damaged. About 265 structures remained threatened and 663 people have been evacuated.

ODF's Southwest Oregon District is engaged in the fire along with the Oregon State Fire Marshal, Rural Metro Fire, the Grants Pass Department of Public Safety, Josephine County Emergency Management, Josephine County Sheriff's Office and the American Red Cross.

While gusty winds are still causing minor flare-ups throughout the fire's footprint, crews have made enough progress that OSFM teams are heading home today. However, both local structure and wildland crews will remain present to continue mop-up over the coming days.

The cause of the fire is under investigation.

Monday, September 3, 2018

A photo of the Hugo Road Fire burning near Hugo (about 10 miles north northwest of Grants Pass, OR). More information on this fire at the ODF Southwest Oregon District Wildfire Blog at  http://www.swofire.com/.

Friday, August 31, 2018

ODF Daily Fire Update, August 31, 2018


New fires reported on ODF-protected lands

There were no new fires 10 acres or larger reported on ODF-protected lands over the past 24 hours.

Ongoing fires

Ramsey Canyon Fire - Jackson County
As of 7:00 a.m. Friday, ODF Incident Management Team 2 (Incident Commander Link Smith) has handed the Ramsey Canyon Fire back to the ODF Southwest Oregon District.

Crews will continue mop up efforts into the holiday weekend, with a focus on the north perimeter. With 95 percent containment, equipment and personnel are being significantly scaled back.

Over the next few days, firefighters on the ground will be conducting fire suppression repair throughout the entire fire’s footprint. Crews are also searching for and extinguishing hot spots along the fire’s perimeter in order to continue securing control lines.

Unless the situation changes, this will be the final update on the Ramsey Canyon Fire.

 
Location: 12 miles north of Eagle Point
Ignition Date: August 22, 2018
Cause: Under investigation
Acres burned: 1,971 acres
Personnel: 132
Containment: 95%
For more information: Contact the ODF office in Medford at 541-664-3328.

Watson Creek Fire - Lake County

This fire is being managed by Northwest Incident Management Team 6 (Incident Commander Shawn Sheldon).

Crews continue with mop-up, monitoring, and patrol.

Location: 6 miles west of Paisley
Ignition Date: August 15, 2018
Cause: Under investigation
Acres burned: 58,092 acres
Personnel: 666
Containment: 80%
More information: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6153/

Terwilliger Fire - Willamette National Forest
The fire is being managed by the Northern Rockies Team 4 (Incident Commander Rick Connell).

There will be a Community Meeting about the Terwilliger Fire on Saturday September 1, 2018, beginning at 7:00 pm. It will be in the old gym at McKenzie High School, 51187 Blue River Drive, Finn Rock.

Yesterday, fire behavior was low due to moisture and increased cloud cover, allowing significant progress by fire fighters. On the southern perimeter of the fire, it continued to grow and progress up the Hardy Creek area in very rough terrain. The eastern front of the fire exhibited low intensity burning, and fire area north did not exhibit much growth. Personnel in that area continued to solidify a control line along the road to begin burn-out operations for securing the line.
 
Fire behavior is expected to be more active than yesterday as cloud cover departs, and there are lower humidity and warmer temperatures. Fuels remain very dry, continuing to contribute to high fire danger. Crews will work to strengthen existing control lines established along nearby roadways with support from additional aerial resources. The line constructed along the northern perimeter will be a major focus area to secure in the coming days, as conditions allow. The southern perimeter continues to be engaged when rough terrain allows. Contingency lines continue to be identified and prepared as fire behavior changes.

Location: 5 miles southeast of Blue River
Cause: Under investigation
Acres burned: 7,845
Personnel: 604
Containment: 26%
More information: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6160/

Miles and Columbus fires 
(formerly the South Umpqua Complex/Sugar Pine Fires; also includes Snow Shoe and Round Top)
These fires are being managed by the Nevada Type 3 Incident Management Team (Incident Commander Brock Uhlig).

Ongoing mop-up and suppression work continues, along with hazard tree removal.

Location: Approximately 7 miles northeast of Trail
Ignition date: July 15, 2018
Cause: Lightning
Acres burned: Combined total of 49,966 acres; Miles Fire: 35,770 acres; Columbus Fire: 10,226 acres
Personnel: Approximately 274
Containment: Miles Fire: 53% contained; Columbus Fire: 54% contained
More information: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5966/

Taylor Creek and Klondike East

The Taylor Creek Fire and the Klondike Fire East Zone are being managed by the Northwest Incident Management Team 12 (Incident Commander Craig Glazier).

Fire personnel continued their repair work with the emphasis moving to the south end of the fires. Logging equipment handled trees cut during suppression operations and moved them to a landing site. A large culvert is to be installed to facilitate water movement. Completion of this operation will require a compactor to firmly tamp the soil into place.

A marine layer will bring cloudy conditions accompanied by light drizzle to the western end of the fires on Friday morning. Any moisture will be too light to have significant impact on fire behavior. Conditions are forecasted to become sunny on Friday afternoon with temperatures slightly above normal. Winds will be swinging from west to north to northeast as the day progresses.

Location: 10 miles west of Grants Pass
Ignition date: July 15, 2018
Cause: Lightning
Acres burned: 52,839 acres
Personnel: 115
Containment: 95%
More information: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6058/ 
 
Klondike Fire West
The Klondike Fire West is now being managed by the Southern Area Red Team (Incident Commander Mike Dueitt).

The overall strategic objective on the fire is unchanged. A full suppression strategy is being used to minimize the total number of acres burned on all lands, while maintaining safety first.

The Klondike West Fire exhibited minimal activity and very little spread during the last 24 hours.

Firefighters strengthened existing fire-lines and completed preparations for a planned firing of portions of the Wild Horse Road fire-line south of the community of Agness. The objective is to produce a blackened buffer 1,000 feet from the primary fire-line. Marine-influenced humidity Thursday prevented firefighters from initiating this firing operation, but the team will continue to evaluate opportunities for this action. Firefighters will continue to strengthen existing control lines and to explore opportunities for constructing direct control adjacent to the fire along the northeast edge of the fire.
 
Evacuation Information: The evacuation level in the Agness Zone is 2 - Be Set.

Location: 9 miles northwest of Selma
Ignition date: July 15, 2018
Cause: Lightning
Acres burned: 102,168 acres
Personnel: 1,254
Containment: 40%
More information:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5998/ 

 

Comments and questions

The purpose of this blog is to provide breaking news about wildfire activity on the forestlands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. We invite you to post questions or comments about current wildfires. Please keep your posts civil and free of profanity.

Current wildfire info

National weather forecasters predictions that Oregon would see above average temperatures and below average rainfall in the summer of 2018 proved true. Almost all of Oregon was abnormally dry this summer, with a majority of the state in moderate to severe drought. Many areas posted record high temperatures or record strings of hot days. These conditions set the stage for potentially large, fast-moving wildfires.


What we do

Protection jurisdiction
The Oregon Dept. of Forestry protects 16 million acres of private and public forestlands from wildfire. This includes all private forestlands in Oregon as well as state and local government-owned forests, along with 2.8 million acres of federal Bureau of Land Management lands in the western part of the state. In total there are about 30.4 million acres of forest in Oregon.

Fire suppression policy
The department fights fire aggressively, seeking to put out most fires at 10 acres or smaller. This approach minimizes damage to the timber resource and fish and wildlife habitat, and protects lives and property. It also saves money. While suppressing large fires can cost millions of dollars, economic and environmental damage from wildfires can be many times greater.

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About Me

My photo
Oregon Dept. of Forestry's public information officers in Salem, Ore., maintain this blog. During the wildfire season, we spend much of our time reporting on fires and firefighting to news media and the public.